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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). Search the whole document.

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Chickahominy (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
McClellan on the 19th of May master of the Chickahominy pass at Bottom's Bridge. Free to seek a nee the forest again enfolds the banks of the Chickahominy, and does not leave it for ten kilometres l Everything indicated that the banks of the Chickahominy were soon to be ensanguined by a desperate eft, thrown over the unfriendly bank of the Chickahominy, and inactive for the last seven days, occug ground gradually on the right bank of the Chickahominy, and after each step taken on that side to es almost isolated on the right bank of the Chickahominy did not amount to forty-five thousand men, o find themselves on the right banks of the Chickahominy at daybreak, with all the disposable portio whole of his army on the right bank of the Chickahominy, and, if forced by circumstances, proceed iand of the crossing to the left bank of the Chickahominy by a portion of the Confederate army, knew olume, p. 340. On the other bank of the Chickahominy, as soon as the sun of the 28th began to sh[5 more...]
Greenbrier (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
sand men. More to the west, Fremont with the army of the Mountain, so called, occupied West Virginia, which the Confederates had entirely abandoned since the end of January. One of his brigades, commanded by Crook, was posted on the banks of Greenbrier River, while the remainder of his troops were encamped at Moorefield, and Franklin in some of the numerous valleys which stretch between the ridges of the Alleghanies. The President, after taking away Blenker's division from the army of the Potomd after a bloody struggle, in which he had more than one hundred men disabled, and left four hundred prisoners in the hands of the Federals. The remainder of his brigade, reduced by nearly one-half, was indebted for its safety solely to the Greenbrier River, the bridges of which it succeeded in destroying in its rear. But this advantage was of no benefit whatever to the Federals; for Crook was not sufficiently strong to venture among the difficult mountain passes which separated him from Jacks
Gaines Mill (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
eaver-dam Creek, between Mechanicsville and Gaines' Mill, and on the right bank a vast wooded swamp,the left bank as far as the neighborhood of Gaines' Mill, had already constructed two bridges in conllan, who was sick at his headquarters near Gaines' Mill, had heard nothing from Heintzelman, to whowhole right wing. From his headquarters at Gaines' Mill he could see the smoke, which rose above they had put in motion the troops encamped at Gaines' Mill, on the evening of the 31st, or during the es to the course of the river, and on which Gaines' Mill is situated; but it had been laid out two otened to join the rest of Porter's corps at Gaines' Mill without being pursued. At noon on the 27ed. The resistance made by the Federals at Gaines' Mill, and their inaction on the other side of th been besieged in turn by the conquerors of Gaines' Mill; he would thereby have sacrificed his commuhe Chickahominy with his whole army between Gaines' Mill and Bottom's Bridge, and tried to force a p[17 more...]
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ead of Jackson's column bore the same name as the one he was about to attack, the First Maryland. This unfortunate State of Maryland, convulsed by conflicting passions, inflamed by its neighbors of the North on one side and by those of the South on to a slave State, when found fighting under the Federal flag, were nothing but traitors in their eyes. The Federals of Maryland, on the contrary, regarded their fellow-citizens who had enlisted in the Southern army as twofold rebels: first, agains Jackson, in spite of his desire to invade the Northern States and the ardor which seized him as soon as he drew near to Maryland, was preparing to slip away from his adversaries by a speedy retreat before the latter had time to concentrate a superient he confirmed all the alarms and anxieties into which his opponents had been thrown by his late successes in menacing Maryland and Washington; he magnified the number of his forces in their imagination, thus relieving Richmond, and securing for hi
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
hmond, where it was receiving reinforcements forwarded in haste from every section of the country. Huger arrived with twelve thousand men from Norfolk; Branch, whose defeat at Newberne by Burnside we have noticed, brought nine thousand from North Carolina, and others were yet to follow. The reconnaissances of the Federal army had revealed the fact that the abandonment of Bottom's Bridge was the last step in Johnston's retreat. The latter was preparing for the defence of Meadow Bridge and Newn interrupted by Sumner against their left wing. It must be acknowledged, however, that the chances were greatly in his favor. Huger had made his appearance after the battle, and Generals Holmes and Ripley had just arrived in Richmond from North Carolina with eight thousand men. This timely reinforcement would perhaps permit them to resume the attack with greater hope of success, as the rise in the river rendered the position of the Federals more difficult. But in the absence of Johnston, wh
