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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 136 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 58 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
James Buchanan, Buchanan's administration on the eve of the rebellion 5 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 4 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Doc or search for Doc in all documents.

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Doc. 11.-rebel Privateers. Letter of New-York Merchants. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C.: sir: The continued depredations of the rebel cruisers on the mercantile marine of the country have not only destroyed a large amount of the active capital of the merchants, but seriously threaten the very existence of that valuable part of our commerce. Apart from the loss of so much individual wealth and the destruction of so valuable a source of material power and enterprise, it is humiliating to our pride as citizens of the first naval power on the earth that a couple of indifferently equipped rebel cruisers should for so long a period threaten our commerce with annihilation. It is a painful source of mortification to every American, at home and abroad, that the great highways of our commerce have hitherto been left so unprotected by the almost total absence of national armed vessels as to induce rebel insolence to attack our flag almost at the entr
Doc. 12.-General Halleck's report of operations in 1863. Headquarters of the army, Washington, D. C., November 15, 1863. Sir: In compliance with your orders, I submit the following summary of military operations since my last annual report: Department of West-Virginia and army of the Potomac. When General Burnside relieved General McClellan from his command on the seventh of November of last year, the army of the Potomac was on the south side of the Potomac, under instructions to pursue Lee by a flank march on the interior line to Richmond, hugging closely to the Blue Ridge, so as to observe its passes and to give battle to the enemy whenever an opportunity occurred. On reaching Warrenton, however, General Burnside proposed to give up this pursuit of Lee's army toward Richmond, and to move down the north side of the Rappahannock to Falmouth, and establish a new base of supplies at Acquia Creek or Belle Plain. This proposed change of base was not approved by me, an
Doc. 13.-fight at Campbell's Station, Tenn. Knoxville, Tenn., November 7, 1863. The first engagement of any consequence between our forces and those of Longstreet, in the retreat to Knoxville, took place yesterday, at Campbell's Station — a little collection of houses on the Kingston road, where it forms a junction with the road to Loudon. During the night of Sunday, the rebels made three different charges on our position at Lenoir, with the intention of capturing the batteries on the right of our position; but every onset was met and repulsed. In the morning, our troops again took up the march in retreat, and the rebels pushed our rear-guard with so much energy that we were compelled to burn a train of wagons, to obtain the mules to aid in getting away the artillery. Its destruction was necessary, as otherwise we would have been compelled to abandon it to the enemy. One piece of artillery, which had become mired and could not be hauled out by the horses, fell into t
Doc. 14.-battles at Chattanooga, Tenn. Despatches to the war Department: from General Grant. [received 6.40 P. M., Nov. 23, 1863.] Chattanooga, Tenn., 3 P. M., Nov. 23, 1863. Major-General H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief: General Thomas's troops attacked the enemy's left at two P. M. to-day, carried first line of rifle-pits, running over the knoll one thousand two hundred yards in front of Wood's Fort and low ridge to the right of it, taking about two hundred prisoners, besides killed and wounded; our loss small. The troops moved under fire with all the precision of veterans on parade. Thomas's troops will intrench themselves, and hold their position until daylight, when Sherman will join the attack from the mouth of the Chickamauga, and a decisive battle will be fought. U. S. Grant, Major-General. From General Thomas. [received in cipher, 8.45 A. M., Nov. 25.] Chattanooga, Tenn., Nov. 24, 1863--12 M. Major-General Halleck, General-in-Chief: Yesterday, at
Doc. 15.-movements on the Rapidan. New-York Tribune account. headquarters Third division, Sixth corps, army of the Potomac, December 12, 1863. at half-past 6, on the morning of November twenty-sixth, (Thanksgiving,) the Second corps, Major-General G. K. Warren, left its camp on Mountain Run and marched to Germania Ford, with a battery of four four and a half-inch guns and one battery of six twenty-pounder Parrott guns from the reserve artillery, with three hundred cavalry, under the command of Captain Schwartz, of the Fourth New-York cavalry, and a pontoon train, under the command of Captain Mendell of the Engineers corps. The head of this column reached the steep embankments at Germania Ford, at half-past 8 A. M. Here a thick growth of almost impenetrable woods was met, and considerable time was occupied in felling trees, cutting out roads, and placing the artillery in position. All this was done with the greatest rapidity, and in the face of the enemy's pickets on th
