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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 10, 1862., [Electronic resource].

Found 565 total hits in 251 results.

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January 13th (search for this): article 6
ton, it would afford me the sincerest pleasure to depute one of my officers to accompany any messenger you may deem proper to be the bearer of your demand." This proposition was promptly accepted by the Governor, and, in pursuance thereof, he sent on his part, Hon. J. W. Hayne, the Attorney General of South Carolina, to Washington, whilst Major Anderson deputed Lieut. Hall, of the United States army, to accompany him. These gentlemen arrived together in Washington on the evening of 13th of January, when the President obtained the first knowledge of the transaction. But it will be recollected that no time intervened between the return of the Star of the West to New York and the arrival of the messenger hearing a copy of the truce at Washington within which it would have been possible to send reinforcements to Fort Sumter. Both events occurred about the same time. Thus a truce, or suspension of arms, was concluded between the parties, to continues until the question of the s
January 22nd (search for this): article 6
, resigned his office about the end of December, and immediately thereafter I nominated to the Senate, as his successor, a suitable person, prepared at any personal risk to do his duty. That body, however, throughout its entire session, declined to act on this nomination. Thus, without a collector, it was rendered impossible to collect the revenue. IV. General Scott's statements allege that "the Brooklyn, with Capt. Vodges's company alone, left the Chesapeake for Fort Pickens about January 22d, and on the 29th President Buchanan, having entered into a quasi armistice with certain leading Seceders at Pensacola and elsewhere, caused Secretaries Holt and Toucey to instruct, in a joint note, the commander of the war vessel off Pensacola, and Lieut, Siemmer, commanding Fort Pickens, to commit no act of hostility, and not to land Capt. Vodges's company unless the fort should be attacked" He afterwards states, within brackets, "That joint note I never saw, but suppose the armistice wa
January 24th (search for this): article 6
d to a third person. He instantly informed the President of the fact, and reinforcements, provisions, and military stores were dispatched by the Brooklyn to Fort Pickens without a moment's un- necessary delay. She left Fortress Monroe on the 24th of January. Well-founded apprehensions were, however, entertained at the time of her departure that the reinforcements, with the vessels of war at no great distance from Fort Pickens, could not arrive in time to defend it against the impending uffice it to say, it was carefully guarded at every point for the security of the fort and its free communication with Washington. The result was highly fortunate. The Brooklyn had a long passage. Although she left Fortress Monroe on the 24th of January, she did not arrive at Pensacola until the 5th of February. In the meantime Fort Pickens, with Lieutenant Slemmer (whose conduct deserves high commendation,) and his brave little band were placed, by virtue of this arrangement, in perfect
January 28th (search for this): article 6
Fortress Monroe on the 24th of January. Well-founded apprehensions were, however, entertained at the time of her departure that the reinforcements, with the vessels of war at no great distance from Fort Pickens, could not arrive in time to defend it against the impending attack.--In this state of suspense, and whilst Lieutenant Slemmer was in extreme peril, Senators Sildell, Hunter, and Bigler received a telegraphic dispatch from Senator Mallory, of Florida, dated at Pensacola, on the 28th January, with the urgent request that they should lay it before the President. This dispatch expressed an earnest desire to maintain the peace, as well as the most positive assurance that no attack would be made on Fort Pickens if the present status should be preserved. This proposal was carefully considered, both with a view to the safety of the fort and to the unhappy effect which an actual collision either at that or any other point might produce on the Peace Convention, then about t
January 29th (search for this): article 6
minate with it." The statements betray a singular want of memory on the part of General Scott. It is scarcely credible that this very joint note, presented in such various colors, was submitted to Gen. Scott on the day it was prepared, (29th January,) and met his entire approbation. I would not venture to make this assertion if I did not possess conclusive evidence do prove it. On that day Secretary Holt addressed me a note, from which the following is an extract: "I have the satisfactioce Convention, then about to assemble at Washington. The result was that a joint dispatch was carefully prepared by the Secretaries of War and Navy, accepting the proposal, with important modifications, which was transmitted by telegraph on the 29th of January to Lieut. Slemmer and to the naval commanders near the station. It is too long for transcription; suffice it to say, it was carefully guarded at every point for the security of the fort and its free communication with Washington. Th
