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Green (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 100
Cave City. Two days later General Bragg moved up with the greater part of his army and surrounded these troops, then reinforced and commanded by Colonel C. L. Dunham. For this purpose he crossed a part of Polk's corps to the north side of Green river, and upon the eminences there had placed a number of field pieces completely commanding the fortifications below, with instructions to open fire at early dawn the next (17th) morning. Surrounded by overwhelming numbers, and realizing their utte of my State the following resolution, which passed both branches of the Legislature, and became a law by the prompt and cordial approval of the Governor, February 7, 1884. whereas, in the fatal and unfortunate battle of Munfordsville, on Green river, Kentucky, on the 14th of September, 1862, quite a number of soldiers from Mississippi, belonging to the Seventh, Ninth, Tenth, Twenty-ninth and Forty-fourth Mississippi regiments, gave up their lives in the service of the State, and by their
Glasgow (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 100
ly yielded my assent to the invitation extended to me a few weeks ago by letter from Mr. James Smith, written from Glasgow, Scotland, to be present at this time and perform the ceremony of unveiling the monument erected by him in memory of the sacrhe firm, he was at a comparatively early age placed in sole charge of the prosperous business. That brother writes from Glasgow: In 1855, young as he then was, I parted with my business in Jackson to him, while I removed thence to live here. I vis. Immediately prior to entering Kentucky Colonel Smith had been ordered to resume command of his regiment. On reaching Glasgow with his main force September 12, 1862, General Bragg ordered forward the same night Chalmers's brigade of Mississippiahad pledged its sacred honor, reflected new and enduring luster upon its name; and, whereas, Mr. James Smith, of Glasgow, Scotland, once an honored citizen of Mississippi, and now, as always, interested in everything that contributes to the glor
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 100
among the first to enter service, and under his command it formed the first military escort of the President of the Confederate States when that great chief was called from his plantation to take the reins of Government. From that time onward, in casition they kept up their fire, and soon had the Federals so they dared not raise their heads above the parapet. The United States flag flying above the fort was riddled by the bullets from Walthall's guns They had been in this position only a shorft with the following inscription: Erected to the memory of Colonel R. A. Smith, of the Tenth Mississippi regiment, Confederate States army, a native of Edinburgh, who fell mortally wounded in the battle of Munfordsville, Ky., September 14, 1862, whind mementoes have passed between us, I feel that as individuals and as Mississippians, yea, as citizens of the late Confederate States, we behold a friend, a benefactor and a patriot, and one whose philanthropy and generous love is something too pure
Montgomery (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 100
n felt that behind the reserved and self-possessed exterior of Robert A. Smith dwelt the qualities of the true soldier. Thus it was that on the first mutterings of the coming storm he was elected Captain of the Mississippi Rifles, a company organized in and composed of his fellow citizens of Jackson, whose services were tendered to the State as soon as she cast her fortunes with the Confederacy, and whose first duty was to escort the newly elected President to the seat of government at Montgomery, Ala. At the first call of the Confederacy on Mississippi for troops in March, 1861, he was ordered with his company to Pensacola navy yard, where General Bragg was organizing his heroic little army, that was subsequently to become so justly famous in the annals of war. This call resulted in the assembling of twenty companies from Mississippi, at Pensacola, which were organized into two regiments and named the Ninth and Tenth. The Mississippi Rifles, as Company D, formed a part of this latte
Edinburg (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 100
e a retrospect, limited by the proprieties of the occasion, of what transpired here twenty-two years ago, and the prominent figure to whom our thoughts now revert. Colonel Robert Alexander Smith was born on the 5th day of April, 1836, in Edinburg, Scotland. He was the youngest of five sons and five daughters of James and Annie Smith, of that city. The father, a Paisley manufacturer in early life, and later a wholesale druggist, still lives in his hale and hearty old age of ninety-three, at ederate States army, a native of Edinburgh, who fell mortally wounded in the battle of Munfordsville, Ky., September 14, 1862, while gallantly leading in the charge. Aged twenty-six years. Erected by his fellow-citizens. In Dean cemetery, Edinburg, Scotland, a similar monument with almost like inscription can be seen, which a brother's love erected as a tribute of his grief and reverence. Having been first the color-bearer, then adjutant of his regiment by appointment of Colonel Smith, and
Louisville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 100
neral Bragg ordered forward the same night Chalmers's brigade of Mississippians to the railroad at Cave City, and Duncan's Louisiana brigade to the junction next south, with instructions to intercept and cut Buell's communications by rail with Louisville. General Chalmers surprised and captured the telegraph operator and depot of supplies at Cave City, but, because information as to our movements had been, in some manner, communicated to the Federals, he did not succeed in capturing any train.nd, yielded before day on the morning of the 17th to the demand of General Bragg for their surrender. The troops surrendered consisted of the Seventeenth, Forty-third, Sixty-seventh, Sixty-eighth and Sixty-ninth Indiana Regiments, a company of Louisville cavalry, a part of the Fourth Ohio and a section of the Thirteenth Indiana battery, amounting in all to about 4500 men and ten guns, together with a large supply of Quartermaster and Commissary stores. At an early hour on the morning of Wedne
E. S. Sadley (search for this): chapter 100
ne; Company F, Martin Cantrell; Company L, Patrick Britt, August Levesa—5. Seventh Regiment.—Company A, Corporal J. V. Whittington; Company C, W. C. Little, T. F. Reynolds, F. W. Cox, W. R. Ratcliff; Company K, W. H. Durham. Ninth Regiment.—Company A, J. Davis; Company F, Archibald B. Wright; Company H, A. T. Dennis, V. A. Carraway, L. K. A. Pearce, Richard Scott; Company I, T. C. Bardin; Company K, W. C. Nesbitt, J. J. Laughter. Tenth Regiment.—Colonel R. A. Smith, mortally wounded, died afterward; Lieutenant-Colonel Bullard; Company B, R. A. Pasko; Company C, Thomas J. Brown, H. E. Barten, Joseph Pruden, James Buchanan; Company D, John Murphy; Company E, Sergeant Lem. Supples; Company I, W. T. Holloway; Company K, Ira Cole, A. T. Johnson, F. L. Kelly, W. R. Turner, William M. Drury, J. J. Keith. Twenty-ninth Regiment.—Company B, A. J. Burnett, E. S. Sadley, A. W. Squires; Company G, Corporal H. Russiale, John Williams, John Yeager; Company K, C. R. Dowsing, R.
