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Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 30 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 26 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 24 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 24 4 Browse Search
Elias Nason, The Life and Times of Charles Sumner: His Boyhood, Education and Public Career. 24 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 22 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 20 0 Browse Search
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist 14 0 Browse Search
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown 14 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for Theodore Parker or search for Theodore Parker in all documents.

Your search returned 59 results in 16 document sections:

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 15: the Personal Liberty Law.—1855. (search)
assuming the historical-biographical part of the appointed exercises, no wonder that Mr. Garrison spoke with good cheer of the contrast between 1835 and 1855, and found all the signs of the times encouraging, though admitting Lib. 25.174. that more than a million slaves are to be delivered who were not in existence twenty years ago. We shall seek in vain in his speech any prescience or intimation of the impending Civil War. As little will it be found in those of Wendell Phillips and Theodore Parker. Henry C. Lib. 25.174, 175. Wright grazed it in these passages: Now, Mr. Chairman, the question we have to decide is, Lib. 25.175. What shall we do? Some of us, many of us, I believe, have put on the armor for death or victory; and now, what have we to do? We have got a terrible fact to deal with in this country, and we cannot stop to discuss the technical meaning of words, whether in the Bible or in the Constitution. We have to deal with a fact that manifests itself in the
, wrought the North to the pitch of resistance symbolized by the vote for Fremont. It carried the clergy off their feet, and opened their churches to meetings for the donation of Sharp's rifles for Kansas—Henry Ward Lib. 26.51. Beecher and Theodore Parker being conspicuous in the Lib. 26.51, 54. promotion of this object, and both incurring Mr. Garrison's friendly and discriminating censure. To the former, Lib. 26.34, 42, 54, 58. who had said, You might just as well read the Bible to Lib. ently come from Kansas itself (from John Brown, namely) with the aid of Gerrit Smith, who had got bravely back up the dam of non-resistance which he was once carried over. He was Ante, 2.317; Lib. 26.54. now even more prominent than Beecher and Parker in bestowing and soliciting arms for Kansas; and, from a Revolutionary standpoint, nothing could be better than his remarks, full of insight, at a Kansas convention in Buffalo, July 10, 1856: Most of you are relying largely on political act
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 17: the disunion Convention.—1857. (search)
evening will seem years away. To-morrow may make this evening only the sound of revelry by night before Waterloo. Theodore Parker, sending a letter in Lib. 27.5. lieu of a speech, was likewise in no festal mood. He found the Republican Party ine, have their bowels wonderfully moved all at once with sympathy for the suffering slave! Even our esteemed friend, Theodore Parker (who deals in no cant), says, in his letter, Lib. 27.14. that he cannot consent to cut himself off from the slave pon. I am the more reconciled to this because Phillips could not have gone to it, if it had been held this month. Theodore Parker, Phillips, Higginson, etc., will send letters to the meeting at Cleveland, expressive of their views on the Disunionrity of Mr. Garrison and his wife neither MSS. W. L. G., June 18, 20, Lib. 27.203; 28.3; Ms. Nov. 8, 1857, W. L. G. to T. Parker. began nor ended at home. Straitened themselves for means in this gloomy time, their active sympathy was extended to v
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 18: the irrepressible Conflict.—1858. (search)
ay, Sr. and Jr., by Francis Jackson, Wendell Phillips, Theodore Parker, and others. Both the Committee and the Legislature w At the New England Convention in Boston on May 26, Theodore Parker (equally with Mr. Higginson a Ibid., pp. 440, 447, 458-460, 463, 511, 512; Weiss's Life of Parker, 2.161. confidant of John Brown, and fresh from meeting him with his secret com seemed a proper theme for Mr. Garrison when occupying Theodore Parker's pulpit in Music Hall on May 30, 1858, as a substitute: Theodore Parker to W. L. Garrison. Boston, June 3, 1858. Ms. My dear Mr. Garrison: I owe you many thanks for also, with the hearty thanks of Yours faithfully, Theodore Parker. W. L. Garrison to Theodore Parker. 14 Dix PlaTheodore Parker. 14 Dix Place, June 3, 1858. Ms. My dear Mr. Parker: I am greatly obliged to you for your kind note—so characteristic of your catholMr. Parker: I am greatly obliged to you for your kind note—so characteristic of your catholic spirit in all matters pertaining to an honest and conscientious difference of opinion. Be assured, if I had supposed you
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 19: John Brown.—1859. (search)
gh he is a professing Infidel. He cannot stand Theodore Parker, even, Ms. Nov. 24, 1857, to R. D. Webb. adds on, I hear, in various quarters at the illness of Mr. Parker, as though it were a visitation of divine displeall among thieves? It was quickly decided that Mr. Parker must seek a warmer climate for the bare chance ofst Indies. Lib. 29.23. W. L. Garrison to Theodore Parker. Boston, January 15, 1859. Ms. As an act you, before you leave the city. Of that you and Mrs. Parker must be the judge. I shall try to look wholly will give me great pleasure to perform it. Theodore Parker to W. L. Garrison. Boston, January 31, 1859.eve me Affectionately and thankfully yours, Theodore Parker. All these losses to the working strength , 219)? one Sunday evening in January, 1857, in Theodore Parker's parlors. He saw in the famous Jan. 4, 11, 1ment against Garrison's citations from the New, and Parker from time to time injecting a bit of Lexington into
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 20: Abraham Lincoln.—1860. (search)
Lib. 30.186. needless to say, not called by Garrisonian abolitionists. Turned out of doors by the Mayor, it adjourned for the evening to the Belknap-Street (colored) Church, where the spirit of violence was still more rampant, at least at the close, when Mrs. Chapman was thought to have saved M. W. Chapman. Mr. Phillips's life by her companionship, and when he himself had to be escorted home by a body-guard. The orator's scarifying review of these proceedings, from Lib. 30.202, 203. Theodore Parker's pulpit, on Sunday, December 16,—his topic being Mobs and Education,—brought him a second (daylight) assault as he issued from the Music Hall, and made his return home a street fight. On the same day, in Brooklyn, Henry Ward Beecher had to be guarded by Lib. 30.203. police in Plymouth Church. In Philadelphia, George William Curtis, engaged to lecture on Honesty in a lyceum course, was suppressed by the joint apprehensions Lib. 30.209. of the Mayor and the owners of the hall. Fo
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