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Raccoon Ford (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
of the Fourth were killed. On the same day, Gen. W. H. F. Lee with his cavalry force and Johnston's North Carolina brigade commanded by Colonel Garrett of the Fifth regiment, opposed the crossing of Buford's cavalry division at Morton's and Raccoon fords. The brigades of Buford that had crossed over were driven back. The Fifth, Twenty-third and five companies of the Twelfth regiment, under Colonel Garrett, crossed at Raccoon ford, and the Twentieth and five companies of the Twelfth crossed Raccoon ford, and the Twentieth and five companies of the Twelfth crossed at Morton's ford, and followed the Federals to Stevensburg. These regiments succeeded in forcing the enemy to retire. The loss in the brigade was 4 killed and 38 wounded. At Brandy Station, General Gordon reports: Near Bradford's house I sent the First North Carolina cavalry to attack the enemy in rear while we were moving on his flank. That command captured and killed 60 of the enemy. Near Mr. Bott's house, the Fourth and Fifth were charged in flank by the Eighteenth Pennsylvania cavalry
Hampton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
valry were active in many of the engagements during the fall campaign in Virginia. At Jack's shop, near Liberty mills, Orange county, Va., on September 22, 1863, Hampton's division of cavalry joined battle with Davies' and Custer's brigades of Kilpatrick's cavalry division. Custer's brigade was commanded by Colonel Stagg. HamptoHampton's division was composed of three brigades: Butler's, commanded by Col. J. B. Gordon of the First North Carolina; Jones' brigade, and Baker's North Carolina brigade (afterward Gordon's), commanded by Colonel Ferebee of the Fourth North Carolina. This brigade included these regiments: The First, Second, Fourth and Fifth. As thwas in front of Kilpatrick's division, received a note from General Fitzhugh Lee stating that he was moving to join his commander, and suggesting that Stuart with Hampton's division should retire in the direction of Warrenton, drawing the enemy after him. This being done, Lee was to come in from Auburn and attack in flank and rear
Morris Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
er force at all hours. In addition, the water was bad, food insufficient, and the heat in the pits and bombproofs almost intolerable. Battery Wagner was, says Lieutenant McKethan, a field work of sand, turf and palmetto logs, built across Morris island. From north to south it varied from twenty to seventy-five yards. Its bombproofs were capable of holding from 800 to 1,000 men. Its armament was far inferior in range to the guns of the Federals, and so we had to submit to the hail of iron m the 18th of July to the 6th of September, when it was evacuated, the troops serving in the fort had arduous duties. Ludgwig, in his Regimental History of the Eighth regiment describes the routine of duty there: The nature of the service on Morris island was such as to render it necessary for the regiments composing the army on that side of Charleston to perform duty there alternately. While on the island the men were exposed at all times to the enemy's fire, both from land and sea. An attac
Yazoo River (United States) (search for this): chapter 13
ourth Georgia regiments, who constituted the advance pickets and reserve. Circumstances in North Carolina were such that, in November, Clingman's men gladly received orders to leave tire island and return to their native State. The brigade loss during its service in South Carolina was: killed, 76; wounded, 336. Three North Carolina regiments served under J. E. Johnston in Mississippi. These were the Twenty-ninth, Lieut.-Col. W. B. Creasman, the Thirty-ninth and the Sixtieth. On the Yazoo river, near Yazoo City, the Twenty-ninth had, on the 13th of July, an all-day skirmish with gunboats. In the same month, the Sixtieth regiment was engaged in actions of some severity before Jackson. These regiments were greater sufferers from the hardships of campaigning than they were from battle casualties, as it was their lot not to be engaged during this time in serious battle. The Great Battle of the West was fought near Chickamauga. There the Confederate army, under General Bragg, g
Liberty Mills (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
d many were killed and wounded. The North Carolina loss was 6 killed and 15 wounded. Shortly afterward the Sixty-ninth regiment encountered a large cavalry force under Foster. This cavalry had been sent to intercept the Confederate retreat toward Virginia. Colonel Love gallantly charged this force, and General Williams coming to his aid, drove it from his front. North Carolina cavalry were active in many of the engagements during the fall campaign in Virginia. At Jack's shop, near Liberty mills, Orange county, Va., on September 22, 1863, Hampton's division of cavalry joined battle with Davies' and Custer's brigades of Kilpatrick's cavalry division. Custer's brigade was commanded by Colonel Stagg. Hampton's division was composed of three brigades: Butler's, commanded by Col. J. B. Gordon of the First North Carolina; Jones' brigade, and Baker's North Carolina brigade (afterward Gordon's), commanded by Colonel Ferebee of the Fourth North Carolina. This brigade included these r