January 31st (search for this): article 6
ld have been to cast a reflection on Major Anderson, who, beyond question, acted from the highest and purest motives. Did Gen. Scott ever propose to violate this truce during its existence? If he did, I am not now, and never was, aware of the fact. Indeed, I think he would have been one of the last men in the world to propose such a measure. Colonel Hayne did not deliver the letter which he bore from Governor Pickens, demanding the surrender of the fort, to the President until the 31st of January. The document containing the reasons for this worrying delay were communicated to Congress in a special message of the 8th of February, to which I refer the reader. On the 5th of February, the Secretary of War, under the instructions of the President, gave a peremptory refusal to this demand in an able and comprehensive letter, reviewing the whole subject, explaining and justifying the conduct of the President throughout. Its concluding sentence is both eloquent and emphatic. "I
buildings, &c., $1,577.84; repairs on real estate in Richmond, $35.26; sundries charged for transportation expenses, $6,481.82. Total, $371,809.96. The road earned in October, 1861, $104,277.63; in August, 1862, $146,160.79; in September, 1862, $118,418.93. These are the largest earnings for any months embraced in the fiscal year. As to the road way itself, it has suffered more from long-continued rains and from raids of the enemy than from the amount of tonnage transported. The track between the Junction and Gordonsville requires ballasting. The sidings at Beaver Dam, Louisa C. H., and Gordonsville, have been extended. The amount of capital stock authorized by the charter of the road is three millions four hundred thousand dollars. The bridges over Rivana river and Moore's creek need replacing by others of a heavier character. In the raid of the enemy on Jackson's River depot, 19th of May, they were piloted by W. P. Rucker, formerly a citizen of Allegheny county.
August 15th (search for this): article 4
of War, Richmond, Va. Sir: --I observe in the late message of the Governor of the State certain charges that, exceeding my authority as a Confederate officer, I had improperly and mischievously interfered with the non-conscripts in Southwest Virginia, and demoralized the militia. Deprecating a controversy with the Governor, and disclaiming accountability to him for my official acts, I deem it proper to lay my action on the subject before you. In accordance with your telegram of August 15th, stating "persons in the employment of the Government are not regarded as ble to militia duty," and directing me "to retain them and remit the question of liability to be determined in a conference between the Secretary of War and the Governor," I issued the following General Order of August 17th: "In accordance with instructions from the Secretary of War, persons in the employment of the Government are regarded as not liable to militia duty, and will be retained in their present oc
August 17th (search for this): article 4
ing a controversy with the Governor, and disclaiming accountability to him for my official acts, I deem it proper to lay my action on the subject before you. In accordance with your telegram of August 15th, stating "persons in the employment of the Government are not regarded as ble to militia duty," and directing me "to retain them and remit the question of liability to be determined in a conference between the Secretary of War and the Governor," I issued the following General Order of August 17th: "In accordance with instructions from the Secretary of War, persons in the employment of the Government are regarded as not liable to militia duty, and will be retained in their present occupations and employments until it is otherwise ordered and determined;" --and in accordance with your telegram of August 18, stating "the militia may volunteer before enrolling, if they volunteer for three years, or the war, they are entitled to bounty." And your letter of August 21st, stating "un
August 18th (search for this): article 4
"to retain them and remit the question of liability to be determined in a conference between the Secretary of War and the Governor," I issued the following General Order of August 17th: "In accordance with instructions from the Secretary of War, persons in the employment of the Government are regarded as not liable to militia duty, and will be retained in their present occupations and employments until it is otherwise ordered and determined;" --and in accordance with your telegram of August 18, stating "the militia may volunteer before enrolling, if they volunteer for three years, or the war, they are entitled to bounty." And your letter of August 21st, stating "until mustered into the State service the militia can volunteer, and will receive bounty. If they enlist for three years or the war." I issued another General Order, which follows: "The General commanding announces, upon the authority of the Secretary of War to the militia in this department between 35 and 45 years of
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