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March 27th (search for this): chapter 13
ed along. March 26. Wrote letters home; visited the Invalides, and saw the new tomb of Napoleon; then visited Mr. William B. Greene and his most intelligent wife, living off beyond the Luxembourg; saw something of that quarter; then dined with Elliot C. Cowdin, a merchant here, once connected with the mercantile Library Association [of Boston],—the first time I have met company at dinner for ten months; then to the Italian opera, where I heard the last part of II Barbiere di Siviglia. March 27. Enjoyed a drive with Mr. and Mrs. R. C. Waterston, who took me to various places, among others Notre Dame and St. Étienne du Mont, and afterwards for hours in the Bois de Boulogne, which was new to me, and as beautiful as new. Dined with Appleton, and then with him and Miss Hensler Afterwards Countess of Edla, and wife of Ferdinand, titular king of Portugal. (our Boston singer), to the Opera Lyrique, where I heard Oberon. March 28. Plunged into the abyss of the Louvre galleries; dine
March 28th (search for this): chapter 13
I heard the last part of II Barbiere di Siviglia. March 27. Enjoyed a drive with Mr. and Mrs. R. C. Waterston, who took me to various places, among others Notre Dame and St. Étienne du Mont, and afterwards for hours in the Bois de Boulogne, which was new to me, and as beautiful as new. Dined with Appleton, and then with him and Miss Hensler Afterwards Countess of Edla, and wife of Ferdinand, titular king of Portugal. (our Boston singer), to the Opera Lyrique, where I heard Oberon. March 28. Plunged into the abyss of the Louvre galleries; dined with Mr. Edward Brooks, and then tired myself at the Concert Musard. March 29. Beautiful day; called again at Crawford's; his wife told me that he had expressed a desire to see me. The diseased eye was covered with a shade; but the other eye and his face looked well. The fatal disease seems, however, daily to assert its power, and has already touched the brain. I held his hand, and expressed my fervent good wishes, and then after a
March 29th (search for this): chapter 13
s places, among others Notre Dame and St. Étienne du Mont, and afterwards for hours in the Bois de Boulogne, which was new to me, and as beautiful as new. Dined with Appleton, and then with him and Miss Hensler Afterwards Countess of Edla, and wife of Ferdinand, titular king of Portugal. (our Boston singer), to the Opera Lyrique, where I heard Oberon. March 28. Plunged into the abyss of the Louvre galleries; dined with Mr. Edward Brooks, and then tired myself at the Concert Musard. March 29. Beautiful day; called again at Crawford's; his wife told me that he had expressed a desire to see me. The diseased eye was covered with a shade; but the other eye and his face looked well. The fatal disease seems, however, daily to assert its power, and has already touched the brain. I held his hand, and expressed my fervent good wishes, and then after a few minutes left. I was told that it would not do to stay long. Before he came into the room, his faithful Italian servant, when I to
March 30th (search for this): chapter 13
ful Italian servant, when I told him I was a friend of Crawford for eighteen years, fell on his knees before me, and poured out his affection and his grief for his master. The whole visit moved me much. This beautiful genius seems to be drawing to its close. He died October 10 of the same year. In the evening dined with Mr. Munroe, the banker; Fellow-passenger in December. 1837. Ante, vol. i. p. 215. afterwards the Theatre Francais, to hear L'ami à la Campagne, a pleasant piece. March 30. Drove with Mr. and Mrs. George B. Emerson Mr. Emerson (1797-1881) was the widely known educator, Ante, vol. II. pp. 158-288; vol. III. p. 2. to the museum of porcelain at Sevres, which was interesting. Dined with them, and then with Mr. Emerson went to the French opera, where La Favorita was played. Of course the show was fine; but I have heard the chief parts sung with more effect in Boston by an Italian company. March 31. Rain and unpleasant weather. Dined with Mr. and Mrs. Gr
March 31st (search for this): chapter 13
ancais, to hear L'ami à la Campagne, a pleasant piece. March 30. Drove with Mr. and Mrs. George B. Emerson Mr. Emerson (1797-1881) was the widely known educator, Ante, vol. II. pp. 158-288; vol. III. p. 2. to the museum of porcelain at Sevres, which was interesting. Dined with them, and then with Mr. Emerson went to the French opera, where La Favorita was played. Of course the show was fine; but I have heard the chief parts sung with more effect in Boston by an Italian company. March 31. Rain and unpleasant weather. Dined with Mr. and Mrs. Greene at their lodgings, beyond the Luxembourg. Received to-day an interesting call from the Comte de Circourt. Adolphe de Circourt, who died in 1879, at the age of seventy-eight. Ante, vol. i. p. 235. Boston Advertiser, Jan. 10, 1880, which contains Mr. Winthrop's tribute to the count. April 1. Visited the Gobelins; dined at the Cafe Anglais; passed an hour at the reception of Mrs. F. Brooks in the evening; afterwards went to
