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John F. Hume, The abolitionists together with personal memories of the struggle for human rights 38 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 34 2 Browse Search
John Jay Chapman, William Lloyd Garrison 30 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 30 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 28 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 24 2 Browse Search
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley 22 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 20 2 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4 20 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 20 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for John Quincy Adams or search for John Quincy Adams in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 18: the irrepressible Conflict.—1858. (search)
States of this Union Lib. 28.98. —was clearly at odds with the Constitutional injunction Art. 4,??? 2,??? 3. shall be delivered up. Nevertheless, the abolitionists could appeal on their own behalf to so high an authority Lib. 28.170. as John Quincy Adams. That statesman, objecting to the Constitution of Missouri (pending her admission to the Union) that it disfranchised all the people of color who were citizens of the free States, and was thus directly repugnant to the rights reserved to eCongress, by admitting Missouri with such an article, made a breach in the Federal Constitution that would warrant a still more revolutionary proceeding: Therefore, until that portion of the citizens of Massachusetts J. Quincy's Life of J. Q. Adams, p. 113; Lib. 28.170. whose rights were violated by the article in the Missouri Compromise, should be redintegrated in the full enjoyment and possession of those rights, no clause or article of the Constitution of the United States should, wit
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 20: Abraham Lincoln.—1860. (search)
the ordinance regarding the nature of the compact alleged to have been nullified by the North, let us take that of John Quincy Adams, from the familiar armory of the abolitionists: Yes! it cannot be denied—the slaveholding lords of the Addreion as it was. In this fatuous endeavor Massachusetts Republicans were destined to take part—among them the son of John Quincy Adams. In 1820 the father wrote in his Diary, 5.12. Diary: I have favored this Missouri Compromise, believing it which is to sever the ties of this Union, the same sword will cut asunder the bonds of slavery itself. Quincy's Life of Adams, p. 114; Lib. 28.170. Garrison's perception was identical with Adams's. He greeted his readers at the opening of the Adams's. He greeted his readers at the opening of the thirty-first Lib. 31:[2]. volume of the Liberator with these words, suggested by the political situation: All Union-saving efforts are simply idiotic. At last, the covenant with death is annulled, and the agreement with hell broken—at least by th<
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