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Browsing named entities in a specific section of John D. Billings, The history of the Tenth Massachusetts battery of light artillery in the war of the rebellion. Search the whole document.

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roops, like Barlow's gained a position far in advance of the one they started from, and close to the enemy. Hancock's corps, the only portion of the Yankee army that had come in contact with the Confederate works, had been hurled back in a storm of fire.—Third Year of the War. Edward A. Pollard. The story of the Second Corps is the story of the Sixth and Eighteenth that assaulted at the same time. They were repulsed most disastrously at every point. The following statement is made by Mr. Swinton on p. 487, Army of the Potomac, and has been adopted by many subsequent writers. Harper's Pictorial History of the Rebellion discredits it. Others have denied it. Some hours after the failure of the first assault, Gen. Meade sent instructions to each corps commander to renew the attack. . . . . . . But no man stirred, and the immobile lines pronounced a verdict, silent yet emphatic, against further slaughter. During the afternoon we fired only at long intervals, lying pretty low,
Samuel Paine (search for this): chapter 14
n his official report,] I commenced withdrawing my corps in obedience to instructions from the Major General commanding. My orders required me to mass near army headquarters, but were afterwards changed, and I was directed to make every effort to reach Cold Harbor as early as possible to reinforce Wright's (Sixth Corps) left. Every exertion was made; but the night was dark, the heat and dust oppressive, and the roads unknown. Still we should have reached Cold Harbor in good season; but Capt. Paine, topographical engineer, who had been ordered to report to me to guide my column, unfortunately took one of my divisions by a short cut where artillery could not follow, which threw my column into confusion. .... The head of my column reached Cold Harbor at 6.30 A. M., June 2d. but in such an exhausted condition that a little time was allowed the men to close up and to cook their rations. (The attack ordered for the morning was postponed until 5 P. M.) It may be desirable at this poi
E. M. Haynes (search for this): chapter 14
o: On the 11th the division moved to the left into some works vacated by the Second Corps, which were very high, and so close up to the enemy's lines that Yank and Johnny could easily converse with each other . . . . Behind these works were vast excavations covered with logs, in which officers burrowed. They served the double purpose of shelter from the shells of the Rebel mortar batteries, and protection from the burning heat of the sun. History of the Tenth Reg. Vermont Vol. Chaplain E. M. Haynes. We were left for the most part unmolested, and what firing we engaged in was directed at small working parties; or perhaps we took the part of our pickets, when the enemy pressed them too hotly, by sending a shell over among their zealous opponents, which always exerted a wonderfully quieting influence upon them. Once in a while also we would bestow our attention upon some battery that had the audacity to throw a shell or two into the Union lines. These things we did with impuni
ir officers were heard, then the well-known yell, and a rush for our line. Now came our turn, but we had not the advantage of strong earthworks. The men rose in their places, and poured in heavy volleys of musketry, and for a few moments there was a struggle as severe as in the morning, extending along the entire front of Hancock and Wright. It was soon over; some of the Confederates were captured, many lay killed or wounded, and the rest of the advance quickly retired to their defences. Banes: History of the Philadelphia Brigade. And again. June 3, 10:20 P. M. Despatch received from Army Headquarters, authorizing corps commanders to open all of their artillery at 12 or 1 o'clock to-night, in retaliation for the enemy's attack at 8 this P. M. The Diary of a Staff Officer, Second Corps. A third attempt to slumber is crowned with success, but we are astir at the first streaks of dawn on the morning of June 4th, and are ordered into the advanced position at our l
se to the enemy. Hancock's corps, the only portion of the Yankee army that had come in contact with the Confederate works, had been hurled back in a storm of fire.—Third Year of the War. Edward A. Pollard. The story of the Second Corps is the story of the Sixth and Eighteenth that assaulted at the same time. They were repulsed most disastrously at every point. The following statement is made by Mr. Swinton on p. 487, Army of the Potomac, and has been adopted by many subsequent writers. Harper's Pictorial History of the Rebellion discredits it. Others have denied it. Some hours after the failure of the first assault, Gen. Meade sent instructions to each corps commander to renew the attack. . . . . . . But no man stirred, and the immobile lines pronounced a verdict, silent yet emphatic, against further slaughter. During the afternoon we fired only at long intervals, lying pretty low, meanwhile, as a mark of respect to the enemy's sharpshooters. But now came a rumor that we
