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Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
the union of the provinces throughout the continent. Stratford, in Con- chap. XXIV.} 1766. Mar. necticut, resolved never to be wanting, and advised a firm and lasting union, to be fostered by a mutual correspondence among all the true Sons of Liberty throughout the continent. Assembling at Canterbury in March, Windham county named Israel Putnam, of Pomfret, and Hugh Ledlie, of Windham, to correspond with the neighboring provinces. Delegates from the Sons of Liberty in every town of Connecticut met at Hartford; and this solemn convention of one of the most powerful colonies, a new spectacle in the political world, demonstrating the facility with which America could organize independent governments, declared for perpetuating the Union as the only security for liberty; and they named in behalf of the colony, Colonel Israel Putnam, Major John Durkee, Captain Hugh Ledlie, and five others, their committee for that purpose. A firm union of all the colonies was the watchword of Rhod
Pomfret (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
ds. The in fluence of the Sons of Liberty spread on every side Following their advice, the people of Woodbridge, in New Jersey, recommended the union of the provinces throughout the continent. Stratford, in Con- chap. XXIV.} 1766. Mar. necticut, resolved never to be wanting, and advised a firm and lasting union, to be fostered by a mutual correspondence among all the true Sons of Liberty throughout the continent. Assembling at Canterbury in March, Windham county named Israel Putnam, of Pomfret, and Hugh Ledlie, of Windham, to correspond with the neighboring provinces. Delegates from the Sons of Liberty in every town of Connecticut met at Hartford; and this solemn convention of one of the most powerful colonies, a new spectacle in the political world, demonstrating the facility with which America could organize independent governments, declared for perpetuating the Union as the only security for liberty; and they named in behalf of the colony, Colonel Israel Putnam, Major John
Newcastle (Canada) (search for this): chapter 24
esbyterians to the north of the Tweed. Moffat to Stiles, 18 March, 1766. A change of ministry was more and more spoken of. The nation demanded to see Pitt in the government; and two of the ablest members of the cabinet, Grafton and Conway, continued to insist upon it. But Rockingham, who, during the repeal of the Stamp Act, had been dumb, leaving the brunt of the battle to be borne by Camden and Shelburne, was determined it should not be so; Grafton to Conway, 22 April, 1766. and Newcastle and Winchelsea and Egmont concurred with him. De Guerchy to Choiseul, 21 April, 1766. To be pre- chap. XXIV.} 1766. April. pared for the change, and in the hope of becoming, under the new administration, secretary for the colonies, Charles Townshend assiduously courted the Duke of Grafton. Pitt, on retiring to recruit the health which his unparalleled exertions in the winter had utterly subverted, made a farewell speech, his last in the House of Commons, wishing that faction might c
Canada (Canada) (search for this): chapter 24
Hanover to the British throne. While he was enforcing his sanguinary amend ment, the American colonies were everywhere in concert putting a denial on the pretension, and choosing the risk of civil war and independence, rather than compliance. Canada, Nova Scotia, and the Floridas, which were military governments, had submitted; the rest of the continent was firm. Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Maryland had opened their courts. From New-York, the Governor reported that he was left entireld just sense of liberty in any country than has appeared in America within the year past. Such were Mayhew's words; and while all the continent was calling out and cherishing the name of Pitt, the greatest statesman of England, the conqueror of Canada and chap. XXIV} 1766. May. the Ohio, the founder of empire, the apostle of freedom;—To you, said Mayhew, speaking from the heart of the people, and as if its voice could be heard across the ocean, to you grateful America attributes that she is
Providence County (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
e of the most powerful colonies, a new spectacle in the political world, demonstrating the facility with which America could organize independent governments, declared for perpetuating the Union as the only security for liberty; and they named in behalf of the colony, Colonel Israel Putnam, Major John Durkee, Captain Hugh Ledlie, and five others, their committee for that purpose. A firm union of all the colonies was the watchword of Rhode Island, adopted in a convention of the county of Providence; and it was resolved to oppose the Stamp Act, even if it should tend to the destruction of the union of America with Great Britain. At Boston, Otis declared, that the original equality of the species was not a mere chimera. Otis in Boston Gazette. Joseph Warren, a young man whom nature had adorned with grace, and manly beauty, and a courage that would have been rash audacity had it not been tempered by self-control, saw clearly that the more equal division of property among the peopl
Stratford (Canada) (search for this): chapter 24
