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it remained until the final day of dissolution at Appomattox Court-House. At the time when a raid was made by Captain Tompkins, of the Federal army, on Fairfax Court-House, where the lamented Captain John Quincey Marr was killed, the Black Horse, at the request of their captain, were ordered to that point, from which they performed much arduous scouting duty, and became well known to the enemy. Upon the advance of General McDowell, the Black Horse rejoined the army at Manassas. On the 4th of July, in an attempt to ambuscade a detachment of the enemy, two members were killed and several wounded by the mistaken fire of a South Carolina regiment of infantry. In the memorable battle of the 21st of July, in which so absolute a victory was won by the Confederate arms, the Black Horse Cavalry distinguished itself in the pursuit of the flying enemy, and the next day were thanked by President Davis in a speech. Soon after the battle of Manassas, the Black Horse Cavalry was selected by Ge
Quincey Marr was killed, the Black Horse, at the request of their captain, were ordered to that point, from which they performed much arduous scouting duty, and became well known to the enemy. Upon the advance of General McDowell, the Black Horse rejoined the army at Manassas. On the 4th of July, in an attempt to ambuscade a detachment of the enemy, two members were killed and several wounded by the mistaken fire of a South Carolina regiment of infantry. In the memorable battle of the 21st of July, in which so absolute a victory was won by the Confederate arms, the Black Horse Cavalry distinguished itself in the pursuit of the flying enemy, and the next day were thanked by President Davis in a speech. Soon after the battle of Manassas, the Black Horse Cavalry was selected by General Joseph E. Johnston, commanding the army, to be his body-guard. In this capacity it received Prince Napoleon and his suite, consisting of Count Sartiges and others, upon their visit to the Confederate
October 11th (search for this): chapter 43
rt was foiled by this fight, and he moved on to Carlisle barracks, which, with his artillery, he set on fire. From Carlisle the Southern cavalry marched to Gettysburg, and took position on Lee's left, near Huntersville. They took part in the battle on the memorable 3d of July, 1863, in which the Southern Confederacy received its death wound. Upon Meade's advance into Virginia, Lee retired to the south bank of the Rapidan, with headquarters at Orange Court-House, where he remained until October 11th. He then determined to assume the offensive. With this intent he ordered General Fitz Lee, with whom the Black Horse was serving, to cross the Rapidan at Raccoon and Morton's fords, where he found himself face to face with Buford's cavalry division. In the fight which ensued, the Black Horse lost some of its bravest men, and the Fourth Virginia two of its most gallant officers. This spirited attack, combined with an attack by General Lomax's Brigade, compelled Buford's retreat to t
auquier. After the war closed, General Meiggs, believing that his son had been assassinated, sought to have Martin arrested and tried by a court-martial for murder; but when the facts, as above stated, were certified to him by Captain A. D. Payne, the matter was dropped, for Lieutenant Meiggs had been slain in open and legitimate war. George W. Martin is now at home, a prosperous agriculturist, and one of the most respected citizens in the community in which he resides. In the month of December, the Black Horse was ordered into tardy county, and performed hazardous but thankless service among the Swamp Dragoons, as the disloyal element in that county named itself. They suffered severely from cold, but consumed large quantities of pork and apple brandy, in which, at that season, that inhospitable region abounds. Returning from this duty, the command proceeded to Richmond, where it remained until the beginning of the final act in this stupendous tragedy. They fought side by si
June 18th, 1859 AD (search for this): chapter 43
The Black Horse cavalry. Colonel John Scott. The Black Horse Cavalry was organized, or rather first set in line, by Captain D. H. Jones, United States Army, afterward a Confederate general, at Waterloo, on the Rappahannock river, in Farquier county, Virginia, on the 18th of June, 1859, the anniversary of the battle of Waterloo. On that day, so auspicious for liberties of mankind, did this command come into existence which was destined to act so distinguished and important a part in the prolonged effort to establish the independence of a Southern Republic. Already had the storm-cloud began to gather, the hurricane to lower in the distance, and the organization of the Black Horse Cavalry was the first step which was taken in Fauquier county to meet the prognosticated war. The first captain elected was John Scott, a planter, residing in the neighborhood of Warrenton, and the author of The lost principle. Robert Randolph, a young lawyer of the Warrenton bar, was chosen first lieu
