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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 22, 1861., [Electronic resource].

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under the resolution adopted yesterday. The President said the resolution authorized the publication of the debates. He would make no contract inconsistent with the resolution. Mr. Johnson expressed himself as satisfied with the reply. Committee on compensation. The President announced the following committee, under a resolution adopted yesterday, to inquire and report upon the compensation for the officers of the Convention: Messrs. Johnson of Richmond, Hubbard of Ohio, Gregory of King William, Coffman of Rockingham, and Sheffey of Smythe. Mr. Montague, of Middlesex, in the Chair. Report from the Committee on elections. Mr. Haymond, from the Committee on Elections, submitted a report embodying "a list of the persons who seem to have been elected to the Convention, and the certificates of such election." The Committee add: John D. Sharp is elected from the county of Lee, but his seat in the Convention is contested by M. B. D. Lane, of said county of L
er the delivery of such notice. The word reasonable, as used in this ordinance, shall be construed with reference to the circumstances attending each case, the condition of the parties, and the fact that this ordinance has not been adopted until now, so as to prevent, as far as practicable, surprise to the parties. This ordinance shall apply to contests now pending, as well as those which may hereafter be commenced. The ordinance was adopted. Committee on Federal Relations. Mr. Conrad, of Frederick, from the Committee on Federal Relations, stated that the Committee had been in constant session every morning, yet owing to the difficulty and magnitude of the subjects before it, had made but little progress. He was therefore instructed to offer the following resolution: Resolved, That the Committee on Federal Relations have leave to sit during the sessions of this Convention, until further ordered. The resolution was adopted. Personal explanation. Mr. E
sh copies for mailing at two cents each, and to republish the matter in such convenient form for binding as may be ordered by the Convention. Mr. Montague said that the Convention, by its vote, had determined to publish the proceedings, and had indicated the Enquirer as the organ of publication. He moved, by way of relieving the President from his difficulty, that the Secretary of the Commonwealth, who had large experience in such matters, be authorized to execute the contract. Mr. Staples moved as an amendment that the subject be referred to a committee of five. Mr. Wise maintained that any change in the resolution would be out of order. Mr. Clemens, rising to a question of order, said the motion of the gentleman from Middlesex, as well as the amendment of the gentleman from Patrick, were inconsistent with the resolution adopted by the Convention. In order to entertain such motions the resolution would have to be reconsidered. After further remarks and sugg
on's birthday. Mr. Carlile said that as the Committee on Federal Relations would not probably be prepared to report before Monday, previous to which there was not much necessity for debate; and to-morrow being the 22d of February, when, he presumed, some of us would like to have an opportunity to read the Farewell Address of the Father of his Country, he would offer the following resolution: Resolved, That when this Convention adjourn, it adjourn to meet again on Monday next. Mr. Fisher moved to amend by inserting "Saturday" in the place of Monday. Mr. Hall, of Wetzel, was opposed to adjourning over at all. It was rumored that the Peace Conference was about to conclude its labors, and he thought no time should be lost, in view of that fact. If the gentleman from Harrison (Mr. Carlile) wanted to hear Washington's Farewell Address, he would agree to go to his room and read it to him. Mr. Dorman explained why he should vote against adjourning over to Monday. A re
if necessary. He spoke for his own people, and he believed such was the sentiment of the whole Trans-Allegheny region. He alluded, in eloquent terms, to their record of the past, and said if it was a fault to love the Union, they had learned it from the great men who laid the foundation of the Government. Mr. W. quoted with much effect, in enlarging upon this point, from Washington's Farewell Address, and from the words of Clay after the passage of the Compromise measures of 1850. Mr. Goode, of Mecklenburg, made some remarks, in which he also dwelt upon the glories of the past; but said that his constituents, smarting under the wrongs of the Black Republican party, were prepared to resist. Mr. Woods' resolutions were then referred to the Committee on Federal Relations. Washington's birthday. Mr. Carlile said that as the Committee on Federal Relations would not probably be prepared to report before Monday, previous to which there was not much necessity for debate