hing but a superior force would bring the people to a sense of duty; that every one around him was an abettor of resistance. Moore to Conway, 20 Feb., 1766. A merchant, who had signed a stamped bond for a Mediterranean pass, was obliged to stand forth publicly, and ask forgiveness before thousands. The in fluence of the Sons of Liberty spread on every side Following their advice, the people of Woodbridge, in New Jersey, recommended the union of the provinces throughout the continent. Stratford, in Con- chap. XXIV.} 1766. Mar. necticut, resolved never to be wanting, and advised a firm and lasting union, to be fostered by a mutual correspondence among all the true Sons of Liberty throughout the continent. Assembling at Canterbury in March, Windham county named Israel Putnam, of Pomfret, and Hugh Ledlie, of Windham, to correspond with the neighboring provinces. Delegates from the Sons of Liberty in every town of Connecticut met at Hartford; and this solemn convention of one of
Westminster (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
any obvious reasons, alluding to the known opinion of the king, would be peculiarly chap. XXIV.} 1766. Mar. proper, we in effect annihilate this branch of the legislature, and vote ourselves useless. The people of England had once adopted that opinion. It was certain that the people of America were already convinced that the House of Lords had outlived its functions, and was for them become worse than useless. On the morning of the eighteenth day of March, the king went in state to Westminster, and gave his assent, among other bills, to what ever after he regarded as the well-spring of all his sorrows, the fatal repeal of the Stamp Act. He returned from signing the repeal, amid the shouts and huzzas of the applauding multitude. There was a public dinner of the friends of America in honor of the event; Bow bells were set a ringing; and on the Thames the ships displayed all their colors. At night a bonfire was kindled, and houses were illuminated all over the city. An expre
Rhode Island (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
denial on the pretension, and choosing the risk of civil war and independence, rather than compliance. Canada, Nova Scotia, and the Floridas, which were military governments, had submitted; the rest of the continent was firm. Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Maryland had opened their courts. From New-York, the Governor reported that he was left entirely to himself; that nothing but a superior force would bring the people to a sense of duty; that every one around him was an abettor of resistas the only security for liberty; and they named in behalf of the colony, Colonel Israel Putnam, Major John Durkee, Captain Hugh Ledlie, and five others, their committee for that purpose. A firm union of all the colonies was the watchword of Rhode Island, adopted in a convention of the county of Providence; and it was resolved to oppose the Stamp Act, even if it should tend to the destruction of the union of America with Great Britain. At Boston, Otis declared, that the original equality of
South Mills (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
of the House of Commons, and the powers of government were actually sequestered into the hands of about two hundred men. Camden spoke deliberately, and his words were of the greater moment, as they were the fruit of a month's reflection and research, and the lords sat between eleven and twelve hours, which was later than ever was remembered. Once more Mansfield and Camden exerted all their powers on opposite sides; while Temple indulged in personalities, aimed at Camden. The submission ofCamden. The submission of the Americans, argued the Duke of Bedford, who closed the debate, is the palladium, which if suffered to be removed, will put a final period to the British empire in America. To a modification of the duties I would not have been unfavorable; but a a loyal inscription; the houses round Liberty Tree exhibited illuminated figures, not of the king only, but of Pitt, and Camden, and Barre; and Liberty Tree itself was decorated with lanterns, till its boughs could hold no more. All the wisest ag
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
l a crime to dispute the validity of the Stamp Act as to question the right of the House of Hanover to the British throne. While he was enforcing his sanguinary amend ment, the American colonies were everywhere in concert putting a denial on the pretension, and choosing the risk of civil war and independence, rather than compliance. Canada, Nova Scotia, and the Floridas, which were military governments, had submitted; the rest of the continent was firm. Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Maryland had opened their courts. From New-York, the Governor reported that he was left entirely to himself; that nothing but a superior force would bring the people to a sense of duty; that every one around him was an abettor of resistance. Moore to Conway, 20 Feb., 1766. A merchant, who had signed a stamped bond for a Mediterranean pass, was obliged to stand forth publicly, and ask forgiveness before thousands. The in fluence of the Sons of Liberty spread on every side Following their advice,
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