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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 54 2 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 53 3 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 50 6 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 46 8 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 39 7 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 33 5 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 32 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 30 2 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 27 1 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 27 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government. You can also browse the collection for Montgomery (Alabama, United States) or search for Montgomery (Alabama, United States) in all documents.

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Chapter 6: Removal of the seat of Government to Richmond message to Congress at Richmond Confederate forces in Virginia forces of the enemy letter to General Johnston combat at Bethel Church affair at Romney movements of McDowell battle of Manassas. The provisional Congress, in session at Montgomery, Alabama, on May 21, 1861, resolved that this Congress will adjourn on Tuesday next, to meet again on the 20th day of July at Richmond, Virginia. The resolution further authorized the President to have the several executive departments, with their archives, removed at such intermediate time as he might determine, and added a proviso that, if any public emergency should render it impolitic to meet in Richmond, he should call the Congress together at some other place to be selected by him. The hostile demonstrations of the United States government against Virginia caused the President, at an early day after the adjournment of Congress, to proceed to Richmond and
r, Missouri, without arms or other military preparation, took up the gauntlet thrown at her feet, and dared to make war in defense of the laws and liberties of her people. My motive for promptly removing the seat of government, after authority was given by the provisional Congress, has been heretofore stated, but proximity to the main army of the enemy, and the flanking attacks by which the new capital was threatened, did not diminish the anxiety, which had been felt before removal from Montgomery, in regard to affairs in Missouri, the far west of the Confederacy. The state, which forty years before had been admitted to the Union, against sectional resistance to the right guaranteed by the Constitution, and specifically denominated in the treaty for the acquisition of Louisiana, now, because her governor refused to furnish troops for the unconstitutional purpose of coercing states, became the subject of special hostility and the object of extraordinary efforts for her subjugation
uth and west, and turned out a good deal of field artillery complete. The government powder mills were entirely successful. The arsenal and workshops at Charleston were enlarged, steam introduced, and good work done in various departments. The arsenal at Mount Vernon, Alabama, was moved to Selma, in that state, where it grew into a large and well-ordered establishment of the first class. Mount Vernon arsenal was dismantled, and served to furnish lumber and timber for use elsewhere. At Montgomery, shops were kept up for the repair of small arms and the manufacture of articles of leather. There were many other small establishments and depots. The chief armories were at Richmond and at Fayetteville, North Carolina. The former turned out about fifteen hundred stands per month, and the latter only four hundred per month, for want of operatives. To meet the want of cavalry arms, a contract was made for the construction in Richmond of a factory for Sharp's carbines; this being buil
ll matters between the States forming it, and their other late confederates of the United States, in relation to the public property and public debt at the time of their withdrawal from them; these States hereby declaring it to be their wish and earnest desire to adjust everything pertaining to the common property, common liability, and common obligations of that Union upon the principles of right, justice, equity, and good faith. 3. Until otherwise provided by the Congress, the city of Montgomery, in the State of Alabama, shall be the seat of government. 4. The members of the Congress and all executive and judicial officers of the Confederacy shall be bound by oath or affirmation to support this Constitution; but no religious test shall be required as a qualification to any office or public trust under this Confederacy. Constitution of the United States of America. This is an exact copy of the original in punctuation, spelling, capitals, etc. Constitution of the Confederat
n the Constitution or laws of any State to the contrary notwithstanding. 2. The Government hereby instituted shall take immediate steps for the settlement of all matters between the States forming it, and their other late confederates of the United States, in relation to the public property and public debt at the time of their withdrawal from them; these States hereby declaring it to be their wish and earnest desire to adjust everything pertaining to the common property, common liability, and common obligations of that Union upon the principles of right, justice, equity, and good faith. 3. Until otherwise provided by the Congress, the city of Montgomery, in the State of Alabama, shall be the seat of government. 4. The members of the Congress and all executive and judicial officers of the Confederacy shall be bound by oath or affirmation to support this Constitution; but no religious test shall be required as a qualification to any office or public trust under this Confederacy.
. Remarks in Senate showing position in Dec. 1860, 53-58. Member of Powell committee, 58-59. Adherence to state rights, 141. Davis Refutation of statements of Count of Paris, 173. Position in Jan., 1861, 176-78. Letter of Clav refuting misstatements, 177-78. Conferences with Buchanan, 183-84. Remarks on resigning from Senate, 189-192. Departure from Washington, 193. Appointment to command of army of Mis-sissippi, 195. Election to presidency of Confederacy, 197. Journey to Montgomery, 198. Inauguration, 198-203; extracts from inaugural address, 200-03. Extracts from letters concerning election to presidency, 203-06. Formation of cabinet, 207-09. No part in framing Confederate Consti-tution, 227. Letter to President of U. S., 228. Communication regarding Fort Sumter, 232. Extracts from message to Confederate Congress concerning Washington Commission, 239-41. Aid to Virginia from Confederacy, 260. Letter of instructions to Capt. Semmes, 270-71. Congress called,
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