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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

Found 25 total hits in 17 results.

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Child, Lydia Maria 1802-1880 Author; born in Medford, Mass., Feb. 11, 1802; educated in the common schools; began her literary career in 1819; and was noted as a supporter of the abolition movement. In 1859 she sent a letter of sympathy to John Brown, who was then imprisoned at Harper's Ferry, offering to become his nurse. This offer he declined, but requested her to aid his family, which she did. Governor Wise, of Virginia, politely rebuked her in a letter, and another epistle from Senator Mason's wife threatened her with eternal punishment. These letters with her replies were subsequently published and reached a circulation of 300,000. In 1840-43 she was editor of the National Anti-slavery standard. Her publications include The rebels; The first settlers of New England; Freedman's book; Appeal for that class of Americans called Africans; Miria, a romance of the republic, etc. She died in Wayland, Mass., Oct. 20, 1880.
Child, Lydia Maria 1802-1880 Author; born in Medford, Mass., Feb. 11, 1802; educated in the common schools; began her literary career in 1819; and was noted as a supporter of the abolition movement. In 1859 she sent a letter of sympathy to John Brown, who was then imprisoned at Harper's Ferry, offering to become his nurse. This offer he declined, but requested her to aid his family, which she did. Governor Wise, of Virginia, politely rebuked her in a letter, and another epistle from Senator Mason's wife threatened her with eternal punishment. These letters with her replies were subsequently published and reached a circulation of 300,000. In 1840-43 she was editor of the National Anti-slavery standard. Her publications include The rebels; The first settlers of New England; Freedman's book; Appeal for that class of Americans called Africans; Miria, a romance of the republic, etc. She died in Wayland, Mass., Oct. 20, 1880.
Child, Lydia Maria 1802-1880 Author; born in Medford, Mass., Feb. 11, 1802; educated in the common schools; began her literary career in 1819; and was noted as a supporter of the abolition movement. In 1859 she sent a letter of sympathy to John Brown, who was then imprisoned at Harper's Ferry, offering to become his nurse. This offer he declined, but requested her to aid his family, which she did. Governor Wise, of Virginia, politely rebuked her in a letter, and another epistle from Senator Mason's wife threatened her with eternal punishment. These letters with her replies were subsequently published and reached a circulation of 300,000. In 1840-43 she was editor of the National Anti-slavery standard. Her publications include The rebels; The first settlers of New England; Freedman's book; Appeal for that class of Americans called Africans; Miria, a romance of the republic, etc. She died in Wayland, Mass., Oct. 20, 1880.
October 20th, 1880 AD (search for this): entry child-lydia-maria
Child, Lydia Maria 1802-1880 Author; born in Medford, Mass., Feb. 11, 1802; educated in the common schools; began her literary career in 1819; and was noted as a supporter of the abolition movement. In 1859 she sent a letter of sympathy to John Brown, who was then imprisoned at Harper's Ferry, offering to become his nurse. This offer he declined, but requested her to aid his family, which she did. Governor Wise, of Virginia, politely rebuked her in a letter, and another epistle from Senator Mason's wife threatened her with eternal punishment. These letters with her replies were subsequently published and reached a circulation of 300,000. In 1840-43 she was editor of the National Anti-slavery standard. Her publications include The rebels; The first settlers of New England; Freedman's book; Appeal for that class of Americans called Africans; Miria, a romance of the republic, etc. She died in Wayland, Mass., Oct. 20, 1880.
Child, Lydia Maria 1802-1880 Author; born in Medford, Mass., Feb. 11, 1802; educated in the common schools; began her literary career in 1819; and was noted as a supporter of the abolition movement. In 1859 she sent a letter of sympathy to John Brown, who was then imprisoned at Harper's Ferry, offering to become his nurse. This offer he declined, but requested her to aid his family, which she did. Governor Wise, of Virginia, politely rebuked her in a letter, and another epistle from Senator Mason's wife threatened her with eternal punishment. These letters with her replies were subsequently published and reached a circulation of 300,000. In 1840-43 she was editor of the National Anti-slavery standard. Her publications include The rebels; The first settlers of New England; Freedman's book; Appeal for that class of Americans called Africans; Miria, a romance of the republic, etc. She died in Wayland, Mass., Oct. 20, 1880.
Child, Lydia Maria 1802-1880 Author; born in Medford, Mass., Feb. 11, 1802; educated in the common schools; began her literary career in 1819; and was noted as a supporter of the abolition movement. In 1859 she sent a letter of sympathy to John Brown, who was then imprisoned at Harper's Ferry, offering to become his nurse. This offer he declined, but requested her to aid his family, which she did. Governor Wise, of Virginia, politely rebuked her in a letter, and another epistle from Senator Mason's wife threatened her with eternal punishment. These letters with her replies were subsequently published and reached a circulation of 300,000. In 1840-43 she was editor of the National Anti-slavery standard. Her publications include The rebels; The first settlers of New England; Freedman's book; Appeal for that class of Americans called Africans; Miria, a romance of the republic, etc. She died in Wayland, Mass., Oct. 20, 1880.
Child, Lydia Maria 1802-1880 Author; born in Medford, Mass., Feb. 11, 1802; educated in the common schools; began her literary career in 1819; and was noted as a supporter of the abolition movement. In 1859 she sent a letter of sympathy to John Brown, who was then imprisoned at Harper's Ferry, offering to become his nurse. This offer he declined, but requested her to aid his family, which she did. Governor Wise, of Virginia, politely rebuked her in a letter, and another epistle from Senator Mason's wife threatened her with eternal punishment. These letters with her replies were subsequently published and reached a circulation of 300,000. In 1840-43 she was editor of the National Anti-slavery standard. Her publications include The rebels; The first settlers of New England; Freedman's book; Appeal for that class of Americans called Africans; Miria, a romance of the republic, etc. She died in Wayland, Mass., Oct. 20, 1880.
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