Doc. 16.-General Magruder's address. headquarters District of Texas, New-Mexico, and Arizona, Houston, Nov. 27, 1863. To the planters of the coast counties: The Commanding General announces to the citizens of Texas, that a formidable invasion is attempted by the coast. Early in the month, General Banks took possession of the Lower Rio Grande, and on the eighteenth a force occupied Aransas and Corpus Christi Passes, capturing the small garrison there stationed. Despatches to the twenty-third, from Colonel Bradfute, commanding at Saluria, have been received, stating that a large force, supported by numerous ships, was advancing on that place, which, by this time, may have fallen. It becomes the grave duty of the Commanding General to state to the inhabitants of the counties contiguous to the coast what their duty to the country, as well as their own interest, demands at this crisis. The utter disregard of all social rights, as well as the distinct proclamation of Presiden
Doc. 17.-reduction of Fort Esperanza, Tex. Report of Major-General Washburn. headquarters, pass Cavallo expedition, Fort Esperanza, Texas, December 4, 1863. Major G. Norman Leiber Assistant Adjutant-General: Major: I herewith inclose reports of Brigadier-General T. E. G. Ransom, commanding brigade Second division, and Colonel H. D. Washburn, commanding First brigade First division Thirteenth army corps, detailing the action of their respective brigades in the reduction of this Fort. I refer to these reports, as containing most of the details pertaining to the expedition, and for the names of such persons as deserve specially to be honorably mentioned. On the twenty-first ultimo, I arrived at Aransas Pass with the Thirty-third Illinois, and part of the Eighteenth Indiana, on board steamer Clinton. On the twenty-second ultimo, I received the order of Major-General Banks to take command of an expedition up the coast, for the purpose of capturing this fort. On the same
Doc. 18.-the capture of Lookout Mountain. General Geary's congratulatory order. headquarters Second division, Twelfth army corps, Wauhatchie, Tenn., Dec. 3, 1838. General orders, No. 79. A most important era in the present contest for national existence has just been passed; battles, culminating in grandest success, fought and won, and the part taken by the troops of this division in the engagements by which it has been marked, having reflected so much honor upon themselves as individuals, and upon the command to which they are attached, the General commanding cannot refrain from alluding to these services in terms which shall convey, in some measure, his warm appreciation of their valor, their patriotism, and their noble endurance of severe hardships, while engaged in the arduous campaign. With heartfelt pride he reverts to their prowess in the assaults which made them the heroes of Lookout Mountain on the twenty-fourth ult., and to their gallant conduct upon Miss
Doc. 19.-the siege of Knoxville, Tenn. Knoxville, Monday, Nov. 16. The excitement consequent on the desperate dash of Forrest and Wheeler's cavalry upon General Sanders, on Saturday, and their approach to within two miles of Knoxville, together with the news of Longstreet's advance upon Burnside below, has somewhat subsided. The panic last night among the citizens can only be compared to the celebrated siege of Cincinnati, and, in fact, the gathering of Major McDowell's corps of paymasters, the hurried packing of ambulances and wagons, and preparations for burning a few maiden millions of greenbacks, and the presence of the doughty Major, were all somewhat suggestive of that eventful period in the history of your usually bustling, business city, when some two or three thousand ragged rebels frightened the entire commonwealth of Ohio nearly out of all propriety. The comparison, however, ceases with the suggestion, since our fears were not altogether groundless. With the
Doc. 20.-Government of the contrabands. General Butler's order. headquarters Eighteenth army corps, Department of Virginia and North-Carolina, Fort Monroe, Va., December 5, 1863. General orders, No. 46. the recruitment of colored troops has become the settled purpose of the Government. It is therefore the duty of every officer and soldier to aid in carrying out that purpose, by every proper means, irrespective of personal predilection. To do this effectually, the former condition of the blacks, their change of relation, the new rights acquired by them, the new obligations imposed upon them, the duty of the Government to them, the great stake they have in the war, and the claims their ignorance, and the helplessness of their women and children, make upon each of us who hold a higher grade in social and political life, must all be carefully considered. It will also be taken into account that the colored soldiers have none of the machinery of State aid, for the supp
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