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resident" for the residue of the term. Mr. Senmes, of La., admitted that a President could only be elected for the prescribed term of six years, but argued that the Constitution, constructively, granted to the people the right of selecting a President, in case the office should become vacant. He asked for a record of the vote on the question of constitutional construction involved. The motion to strike out was then agreed to by the following vote: Yeas.--Messrs, Baker, Brown, Burnett, Clay, Cinir, Hunter, Johnson, Maxwell, Mitchell, Oldham, Phelan, Peyton, Preston Simms, and Yancey--15. Nays.--Messrs. Barnwell, Haynes, Henry, Orr, Sparrow, and Semmes--6. Conscription. A message from His Excellency, the President, recommending the conscription of persons subject to military duty between the ages of 18 and 35, was laid before the Senate. Mr. Sparrow, of La., moved that it be referred to the Committee on Military Affairs. A long debate ensued, in wh
idue of the term. Mr. Senmes, of La., admitted that a President could only be elected for the prescribed term of six years, but argued that the Constitution, constructively, granted to the people the right of selecting a President, in case the office should become vacant. He asked for a record of the vote on the question of constitutional construction involved. The motion to strike out was then agreed to by the following vote: Yeas.--Messrs, Baker, Brown, Burnett, Clay, Cinir, Hunter, Johnson, Maxwell, Mitchell, Oldham, Phelan, Peyton, Preston Simms, and Yancey--15. Nays.--Messrs. Barnwell, Haynes, Henry, Orr, Sparrow, and Semmes--6. Conscription. A message from His Excellency, the President, recommending the conscription of persons subject to military duty between the ages of 18 and 35, was laid before the Senate. Mr. Sparrow, of La., moved that it be referred to the Committee on Military Affairs. A long debate ensued, in which Dr. Oldham opposed
but argued that the Constitution, constructively, granted to the people the right of selecting a President, in case the office should become vacant. He asked for a record of the vote on the question of constitutional construction involved. The motion to strike out was then agreed to by the following vote: Yeas.--Messrs, Baker, Brown, Burnett, Clay, Cinir, Hunter, Johnson, Maxwell, Mitchell, Oldham, Phelan, Peyton, Preston Simms, and Yancey--15. Nays.--Messrs. Barnwell, Haynes, Henry, Orr, Sparrow, and Semmes--6. Conscription. A message from His Excellency, the President, recommending the conscription of persons subject to military duty between the ages of 18 and 35, was laid before the Senate. Mr. Sparrow, of La., moved that it be referred to the Committee on Military Affairs. A long debate ensued, in which Dr. Oldham opposed the recommendation, and Messrs Sparrow, Clark of Mo. and Wigfall favored it. The motion to refer the message to the Commit
M. D. Hoes (search for this): article 21
Confederate Congress.first session. Senate. Saturday, March 29, 1862. The Senate met at 12 o'clock Mr. Prayer by Rev. Dr. M. D. Hoes, of the Presbyterian Church. Mr. Baker, of Florida, introduced a bill to create the Eastern Judicial District of Florida, and to provide for the Judges and officers thereof. The bill was referred to the Committee of the Judiciary. Payment of prize money. Mr. Semmes, of La., submitted the following joint resolution, which was adopted: Resolved, by the Congress of the Confederate States That any share of prize money awarded, of which may be awarded, to any seaman of marine who may be a prisoner in the hands of the enemy, shall, under the direction of the Secretary of the Navy, be paid to the wife of such seaman or marine during his captivity. Pension to widows. Mr. Sparrow, of La., from the Committee on Military Affairs, to whom was referred a bill relative to the payment of pensions to widows of deceased soldiers
case of vacancies in the office of both President and Vice President, was taken up, and the amendments proposed by the Committee on the Judiciary agreed to. Mr. Clay, of Ala., then moved to strike out all after the first section of the bill, being that portion providing for an election, by the people, of President and Vice-President, in case of vacancies in both offices. This motion gave rise to a debate of the question of constitutionality presented, Mr. Clay and Mr. Preston of Va., affirming that a proper construction of the Confederate Constitution disallowed a popular election of President except for the regular term of six years, and only auquestion of constitutional construction involved. The motion to strike out was then agreed to by the following vote: Yeas.--Messrs, Baker, Brown, Burnett, Clay, Cinir, Hunter, Johnson, Maxwell, Mitchell, Oldham, Phelan, Peyton, Preston Simms, and Yancey--15. Nays.--Messrs. Barnwell, Haynes, Henry, Orr, Sparrow, and S
