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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register. Search the whole document.

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Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
fidence find good success, I miss of my mark. Since then he hath sent to Mr. Prydden to come to them, being invited by some of the Brethren by private letters: I gave warning to Mr. Prydden to bethink himself what he did; and I know he is sensible and watchful. I profess, how it is possible to keep peace with a man so adventurous and so pertinacious, who will vent what he list and maintain what he vents, its beyond all the skill I have to conceive. Mr. Umphrey, I hear, invites him to Providence, and that coast is most meet for his opinion and practice. The Lord says he will teach the humble his way; but where are those men? The Lord make us such, that he may shew us such mercy. Totus tuus, T. Hooker. Nov. 2th. 1640. I writ another letter, because happily Haply. some of the brethren would be ready to desire the sight of what is writ; that you may shew; this you ∧ shew or conceal, as you see meet. Sunt mutua preces in perpetuum. All here salute you and yours.
price of a milch cow had kept from 25 to 30l, but fell at once this year to 5 or 6l. A farmer, who could spare but one cow in a year out of his stock, used to clothe his family with the price of it, at the expense of the new comers; when this failed they were put to difficulties. Although they judged they had 12,000 neat cattle, yet they had but about 3,000 sheep in the Colony. Hist. Mass., i. 93. Winthrop says, This year there came over great store of provisions, both out of England and Ireland, and but few passengers (and those brought very little money), which was occasioned by the store of money and quick markets which the merchants found here the two or three years before, so as now all our money was drained from us, and cattle and all commodities grew very cheap, which enforced us at the next General Court, in the eighth month, to make an order, that corn should pass in payments of new debts; Indian, at 4s. the bushel; rye, at 5s., and wheat, at 6s.; and that upon all execut
Watertown (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
y the Town, That the Townsmen should prosecute suit in law against such of the inhabitants of Watertowne as have trespassed in our Great Swamp. At this time Sparks Street and Vassal Lane formed part of the boundary line between Cambridge and Watertown; and the Great Swamp extended northerly from Vassal Lane on both sides of Menotomy River. It would seem that the Townsmen immediately commenced suit against one of the trespassers. In the Court Files of Middlesex County, 1649-50, is still preserved The Reply of Richard Jackson and Thomas Danforth, plaint., in the behalf of the town of Cambridge, against Samuel Thatcher, of Watertown, def., unto his several answers in the action of the cause for taking away wood out of their bounds. In answer to the allegation that the swamp was common property, it is declared that, The present inhabitants of Cambridge purchased the whole dimensions of the town (this legally settled their bounds by order of Court) of the Harford Company about fourt
Town Spring (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
Chapter 6: civil History. Contemplated removal to Weathersfield, Conn. Letter from Winthrop to Hooker. Letter from Hooker to Shepard. depreciation in the value of property. danger of general bankruptcy. reasons for removing. Sir Henry Vane. grant of Shawshine to Cambridge. removal of John Haynes. death of Roger Harlakenden. arrival of Herbert Pelham. Town Spring. Restrictions on the cutting of trees. Field-drivers, Commissioners to end small causes, Clerk of the Market, and Sealer of Leather, first elected. Calves impounded. eight-penny ordinary for Townsmen. penalty for absence from monthly meetings. prosecution for trespass in the great Swamp. fence-viewers first elected. Remission of tax on account of sickness. chimneys to be swept every month and ladders to be kept ready for reaching the roofs of houses. Orchard. Wharf. division of Shawshine lands. incorporation of Billerica Notwithstanding Mr. Shepard and his associates here found sufficient for
Middlesex County (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
h. Feb. 16, 1648-9. Voted, by the Town, That the Townsmen should prosecute suit in law against such of the inhabitants of Watertowne as have trespassed in our Great Swamp. At this time Sparks Street and Vassal Lane formed part of the boundary line between Cambridge and Watertown; and the Great Swamp extended northerly from Vassal Lane on both sides of Menotomy River. It would seem that the Townsmen immediately commenced suit against one of the trespassers. In the Court Files of Middlesex County, 1649-50, is still preserved The Reply of Richard Jackson and Thomas Danforth, plaint., in the behalf of the town of Cambridge, against Samuel Thatcher, of Watertown, def., unto his several answers in the action of the cause for taking away wood out of their bounds. In answer to the allegation that the swamp was common property, it is declared that, The present inhabitants of Cambridge purchased the whole dimensions of the town (this legally settled their bounds by order of Court) of t
