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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: December 14, 1860., [Electronic resource].

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ts nullifying laws be repealed, &c. Mr. Larrabee offered a resolution recommending the several States to call a Convention for making amendments to the Constitution, to the end that the people may thus be enabled to confer together, in the manner provided in the establishment of the government, and adopt such measures as, in their wisdom, may be proper to promote the common welfare of the States. The above propositions were severally read and referred to the Union Committee. Mr. Bonham said he had received a notice to attend a meeting of the Committee on Military Affairs on Friday. As he did not expect to remain much longer a member of Congress, he felt it due to resign his position as a member thereof, in order that the vacancy may at once be filled. He did not adopt this course owing to any dissatisfaction with the Committee; he should always cherish a lively recollection of their uniform and courteous kindness toward him. He was excused. The House passed t
. The debate in Congress Wednesday is interesting. In the Senate, Mr. Wigfall, of Texas, made a warm speech, in which he said: If the people of the Nde one, two or three times yesterday --now is the time to carry it out. Mr. Wigfall said — If the exhibition of feeling in the galleries occur again they should will get them all instructed after a while. [Laughter from Senators.] Mr. Wigfall resumed — I say Cotton is King, and that cotton waves his sceptre not only oe ground and place where that took place. [Laughter in the galleries.] Mr. Wigfall said he had seen it reported in the newspapers. Mr. Seward replied thatng myself to any obligation to explain anything hereafter. [Applause.] Mr. Wigfall continued, and said the denial of the Senator is all I ask. I only saw a repwe allegiance to my State, and to that State allegiance shall be given. Mr. Wigfall having concluded, the Senate went into Executive session, and shortly therea
d a resolution of instructions for constitutionally establishing a line similar unto the Missouri Compromise, providing for the admission of States, and prohibiting the interference of Congress with slavery. Mr. Stevenson offered a resolution that the Committee inquire into the expediency of amending the Fugitive Slave Law by declaring it a felony to resist the Federal officers in its execution, or attempting to rescue the fugitive while in custody of the United States officers. Mr. English offered a resolution that the territory of the United States should be equally divided between the slave and non-slaveholding States; slavery to be recognized in the one and prohibited in the other section; that the right of property in slaves shall not be destroyed or impaired by Congressional agitation; that whenever a slave is rescued the owner shall be allowed the double value of the slave, recoverable in a State Court. Mr. Kilgore offered a resolution of instructions to the Com
not be dispensed with after the election. They would be needed to secure the fruits of the victory. A half million men in uniform are being drilled for the purpose of organization to sweep the country in which I live with fire and sword. Mr. Seward here arose and said — I want to know the ground and place where that took place. [Laughter in the galleries.] Mr. Wigfall said he had seen it reported in the newspapers. Mr. Seward replied that he did not say what was published in thMr. Seward replied that he did not say what was published in the newspapers. I do remember to have read a letter, which I received from some unknown person in the Southern States, professing to impute such a meaning to something I said in some speech of mine.--But I cannot tell what I may have said that could have been perverted so as to imply that I ever said or intimated that the Wide A wakes were being kept organized, or disciplined, or uniformed, or associated at all, to secure the fruits of their victory. I think I can say safely that I never sai
port to this House such details thereof as may be necessary to accommodate the same to the existing Constitution of the United States. Also, resolved, That said Committee also be requested to take into consideration the means necessary, if any can be devised, to restore the equilibrium between the free and the slave States in the Senate; and particularity whether this end can be accomplished by a voluntary division on the part of some of the slave States into two or more States. Mr. Hindman proposed amendments to the Constitution expressly recognizing property in slaves where slavery now or may hereafter exist, and the express denial to the Federal Government to prohibit or interfere with it anywhere, or restrict trade in slaves between the States; also an express agreement to protect slavery wherever the Federal jurisdiction extends, and the protection of slaves while passing through free States; shy State defeating or impairing the Fugitive Slave law not to be entitled to