the Virginia bar, who, during the war, rose to be a brigadier general in Stuart's cavalry division. Another, a young lawyer of brilliant promise, was Thomas Gordon Pollock, the son of the author of The Exode, a sublime production, and on his mother's side was sprung from the heroic blood of the Lees. During the war he was transferred, with the rank of captain, to the staff of Brigadier General James L. Kemper, and fell in storming Cemetery Heights. When it was discovered, in the spring of 1860, that the law allowed a third lieutenant to the command, an election was held in the town of Warrenton to fill the vacant post. There were several candidates, but the captain requested the men to elect A. D. Payne, which was done; for at that early period he discerned in him those high military qualities which, in the field, he afterward displayed. He has survived the war, and is now a distinguished member of the Warrenton bar. The first service which the command was ordered to perform
enemy, and the next day were thanked by President Davis in a speech. Soon after the battle of Manassas, the Black Horse Cavalry was selected by General Joseph E. Johnston, commanding the army, to be his body-guard. In this capacity it received Prince Napoleon and his suite, consisting of Count Sartiges and others, upon their visit to the Confederate army, escorted them to the general's headquarters, and was, the next day, the escort at a review of the army at Centreville. In the fall of 1861 the command was incorporated in the Fourth Virginia Cavalry, when Captain William H. Payne was promoted to be major of the regiment, and Lieutenant Robert Randolph succeeded to the captaincy, but was soon after detached to form the body-guard of General Earl Van Dorn, commanding a division at Manassas. When General Earl Van Dorn was assigned to an independent command in the further South, he made an unsuccessful application to be allowed to carry the Black Horse with him. In the spring of 18
April 16th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 43
f the Black Horse immediately tendered his command to Governor Pickens. This act proved to be in advance of the popular feeling, and many murmurs were excited; but it was ratified by the command at its next meeting. About the time of the formation of the Southern Republic, at Montgomery, fearing that Virginia would not take part in the movement, the captain of the Black Horse relinquished his command, and was commissioned captain in the army of the Confederate States. On the 16th of April, 1861, the day before the Ordinance of Secession was passed by Virginia, orders were received by Lieutenant Randolph, commanding the Black Horse Cavalry, and by Captain Ashby, to assemble their respective commands and proceed, without delay, to Harper's Ferry. The object of this expedition was to capture the stores and munitions of war collected at that place, so necessary to the Confederates in the struggle in which they were about to engage. Success depended upon secresy and dispatch, an
61 the command was incorporated in the Fourth Virginia Cavalry, when Captain William H. Payne was promoted to be major of the regiment, and Lieutenant Robert Randolph succeeded to the captaincy, but was soon after detached to form the body-guard of General Earl Van Dorn, commanding a division at Manassas. When General Earl Van Dorn was assigned to an independent command in the further South, he made an unsuccessful application to be allowed to carry the Black Horse with him. In the spring of 1862 the command accompanied General Johnston to Yorktown, and on the march was employed as scouts in the rear, and as guides to the brigade and division commanders, on account of their familiarity with the roads, water-courses, and points suitable for camping. When the army reached Culpepper county it was reported that the enemy, under General Sumner, had advanced as far as Warrenton Junction. General Stuart ordered a detail of ten of the Black Horse to change overcoats with the Governor's Guar
Lee again put his army in motion, and posted it on the Spottsylvania Heights, at Fredericksburg, and confronted Burnside on the opposite side of the river. The Union army again suffered defeat, and again changed its general. In the winter of 1863, while General Hooker was on the north bank of the Rappahannock, the Black Horse was detached from the Fourth Virginia Cavalry, and ordered to Lower Fauquier and Stafford county to report the enemy's movements to General Lee. During this time thed of the adventures of the scouts, the General expressed great satisfaction, but remarked it was the first time in his experience he had ever known whisky or brandy entitled to be put on the credit side of the sheet. In the ensuing campaign of 1863, the Black Horse constituted a part of Stuart's cavalry division, and participated in the battle of Chancellorsville, the severe fight at Brandy Station, and in all the movements conducted by Stuart to mask the movements of Lee's army in the Vall
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