Lewis R. Allard (search for this): chapter 14
and talk freely with one another, and perhaps exchange papers or rations. But such truces were precarious, as the least thing—the accidental discharge of a musket, or the rumble of a wagon—would bring on the firing again. The loss of the Union army at Cold Harbor was 13,153 men; of the Rebels, not more than as many hundred. Morning reports. 1864 June 1. One horse died—exhaustion. June 2. One horse died—exhaustion. June 6. Corp. Geo. A. Smith returned from hospital and reported for duty. L. R. Allard, formerly dropped from the rolls, returned from. Camp Parole Md., and is again taken up on the books. June 7. One horse died—exhaustion. June 8. One horse died in train—exhaustion. Alvin Abbott previously dropped, returned. Corporal W. B. Lemmon returned. June 9. One horse died in train,—exhaustion. June 10. One horse died of exhaustion. June 11. Received from Capt. Cochrane 18 horses. Two horses died—glanders. June 12. Two horses died
John Gibbon (search for this): chapter 14
4.30 A. M., June 3d.—Hancock's Official Report. Just at dusk Gen. Gibbon rode up to Capt. Sleeper and delivered his orders in person. Ca of the Union Our Second position at Cold Harbor, 1896 line, with Gibbon on the right, Barlow on the left, and Birney in reserve. We were located in Gibbon's line. A few minutes after the time specified for the attack (4.30) a staff officer rode up from Gen. Gibbon and ordered ouGen. Gibbon and ordered our right piece to be fired as a signal gun. Then was there indeed a veritable tempest. At once it was responded to by the entire line, and bty yards from the enemy, where his troops soon covered themselves. Gibbon's men, too, under obstacles, advanced to the enemy's works, and a fss than an hour the Second Corps lost more than three thousand men. Gibbon's troops, like Barlow's gained a position far in advance of the oned Napoleons could better serve the country; but the Fates, i. e. Gen. Gibbon, ordered otherwise, and we had the rather grim satisfaction of k
W. Gordon McCabe (search for this): chapter 14
riginal position. Immediately the enemy drove it in, at the same time making an effort to carry the line of battle. They were promptly repulsed. An attack was then made on Hoke's line with a like result. The firing then ceased for the night. McCabe: Life and Campaigns of Gen. Robert E. Lee. Per contra. A little before dark it was evident from the commotion among the Confederates in front of the Philadelphia Brigade, and of the brigades on the right and left, that an assault was in pickets are very close to the enemy's . . . . . . . Major Wooten, 18th N. C. Infantry, met Col. Lyman and myself.—Diary of a Staff Officer. After some informalities in the asking had been adjusted, For interesting particulars on this point see McCabe's Life and Campaigns of Lee. the truce was granted the 7th, to last from 12 M. till 3 P. M. Then ensued a scene so anomalous in the prosecution of war! All the firing soon died away, the details went out from both sides to engage in the buria
W. H. D. Cochrane (search for this): chapter 14
and talk freely with one another, and perhaps exchange papers or rations. But such truces were precarious, as the least thing—the accidental discharge of a musket, or the rumble of a wagon—would bring on the firing again. The loss of the Union army at Cold Harbor was 13,153 men; of the Rebels, not more than as many hundred. Morning reports. 1864 June 1. One horse died—exhaustion. June 2. One horse died—exhaustion. June 6. Corp. Geo. A. Smith returned from hospital and reported for duty. L. R. Allard, formerly dropped from the rolls, returned from. Camp Parole Md., and is again taken up on the books. June 7. One horse died—exhaustion. June 8. One horse died in train—exhaustion. Alvin Abbott previously dropped, returned. Corporal W. B. Lemmon returned. June 9. One horse died in train,—exhaustion. June 10. One horse died of exhaustion. June 11. Received from Capt. Cochrane 18 horses. Two horses died—glanders. June 12. Two horses died
John Bradley (search for this): chapter 14
ry superadded. It was simply terrific. The fire of our Battery is directed upon some guns nearly opposite, of which we soon succeed in getting accurate range, and shell them most prodigally. But this is no one-sided game, for it or some other battery soon gets us in range, now throwing a shot into the bank of earth before us, and now exploding a shell at just the right distance to sweep the fragments across our guns. The Fourth Detachment piece is struck twice by them. Its No. 7 man, John Bradley, has a close call made for him by a shot which, just scaling the works, strikes the edge of the pit in which he crouches when not carrying ammunition, covers him with the loose earth, whirls his overcoat away, and sends his canteen flying into the ranks of a neighboring regiment. The following entry was made in his diary, at the close of this day, by a spare man in the Fourth Detachment: It seems to-day as though H-ll had broke loose. The fighting is harder than ever. Shot and shell
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