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nger than he should, [laughter,] but that very hesitancy gave the measure finally its fullest force. He did not believe there was one man in the Cabinet who did not think that, if we put down the rebellion, we must put down slavery. There never was a moment since the war began when there was not a tendency to give the contest this aspect. He had the utmost confidence in our success. The rebels had exhausted the goods they bought of the New York merchants in 1860 and cheated them out of in 1861. [Laughter.] He did not believe the rebels were getting many supplies from Europe, for they were bad paymasters at best, and this was not their best time [Laughter and applause.] He believed that by next spring we should be a united, free and happy people. [Applause.] He believed that the South would try and patch up a peace before January. The English, who saw nothing but defeat for us, forgot that we were reinforcing the Army of the Potomac with 600,000 men. Our army was stronger th
September 27th, 1862 AD (search for this): article 1
en and Cumberland, were yesterday attacked by a rebel force and all taken prisoners. The dispatch adds: At the same time a cavalry force, under Colonel McReynolds. Captured the encampment of the rebels bringing away two pieces of artillery, ten wagons and sixty horses and mules. A strong cavalry force, under General Averill, has been sent after the retreating rebels. Gen. McClellan has sent the following letter to Gov. of Pa.: Hdq'rs Army of the Potomac,Sharpsburg, Sept. 27, 1862. Governor. --I beg to avail myself of a most the first I have had since the recent battles to tender to you my thanks for your wise and energetic action in calling out the militia of Pennsylvania for its defence, when threatened by a numerous and victorious army of the enemy. Fortunately circumstances rendered it impossible for the enemy to set foot upon the soil of Pennsylvania, but the moral support rendered to my army by your action was the less mighty. In the came of my arm
September 30th, 1862 AD (search for this): article 1
r the balance, and then call for 400,000 more to be held in reserve. "A peace must be conquered. Prosecute this war with all energy and an activity which assume that it can only terminate by the utter annihilation of the rebel army, and the destruction of all its resource. " Compliment to McClellan. Gen. Halleck seems to be afraid that "Little Mac" don't exactly understand that he has on a victory, and writes him the following assurance of the fact: Washington, D. C., Sept. 30, 1862. Maj. Gen. McClellan, Commanding, &c.: General: Your report of yesterday, giving the results of the battles of South Mountain and Antitain, has been received and submitted to the President. They were not only hard fought battles, but well-earned and decided victories. The valor and endurance of your army in the several conflicts which terminated in the expulsion of the enemy from the loyal State of Maryland, are creditable alike to the troops and to the officers who commanded
h from McClellan's headquarters, dated the says that a company of the 54th Pennsylvania, who were guarding the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad at Pan-Pan, about half way between and Cumberland, were yesterday attacked by a rebel force and all taken prisoners. The dispatch adds: At the same time a cavalry force, under Colonel McReynolds. Captured the encampment of the rebels bringing away two pieces of artillery, ten wagons and sixty horses and mules. A strong cavalry force, under General Averill, has been sent after the retreating rebels. Gen. McClellan has sent the following letter to Gov. of Pa.: Hdq'rs Army of the Potomac,Sharpsburg, Sept. 27, 1862. Governor. --I beg to avail myself of a most the first I have had since the recent battles to tender to you my thanks for your wise and energetic action in calling out the militia of Pennsylvania for its defence, when threatened by a numerous and victorious army of the enemy. Fortunately circumstances rendered
Detective Baker (search for this): article 1
of male population there is taking place into Virginia. The lower counties of the State will not be able to furnish more than a fourth part of their quota under the draft. It every male individual of Charles and St. Mary's counties were to be impressed, still the quotas of these two counties would remain unfilled. Most of the young men of this region are now serving in the rebel army. Geo. D. Spencer, an officer of the Criminal Court of this district, was to- day by order of Chief Detective Baker, on the charge of disloyalty. In conversation he endorsed the action of the rebel Government in raising the black flag, and said it should have been done long ago. He will be sent to the Old Capitol prison. Exchange of prisoners — Affairs at Suffolk A letter dated Norfolk, the 3d inst., says Lieut. Col. has been entrusted with the arrangement of the exchange and that "the next of the Commissioners will prove very important." my is known to have massed considerab