McClelland (search for this): article 1
ucting the Committee to inquire whether any action is necessary (in view of the present condition of public affairs) against an attempt by any State to nullity the laws necessary for the existence of the Confederacy. Mr. Davis, of Indiana, presented a petition asking Congress to preclude Congress from legislation on slavery, &c. Mr. Niblack offered a resolution providing indemnity for slaves rescued by force or violence; and that the Committee report, by bill or otherwise. Mr. McClelland offered the following: Resolved. That the Committee of Thirty-three be instructed to inquire and report whether Congress has the constitutional power to make the people of any particular State or municipal corporation therein, liable to indemnity the owner of any slave escaping into such State, and who has been rescued from rightful custody by force or otherwise; and also, whether it is expedient to establish a special Federal police for the purpose of executing the laws of the Uni
Stevenson (search for this): article 1
ch additional legislation as they may deem necessary to suppress and put down armed rebellion against the laws and authority of the United States, to protect the property thereof against unlawful seizure, and the citizens thereof against unlawful violence. Mr. Mallory offered a resolution of instructions for constitutionally establishing a line similar unto the Missouri Compromise, providing for the admission of States, and prohibiting the interference of Congress with slavery. Mr. Stevenson offered a resolution that the Committee inquire into the expediency of amending the Fugitive Slave Law by declaring it a felony to resist the Federal officers in its execution, or attempting to rescue the fugitive while in custody of the United States officers. Mr. English offered a resolution that the territory of the United States should be equally divided between the slave and non-slaveholding States; slavery to be recognized in the one and prohibited in the other section; that
tion. That the Constitution is the result of conciliation and compromise, and can only be preserved by the exercise of a similar spirit. Mr. Morris, of Pennsylvania, offered a resolution instructing, the Union Committee to inquire and report as to whether the State Personal Liberty bills are in conflict with the Constitution, and further, to inquire whether the Fugitive Slave Law is susceptible of amendment so as to ascertain more certainly the actual condition of the fugitive. Mr. Stewart, of Maryland, offered a preamble setting forth the principles on which the government is founded. That when it threatens to become destructive to the great objects which it was intended to accomplish, every State should be placed in a condition to provide for its own security; that there is good reason to believe that certain States are about to withdraw from the Union, &c, and concluding with a resolution instructing the Select Committee to inquire, among other things, whether any measu
r. Adrian submitted a series of resolutions declaratory of the doctrine of non-intervention as the true remedy. That all State laws in conflict with the Constitution and laws of Congress ought to be repealed. That the Fugitive Slave Law and all other laws of the land ought to be respected and obeyed, and no obstacle thrown in the way of their execution. That the Constitution is the result of conciliation and compromise, and can only be preserved by the exercise of a similar spirit. Mr. Morris, of Pennsylvania, offered a resolution instructing, the Union Committee to inquire and report as to whether the State Personal Liberty bills are in conflict with the Constitution, and further, to inquire whether the Fugitive Slave Law is susceptible of amendment so as to ascertain more certainly the actual condition of the fugitive. Mr. Stewart, of Maryland, offered a preamble setting forth the principles on which the government is founded. That when it threatens to become destructiv
he Union and establish a government for ourselves. If you then persist in aggression, these sovereign States will settle the question, and when you laugh at these impotent efforts, little as you regard them, I tell you emphatically that Cotton is King. [Laughter, and some applause in the galleries.] The President said the Sergeant-at-Arms will clear the galleries if it occurs again. Mr. Hale said--Mr. President, that threat was made one, two or three times yesterday --now is the timeies. I take it for granted that those warned yesterday did not repeat it. Yesterday there was one set, to-day there is a new set. We will get them all instructed after a while. [Laughter from Senators.] Mr. Wigfall resumed — I say Cotton is King, and that cotton waves his sceptre not only over thirty-three States, but over the Island of Great Britain and over Continental Europe. There is no crowned head, either upon that Island or Continent, that does not bend the knee in fear, and a
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