Lewisburg (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
e in allowing himself to be surprised. He was only captured after being seriously wounded. The fickle fortune of war decreed that on the same day a body of troops detached from Jackson's army should experience nearly as bloody a check in the mountains of West Virginia. On leaving these mountains, Edward Johnson had entrusted to General Heth the task of watching with three regiments the brigade of Colonel Crook, which occupied the beautiful valley of the Greenbrier, with its station at Lewisburg. Carried away by his zeal, Heth crossed the river to attack his adversary in that position. He was repulsed after a bloody struggle, in which he had more than one hundred men disabled, and left four hundred prisoners in the hands of the Federals. The remainder of his brigade, reduced by nearly one-half, was indebted for its safety solely to the Greenbrier River, the bridges of which it succeeded in destroying in its rear. But this advantage was of no benefit whatever to the Federals; f
Ripley (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
r junction by way of Ellyson's Mills. McCall had entrusted Reynolds' brigade with the defence of the first pass, while Seymour was directed to guard the second. His third brigade, commanded by Meade, was held in reserve. A. P. Hill, having reached the Mechanicsville heights, deployed his division, nearly fourteen thousand men strong, in front of the formidable positions occupied by the Federals. His namesake, D. H. Hill, followed in his rear for the purpose of extending to the left, with Ripley's brigade in advance. Lee directed in person all the movements which were to place his army in line. President Davis had come out of Richmond to witness the first act of this great conflict. The Confederates knew that it was easy to turn the position of the Federals by attacking it from the north. If McCall was supported on that side—that is to say, on his right—by considerable forces, Jackson could not fail to meet it on his route, and the noise of cannon would soon apprise his chief o
Jackson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ance by Fremont as soon as he was informed of Jackson's appearance, and which had arrived after a moincidence the regiment placed at the head of Jackson's column bore the same name as the one he wasn the same day a body of troops detached from Jackson's army should experience nearly as bloody a ccult mountain passes which separated him from Jackson's base of operations, and which it would haveThe fate of Richmond trembled in the balance; Jackson's column, thrown at a lucky moment into the p of those who directed the operations against Jackson from Washington, this general might yet have g. These brave troops dismounted and covered Jackson's retreat by an energetic resistance; but thed his march, was pressing him in the rear. Jackson's situation was again full of peril. Leavingunder the impression that he had the whole of Jackson's army before him, allowed himself to be held: Gaines' Mill. THE alarms occasioned by Jackson's success did not prevent the battle of Fair [2 more...]
Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
the left. Jackson pushed one of his brigades to the assault of these positions, and after a desperate struggle the Confederates took possession of them, together with three pieces of artillery which were found in them. Being turned on this side, Tyler was obliged to fight in retreat, and fell back in good order toward the hamlet of Conrad's Store, occupied by the remainder of Shields' division. His soldiers, who had been recruited among the pioneers of the West, and especially in the State of Ohio, had fought with great determination; they had inflicted a loss of six hundred men upon an enemy three or four times their number. The battle of Port Republic ended the pursuit of Jackson. Fremont had witnessed its termination from the other side of the Shenandoah without being able to cross the river in time to participate in it. He withdrew, and Jackson, being master of the battle-field, gave some rest to his troops before entering on a new campaign. This time his course lay in th
Hampton Roads (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
nt destined to influence military operations to a considerable extent, of which the President was yet ignorant, and the merits of which General Wool could not appropriate to himself. The Virginia was no longer in existence. That formidable vessel had been abandoned and destroyed by her crew. On the 9th of May she was the last to come out of that port of Norfolk, whence, during two months, she had held the whole Federal fleet in check. Was she to make a desperate attempt to steam into Hampton Roads, and thence either to gain the open sea or run the risk of being surrounded by the debris of that fleet and perish? Or was it not better to reascend the James River, so as to keep the Federal navy away from Richmond? Tatnall adopted the latter course. In order to get over the sand-banks of the river more easily, he lightened the ship, in pursuance of his pilot's advice, by landing the guns, ammunition and all the war materiel he had on board. But when on the 11th, this operation co
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