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
the letter already quoted, to persuade Mr. Shepard and his congregation to remove. But why they should remove to Connecticut rather than to some other part of Massachusetts does not very plainly appear. There were large tracts of unappropriated lands here. There is no evidence that Mr. Shepard or his people had any jealousy, sucout one of the most violent conflicts of religious opinion ever known in this country, may have stimulated the subsequent desire to remove beyond the limits of Massachusetts. This seems to be indicated in the fifth Reason for removing, entered by Mr. Shepard on the fly-leaf of one of his manuscript books, This book contains The to come; at least, not such good room as now. And now you may best sell. 5. Because Mr. Vane will be upon our skirts. Mr. Vane was elected Governor of Massachusetts in 1636, and was an active associate of Mrs. Hutchinson in the Antinomian party. Chiefly, it would seem, on account of his religious opinions, he was supersed
John Cooper (search for this): chapter 8
. Nath. Sparhauke140 85. John Stedman300 86. Willm. Russell60 87. William Patten 90 88. Ben. Bower20 89. Tho. Briggam 180 90. John Russell80 91. Will. Bucke20 92. Richard Ecles70 93. Mrs. Sarah Simes50 94. Mr. Jacson400 95. Mr. Andrews150 96. Abra. Errington70 97. Widd: Cutter40 98. ffr. Moore, senr.50 99. Mr. Josseph Cooke300 100. Wm. Wilcocke90 101. Christopher Cane80 102. Rich. Dana20 103. Mr. Angier300 104. Vincet Druse15 105. Rogr. Bancroft100 106. John Cooper 140 107. Edw. Shepard80 108. Tho. Bridge50 109. Ranold Bush10 110. Tho. Prentise150 111. Math. Bridge 80 112. Golden Moore100 113. Robert Brodish30 Memo. There is these two persons overslipped, viz. 28. Richard Robbins80 91. Daniell Wines10 These two lots must come in their due order. The town do give to Gregory Stone, adjoining to his farm, one hundred acres.100 Although, by the generosity of the Church, all the inhabitants received allotments of the Shawshine lands
John Taylor (search for this): chapter 8
Lot.Acres. 1. Daniell Cheaver20 2. William Clemmance, senr.30 3. Daniell Kempster80 4. William Bull15 5. Roger Bucke10 6. Thomas ffox80 7. Humphery Bradshew15 8. Mr. Boman20 9. William Clemmance30 10. Richard Cutter80 11. Thomas Longhorne60 12. Daniell Blogget40 13. Robert Holmes150 14. Th. Hall20 15. Widow Banbricke40 16. John Jacson50 17. Wm. Homan50 18. Nath. Greene and Mother80 19. Richard ffrench20 20. John Watson80 21. Richard Woodes10 22. John Taylor60 23. Wid: Wilkerson60 24. Lieft. William ffrench150 25. Joseph Miller15 26. Jonath. Hide20 27. David ffiske60 28. Wid: Hancocke10 29. And. Stevenson60 30. Mr. Elijath Corlet100 31. David Stone50 32. Tho. Danforth220 Lot. Acres. 33. Rich. ffrances 60 34. John Parker 10 35. Jonath. Padlefoote 15 36. Edw. Hall 70 37. Ri. Oldam 60 38. Gilbert Cracbone 90 39. Robert Stedman 90 40. Tho. Swoetman 70 41. Wm. Bordman 60 42. John Betts 90 43. John Shepard
Edward Winship (search for this): chapter 8
one 90 39. Robert Stedman 90 40. Tho. Swoetman 70 41. Wm. Bordman 60 42. John Betts 90 43. John Shepard 60 44. Daniell Stone 50 45. John ffrenches children 30 46. John ffownell 100 47. Samll. Hides 80 48. Tho. Marret 200 49. Edw. Winship 200 50. Goodm. Hammond 15 51. Steven Day 50 52. John Gibson 80 53. Edw. Goffe 450 54. William Man 70 55. Ri. Jacson 200 56. Willm. Dixon 80 57. George Willowes 60 58. Tho. Chesholme 100 59. Mr. Edmund ffrost 200 60. John Halne entire body of itself,—the town consented to choose five persons a Committee to treat and conclude with them concerning their request therein; at which time there was chosen Mr. Henry Dunster, Elder Champney, John Bridge, Edward Goffe, and Edward Winship. The result appears in the Record of the General Court, under date of May 23, 1655:— In answer to the desire of our brethren and neighbors, the inhabitants of Shawshin, requesting immunities and freedom from all public rates and charges
Samuel Shepard (search for this): chapter 8
om Winthrop to Hooker. Letter from Hooker to Shepard. depreciation in the value of property. dancorporation of Billerica Notwithstanding Mr. Shepard and his associates here found sufficient fodest daughter had become the second wife of Mr. Shepard in 1637. How far Mr. Hooker may have been vice, even with urgency, his own letters to Mr. Shepard afford conclusive evidence. Very probably ater, Mr. Hooker wrote an earnest letter to Mr. Shepard, which was long preserved in the library ofe is not to the gentlemen in Cambridge with Mr. Shepard, but to certain others in England, for whom, as appears by another letter from Hooker to Shepard, without date: Touching your business at MataLord sent Mr. Roger Harlakenden and my brother Samuel Shepard to visit me after they had heard of outo me, etc. (Boston Ed., 1832, pp. 54, 55). Mr. Shepard was accompanied to New England by this mostt Cambridge, Feb. 14, 1640-1, as appears by Mr. Shepard's Diary, at which time the project passes o
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