press the applause which, in violation of the rules, greeted his entrance into the hall. The Thirty-fifth Congress, meeting Dec. 7, 1857, was occupied with a debate on slavery in Kansas, from the beginning of the session to the end of the next April. The Administration still held the Senate, and had recovered the House. The pro-slavery party in the Territory had, by means of a legislature and constitutional convention originating in violence and fraud, caused the so-called Lecompton constitherto during the session Sumner was hoping that he was near the end of his disability, and at times assured inquirers that he was almost well; but a difficulty in walking and in rising from his seat reminded him that he was still an invalid. In April, while at Washington, he suffered a relapse. With no immediate cause that was apparent except a slight over-exertion, he was attacked with severe pains in the back and pressure on the brain, attended with lameness and exhaustion. He could not r
was played. Of course the show was fine; but I have heard the chief parts sung with more effect in Boston by an Italian company. March 31. Rain and unpleasant weather. Dined with Mr. and Mrs. Greene at their lodgings, beyond the Luxembourg. Received to-day an interesting call from the Comte de Circourt. Adolphe de Circourt, who died in 1879, at the age of seventy-eight. Ante, vol. i. p. 235. Boston Advertiser, Jan. 10, 1880, which contains Mr. Winthrop's tribute to the count. April 1. Visited the Gobelins; dined at the Cafe Anglais; passed an hour at the reception of Mrs. F. Brooks in the evening; afterwards went to the reception of the Comte de Colonna Walewski, Minister for Foreign Affairs. The hotel was splendid, and the company elegant. His resemblance to his father is marked, 1810-1868. Reputed son of Napoleon I., and minister of foreign affairs, 1855-1860. his manners cordial and distinguished. I made haste to speak of M. Boileau, the French secretary at Was
nd minister of foreign affairs, 1855-1860. his manners cordial and distinguished. I made haste to speak of M. Boileau, the French secretary at Washington, and to commend him warmly. The minister coolly said that he had married a woman without fortune, and therefore could not await the slow course of his diplomatic career; He married a daughter of Thomas H. Benton, former senator from Missouri. he was to pass into the consular, and could not repass. This was because of his marriage! April 2. Some time this morning at the reception of the Comtesse de Circourt; dined at Very's, Palais Royal; afterwards, at the Vaudeville, heard a piece which has a great run,—the Faux Bons Hommes. The acting was spirited and natural. April 4. Still suffering from my cold, and stayed at home all day till evening. M. de Tocqueville called. His conversation was quite interesting. He did not disguise his opposition to the government. Alluding to Walewski, De Morny, (1811-1865.) Reputed son
hout fortune, and therefore could not await the slow course of his diplomatic career; He married a daughter of Thomas H. Benton, former senator from Missouri. he was to pass into the consular, and could not repass. This was because of his marriage! April 2. Some time this morning at the reception of the Comtesse de Circourt; dined at Very's, Palais Royal; afterwards, at the Vaudeville, heard a piece which has a great run,—the Faux Bons Hommes. The acting was spirited and natural. April 4. Still suffering from my cold, and stayed at home all day till evening. M. de Tocqueville called. His conversation was quite interesting. He did not disguise his opposition to the government. Alluding to Walewski, De Morny, (1811-1865.) Reputed son of Queen Hortense and Comte de Flahaut, and as such half-brother of the emperor. and the emperor, An allusion to the relations between Queen Hortense and the Dutch admiral Verhuel. he said that it was gouvernement de batards. There was
a judge of the Court of Cassation, that they were not in favor of the existing state of things. I then made bold to inquire how many of the Society were on this side. To my astonishment, after carefully surveying the company, they replied that Michel Chevalier alone, and perhaps my next neighbor the Comte de Kergorlay, un petit peu, were for the existing state of things. This confirmed a remark which I have repeatedly heard, that the intelligence of the country is against the emperor. April 5. Stayed at home till evening, still troubled with my cold. Dined with Appleton pleasantly; then drove to Michel Chevalier, who received quite en grand seigneur. His principal room was hung with choice pictures bought from the pillage of the Tuileries in 1848. I liked him much better than at first, and his wife seemed quite pleasant. From there I went to the Waterstons, who had invited a few friends at their hotel, among whom was Madame Laugel Daughter of Mrs. Maria Weston Chapman. (A
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