d the resolution authorized the publication of the debates. He would make no contract inconsistent with the resolution. Mr. Johnson expressed himself as satisfied with the reply. Committee on compensation. The President announced the following committee, under a resolution adopted yesterday, to inquire and report upon the compensation for the officers of the Convention: Messrs. Johnson of Richmond, Hubbard of Ohio, Gregory of King William, Coffman of Rockingham, and Sheffey of Smythe. Mr. Montague, of Middlesex, in the Chair. Report from the Committee on elections. Mr. Haymond, from the Committee on Elections, submitted a report embodying "a list of the persons who seem to have been elected to the Convention, and the certificates of such election." The Committee add: John D. Sharp is elected from the county of Lee, but his seat in the Convention is contested by M. B. D. Lane, of said county of Lee, and his petition and notice of contest has been referred to
Convention, by its vote, had determined to publish the proceedings, and had indicated the Enquirer as the organ of publication. He moved, by way of relieving the President from his difficulty, that the Secretary of the Commonwealth, who had large experience in such matters, be authorized to execute the contract. Mr. Staples moved as an amendment that the subject be referred to a committee of five. Mr. Wise maintained that any change in the resolution would be out of order. Mr. Clemens, rising to a question of order, said the motion of the gentleman from Middlesex, as well as the amendment of the gentleman from Patrick, were inconsistent with the resolution adopted by the Convention. In order to entertain such motions the resolution would have to be reconsidered. After further remarks and suggestions, the President remarked that he would proceed to execute the contract, as directed by the resolution. Mr. Johnson, of Richmond, said he had voted for the resolut
sident said the resolution authorized the publication of the debates. He would make no contract inconsistent with the resolution. Mr. Johnson expressed himself as satisfied with the reply. Committee on compensation. The President announced the following committee, under a resolution adopted yesterday, to inquire and report upon the compensation for the officers of the Convention: Messrs. Johnson of Richmond, Hubbard of Ohio, Gregory of King William, Coffman of Rockingham, and Sheffey of Smythe. Mr. Montague, of Middlesex, in the Chair. Report from the Committee on elections. Mr. Haymond, from the Committee on Elections, submitted a report embodying "a list of the persons who seem to have been elected to the Convention, and the certificates of such election." The Committee add: John D. Sharp is elected from the county of Lee, but his seat in the Convention is contested by M. B. D. Lane, of said county of Lee, and his petition and notice of contest has been
to be published under the resolution adopted yesterday. The President said the resolution authorized the publication of the debates. He would make no contract inconsistent with the resolution. Mr. Johnson expressed himself as satisfied with the reply. Committee on compensation. The President announced the following committee, under a resolution adopted yesterday, to inquire and report upon the compensation for the officers of the Convention: Messrs. Johnson of Richmond, Hubbard of Ohio, Gregory of King William, Coffman of Rockingham, and Sheffey of Smythe. Mr. Montague, of Middlesex, in the Chair. Report from the Committee on elections. Mr. Haymond, from the Committee on Elections, submitted a report embodying "a list of the persons who seem to have been elected to the Convention, and the certificates of such election." The Committee add: John D. Sharp is elected from the county of Lee, but his seat in the Convention is contested by M. B. D. Lane, of
f the past; but said that his constituents, smarting under the wrongs of the Black Republican party, were prepared to resist. Mr. Woods' resolutions were then referred to the Committee on Federal Relations. Washington's birthday. Mr. Carlile said that as the Committee on Federal Relations would not probably be prepared to report before Monday, previous to which there was not much necessity for debate; and to-morrow being the 22d of February, when, he presumed, some of us would likf Monday. Mr. Hall, of Wetzel, was opposed to adjourning over at all. It was rumored that the Peace Conference was about to conclude its labors, and he thought no time should be lost, in view of that fact. If the gentleman from Harrison (Mr. Carlile) wanted to hear Washington's Farewell Address, he would agree to go to his room and read it to him. Mr. Dorman explained why he should vote against adjourning over to Monday. A resolution was laid on the table yesterday in consideration
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