Brandy Station (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
the crossing of Buford's cavalry division at Morton's and Raccoon fords. The brigades of Buford that had crossed over were driven back. The Fifth, Twenty-third and five companies of the Twelfth regiment, under Colonel Garrett, crossed at Raccoon ford, and the Twentieth and five companies of the Twelfth crossed at Morton's ford, and followed the Federals to Stevensburg. These regiments succeeded in forcing the enemy to retire. The loss in the brigade was 4 killed and 38 wounded. At Brandy Station, General Gordon reports: Near Bradford's house I sent the First North Carolina cavalry to attack the enemy in rear while we were moving on his flank. That command captured and killed 60 of the enemy. Near Mr. Bott's house, the Fourth and Fifth were charged in flank by the Eighteenth Pennsylvania cavalry, and broke in considerable confusion. The brigade took no further active [part in the] operations during the day. While making a reconnaissance toward Catlett's Station on the night
Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
Eighth, Colonel Shaw; the Thirty-first, Lieut.-Col. C. W. Knight; the Fifty-first, Colonel McKethan; the Sixty-first, Colonel Radcliffe, Lieutenant-Colonel Devane and Major Harding, was ordered to South Carolina to assist in the defense of Charleston harbor. The brigade arrived on the 13th, and was at once assigned to duty. The Fifty-first and Thirty-first became members of the garrison at Fort Wagner. The Eighth and Sixty-first went to James island. At Battery Wagner the garrison endured anced at a double-quick, but broke at the ditch of Wagner under the withering fire of the Charleston battalion and the Fifty-first North Carolina, and, says Major Johnson, rushed like a crowd of maniacs back to the rear. The Defense of Charleston Harbor, p. 104. Colonel Shaw was killed; and as his men, with a few brave exceptions, rushed back, they, General Seymour reported, fell harshly upon those in their rear. The other regiments of Strong's brigade continued their forward movement, bu
Warrenton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
hill just opposite to us, stacked arms, and went to making coffee. This operation had considerably progressed when a sharp volley of musketry was heard on the Warrenton road. I waited until it appeared more general, when, believing that it was our attack in earnest, I opened seven guns upon the enemy and rained a storm of canis from General Fitzhugh Lee stating that he was moving to join his commander, and suggesting that Stuart with Hampton's division should retire in the direction of Warrenton, drawing the enemy after him. This being done, Lee was to come in from Auburn and attack in flank and rear while Stuart attacked in front. General Stuart's repoith such impetuosity, the First North Carolina gallantly leading, that the enemy broke and the rout was soon complete. I pursued them from within three miles of Warrenton to Buckland, the horses going at full speed the whole distance. General Stuart quotes from a Northern writer, who speaks of Kilpatrick's retreat as the deplorab
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
er, a great, but entirely barren victory. North Carolina was not largely represented in this bitterthe next day, the location occupied by the North Carolina troops, we had their full concurrence and field and marked the points reached by the North Carolina troops had met them in actual conflict. Iersonally cognizant of each achievement of North Carolina troops as set forth in the tablet erected.and a hurrah for the Bonnie Blue Flag, the North Carolina boys made the charge, and the enemy fled bred and many were killed and wounded. The North Carolina loss was 6 killed and 15 wounded. Shortly lmost entirely, on the Confederate side, a North Carolina battle; for the two brigades that did nearbears testimony to the fearlessness of the North Carolina men in their attacks. He reports, the-enellers also received a terrible wound. The North Carolina losses in these engagements were: killed, ire, but not seriously engaged. The total North Carolina casualties in the infantry were: killed, 1[4 more...]
Kelly's Ford (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
issippi the battle of Chickamauga east Tennessee campaigning North Carolina cavalry in Virginia infantry engagements around Rappahannock Station fights at Kelly's ford, Bristoe and Payne's Farm. On the 16th of July, Clingman's brigade, consisting of the following North Carolina regiments, the Eighth, Colonel Shaw; the Thir to direct a successful fire upon the assailants of its comrades across the river. On this same date, the Federals succeeded in crossing the Rappahannock at Kelly's ford notwithstanding the efforts of Rodes' division, which was guarding several fords along the river, to prevent it. The troops most actively engaged at Kelly's foKelly's ford were the Second North Carolina, commanded at the opening of the affair by Colonel Cox, then, upon that officer's being wounded, by Lieutenant-Colonel Stallings, and the Thirtieth North Carolina, Lieutenant-Colonel Sillers commanding. Colonel Sillers also received a terrible wound. The North Carolina losses in these engagement
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