A. T. Johnson (search for this): chapter 100
e; Company F, Martin Cantrell; Company L, Patrick Britt, August Levesa—5. Seventh Regiment.—Company A, Corporal J. V. Whittington; Company C, W. C. Little, T. F. Reynolds, F. W. Cox, W. R. Ratcliff; Company K, W. H. Durham. Ninth Regiment.—Company A, J. Davis; Company F, Archibald B. Wright; Company H, A. T. Dennis, V. A. Carraway, L. K. A. Pearce, Richard Scott; Company I, T. C. Bardin; Company K, W. C. Nesbitt, J. J. Laughter. Tenth Regiment.—Colonel R. A. Smith, mortally wounded, died afterward; Lieutenant-Colonel Bullard; Company B, R. A. Pasko; Company C, Thomas J. Brown, H. E. Barten, Joseph Pruden, James Buchanan; Company D, John Murphy; Company E, Sergeant Lem. Supples; Company I, W. T. Holloway; Company K, Ira Cole, A. T. Johnson, F. L. Kelly, W. R. Turner, William M. Drury, J. J. Keith. Twenty-ninth Regiment.—Company B, A. J. Burnett, E. S. Sadley, A. W. Squires; Company G, Corporal H. Russiale, John Williams, John Yeager; Company K, C. R. Dowsing, R.
R. A. Pasko (search for this): chapter 100
e; Company F, Martin Cantrell; Company L, Patrick Britt, August Levesa—5. Seventh Regiment.—Company A, Corporal J. V. Whittington; Company C, W. C. Little, T. F. Reynolds, F. W. Cox, W. R. Ratcliff; Company K, W. H. Durham. Ninth Regiment.—Company A, J. Davis; Company F, Archibald B. Wright; Company H, A. T. Dennis, V. A. Carraway, L. K. A. Pearce, Richard Scott; Company I, T. C. Bardin; Company K, W. C. Nesbitt, J. J. Laughter. Tenth Regiment.—Colonel R. A. Smith, mortally wounded, died afterward; Lieutenant-Colonel Bullard; Company B, R. A. Pasko; Company C, Thomas J. Brown, H. E. Barten, Joseph Pruden, James Buchanan; Company D, John Murphy; Company E, Sergeant Lem. Supples; Company I, W. T. Holloway; Company K, Ira Cole, A. T. Johnson, F. L. Kelly, W. R. Turner, William M. Drury, J. J. Keith. Twenty-ninth Regiment.—Company B, A. J. Burnett, E. S. Sadley, A. W. Squires; Company G, Corporal H. Russiale, John Williams, John Yeager; Company K, C. R. Dowsing, R.
J. V. Whittington (search for this): chapter 100
ge of patriotism and renown which most nations may well covet, and which you cannot too highly prize. Casualties in battle of Munfordsville. Grand total: killed, 40; wounded, 211. Field Officers: 1 killed, 2 mortally wounded, and 1 severely wounded; total, 4. Names of the killed. Blythe's Regiment.—Company B, Corporal Whitter; Company D, Second Lieutenant James Paine; Company F, Martin Cantrell; Company L, Patrick Britt, August Levesa—5. Seventh Regiment.—Company A, Corporal J. V. Whittington; Company C, W. C. Little, T. F. Reynolds, F. W. Cox, W. R. Ratcliff; Company K, W. H. Durham. Ninth Regiment.—Company A, J. Davis; Company F, Archibald B. Wright; Company H, A. T. Dennis, V. A. Carraway, L. K. A. Pearce, Richard Scott; Company I, T. C. Bardin; Company K, W. C. Nesbitt, J. J. Laughter. Tenth Regiment.—Colonel R. A. Smith, mortally wounded, died afterward; Lieutenant-Colonel Bullard; Company B, R. A. Pasko; Company C, Thomas J. Brown, H. E. Barten, Joseph P
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