Preston Simms (search for this): article 21
dent could only be elected for the prescribed term of six years, but argued that the Constitution, constructively, granted to the people the right of selecting a President, in case the office should become vacant. He asked for a record of the vote on the question of constitutional construction involved. The motion to strike out was then agreed to by the following vote: Yeas.--Messrs, Baker, Brown, Burnett, Clay, Cinir, Hunter, Johnson, Maxwell, Mitchell, Oldham, Phelan, Peyton, Preston Simms, and Yancey--15. Nays.--Messrs. Barnwell, Haynes, Henry, Orr, Sparrow, and Semmes--6. Conscription. A message from His Excellency, the President, recommending the conscription of persons subject to military duty between the ages of 18 and 35, was laid before the Senate. Mr. Sparrow, of La., moved that it be referred to the Committee on Military Affairs. A long debate ensued, in which Dr. Oldham opposed the recommendation, and Messrs Sparrow, Clark of Mo. and Wigfa
that a President could only be elected for the prescribed term of six years, but argued that the Constitution, constructively, granted to the people the right of selecting a President, in case the office should become vacant. He asked for a record of the vote on the question of constitutional construction involved. The motion to strike out was then agreed to by the following vote: Yeas.--Messrs, Baker, Brown, Burnett, Clay, Cinir, Hunter, Johnson, Maxwell, Mitchell, Oldham, Phelan, Peyton, Preston Simms, and Yancey--15. Nays.--Messrs. Barnwell, Haynes, Henry, Orr, Sparrow, and Semmes--6. Conscription. A message from His Excellency, the President, recommending the conscription of persons subject to military duty between the ages of 18 and 35, was laid before the Senate. Mr. Sparrow, of La., moved that it be referred to the Committee on Military Affairs. A long debate ensued, in which Dr. Oldham opposed the recommendation, and Messrs Sparrow, Clark of Mo
Mr. Senmes, of La., admitted that a President could only be elected for the prescribed term of six years, but argued that the Constitution, constructively, granted to the people the right of selecting a President, in case the office should become vacant. He asked for a record of the vote on the question of constitutional construction involved. The motion to strike out was then agreed to by the following vote: Yeas.--Messrs, Baker, Brown, Burnett, Clay, Cinir, Hunter, Johnson, Maxwell, Mitchell, Oldham, Phelan, Peyton, Preston Simms, and Yancey--15. Nays.--Messrs. Barnwell, Haynes, Henry, Orr, Sparrow, and Semmes--6. Conscription. A message from His Excellency, the President, recommending the conscription of persons subject to military duty between the ages of 18 and 35, was laid before the Senate. Mr. Sparrow, of La., moved that it be referred to the Committee on Military Affairs. A long debate ensued, in which Dr. Oldham opposed the recommendati
he Committee on Military Affairs, to whom was referred a bill relative to the payment of pensions to widows of deceased soldiers, &c, returned the same, and asked to be discharged from the further consideration thereof. Organization of the Navy. The Senate proceeded to the consideration of a bill to amend an act to provide for the organization of the navy. On motion of Mr. Hill, of Ga., a clause was inserted providing for the appointment of not more than twelve chaplains. Mr. Oar Indicated a purpose to submit an amendment which he had not an opportunity to prepare. At his instance the bill was again laid upon the table for the present. The Presidential Office. The bill declaring the officer who shall act as President in case of vacancies in the office of both President and Vice President, was taken up, and the amendments proposed by the Committee on the Judiciary agreed to. Mr. Clay, of Ala., then moved to strike out all after the first section of the
Confederate Congress.first session. Senate. Saturday, March 29, 1862. The Senate met at 12 o'clock Mr. Prayer by Rev. Dr. M. D. Hoes, of the Presbyterian Church. Mr. Baker, of Florida, introduced a bill to create the Eastern Judicial District of Florida, and to provide for the Judges and officers thereof. The bill was referred to the Committee of the Judiciary. Payment of prize money. Mr. Semmes, of La., submitted the following joint resolution, which was adopted: Resolved, by the Congress of the Confederate States That any share of prize money awarded, of which may be awarded, to any seaman of marine who may be a prisoner in the hands of the enemy, shall, under the direction of the Secretary of the Navy, be paid to the wife of such seaman or marine during his captivity. Pension to widows. Mr. Sparrow, of La., from the Committee on Military Affairs, to whom was referred a bill relative to the payment of pensions to widows of deceased soldiers,
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