time, brought so many delays and reverses on our guns. It will be readily perceived that to permit the Governors of States to assign troops to special officers, would be virtually conceding to them the right to make or unmake General son command. A band of thirty or forty marauders, stragglers and deserters from, and camp followers of, our army, are roaming over portions of London and Fairfax counties, insulting, maltreating, and plundering citizens with impurity. We trust that Gen. Banks will promptly send after them a body of cavalry with instructions to shoot or hang them on the spot where caught. Just prior to the visit paid to Warrenton by our forces, the Confederate authorities in anticipation of the away every negro in the neighborhood, slave or free, to a portion of The Northern Episcopal Convention. The opening discourse of this body, which is still in session at New York, was delivered by Bishop McCloskey, of Michigan. He began by observing t
ral Nelson in feeling and befitting terms. History will honor Gen. Nelson as one of the first to organize, by his own individual exertions, a military force in Kentucky, his native State, to rescue here from the vortex of rebellion, toward which she was crafting. On more than one battle field he was his gallant reported that General Buell retains his command on the recommendation of General Thomas and nearly all the other division officers of the Army of the Ohio. Generals D. and Boyle are to command divisions. General Rousseau's splendid division, comprising thereon regiments of about 6,200 men, and four batteries, paraded our streets yesterday. Latest papers from Nashville date the 23d.--Nashville was then in our possession. Fully 200,000 letters for Buell's army are said to have accumulated at Louisville, and 30,000 letters to have been sent yesterday from this post office. The rebel army in Kentucky is now computed at about 80,000. However, Col. W. H. Polk
is a very important one just at this Following up the triumphs at South and the success movements of Buell and Morgan in Kentucky it will have a greatly of Bragg's and South's army in Kentucky forces in Arkansas, and Lee's troops the Virginia. Thus the is Now with a million of fresh men in the what is there for therevalent here that General was attached by Kirby Smith a rebel force, at to-day, and driven This last is entirely dis Danville for Lexington on Tuesday. Bragg was expected at Danville on He threatened to send every man who the rebel army to the north of the The rebels are cutting new roads from Bardstown to Springt yesterday from this post office. The rebel army in Kentucky is now computed at about 80,000. However, Col. W. H. Polk, of Tennessee, is said to assert that Bragg has only 25,000, with which he frightened Buell and the Generals in command at Louisville. The invader's scout for pickets are within twelve miles of the city. O
ry important one just at this Following up the triumphs at South and the success movements of Buell and Morgan in Kentucky it will have a greatly of Bragg's and South's army in Kentucky forcesith massive silver ornaments and enveloped in "his country's flag" The letter says: Major General Buell yesterday announced the death of Major General Nelson in feeling and befitting terms. Hich she was crafting. On more than one battle field he was his gallant reported that General Buell retains his command on the recommendation of General Thomas and nearly all the other divisios from Nashville date the 23d.--Nashville was then in our possession. Fully 200,000 letters for Buell's army are said to have accumulated at Louisville, and 30,000 letters to have been sent yesterdaW. H. Polk, of Tennessee, is said to assert that Bragg has only 25,000, with which he frightened Buell and the Generals in command at Louisville. The invader's scout for pickets are within twelve mi
uyandotte, and have endeavored to capture some steamboats loaded with Government stores, but as have not been able either in capture any boats or prevent the navigation of a small boats running between here and Portsmouth. Squads of cavalry are moving over all this part of the State engaged in stealing horses, forage, &c., and forcing men into their ranks under the Conscription law of the Southern Confederacy. From Louisville. A letter from Louisville, dated the 1st, says that Bull Nelson was buried there the day before, with great pump, his coffin being mounted with massive silver ornaments and enveloped in "his country's flag" The letter says: Major General Buell yesterday announced the death of Major General Nelson in feeling and befitting terms. History will honor Gen. Nelson as one of the first to organize, by his own individual exertions, a military force in Kentucky, his native State, to rescue here from the vortex of rebellion, toward which she was crafti
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