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Browsing named entities in a specific section of An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps.. Search the whole document.

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low land. The position of the enemy was much higher, with rising hillocks up and down the face of the swamp, which were, of course, converted into earthworks, and mounted not less than twenty-two guns, commanded by their accomplished artillerist Ayers, (I follow Yankee authorities.) It was impossible for us to use our guns with much effect, since they were always assailed by enfilade. To obviate this, we were constructing a powerful battery in the rear of the first, the work being chiefly eking to return, so that scores fell right and left into the swamp, and were half buried in mud and water. The saddest part is yet to tell. Smith, who commanded the Yankee brigade, seeing his men overcome and slaughtered in the battery, ordered Ayers's twenty-two guns to open fire, in order to cover the retreat, but in doing this, their shells killed as many of their own men as of ours. The Louisianians in the battery and the Georgians in the rifle-pits continued the work of destruction, and
N. P. Banks (search for this): chapter 20
a great. success over them; but the truth was all guns were quietly removed and the batteries abandoned long before the gunboats gave their final shellings. A great move was evidently preparing by both parties, but few could guess its object. Banks and others at Harper's Ferry were in great force, and were beginning to move up the Shenandoah slowly and cautiously. General ( Stonewall ) Jackson had been detached from Manassas before Christmas, with about three thousand men, which, together ot more. He was ably seconded by Generals Ewell and Ashby, and no three men in the Confederacy knew the country better. Although their force was small, and that of the enemy large, they unexpectedly appeared and disappeared like phantoms before Banks and Shields, acting like Jack-o‘--lanterns to draw them on to destruction. Our position on the Upper Potomac at Leesburgh was also threatened at not less than four points, namely, westward, from Lovettsville and Harper's Ferry; northward, fro
G. T. Beauregard (search for this): chapter 20
nd. When the war broke out, Robert E. Lee was a lieutenant-colonel of cavalry in the United States army, but was generally considered to be the first engineer in the service. lie had greatly distinguished himself in Mexico, and shared with Beauregard the highest honors of that campaign. It was Scott's practice never to patronize subordinate talent, although all his renown was achieved by it; so that while he continually thrust himself upon popular favor, and obtained the highest rank possi Minister of War, and, upon going to Richmond, was installed in that office, and fulfilled its Herculean duties with great talent and despatch. The line of the Rapidan and Rappahannock rivers was selected by him as our point of defence; while Beauregard preferred Manassas and Bull Run-much inferior situations, although accidental victory crowned our efforts and immortalized the latter place. The defeat of Pegram in Western Virginia by McClellan and Rosecrans, at Rich Mountain, occurred before
ally, that when the enemy marched up the Peninsula, their progress was suddenly arrested by a long line of powerful fortifications belting the country, from York River to James River, and completely stopping further invasion. 'Tis true, that McClellan's force was well handled, and fox the most part lay before Yorktown before our troops were there in strength to oppose them. For ten days, indeed, Magruder displayed his ten thousand men and few guns to such advantage that both McClellan and Burnside believed that Lee and Johnston were there before them. The whole army, however, arrived within a few days, and the breastworks frowned with real cannon. But while both armies are resting along their extensive lines, let me say a few words regarding General Lee and the various fortifications on this peninsula from Yorktown to Richmond. When the war broke out, Robert E. Lee was a lieutenant-colonel of cavalry in the United States army, but was generally considered to be the first eng
Picayune Butler (search for this): chapter 20
his duty was assigned to General Magruder, who often ventured to the vicinity of Newport News, (the most southern point of the peninsula,) and greatly annoyed General Butler, who then commanded the fortress. Butler was tempted to open the campaign of 1861 before Scott, by marching upon Magruder in the hope of overwhelming him. HaButler was tempted to open the campaign of 1861 before Scott, by marching upon Magruder in the hope of overwhelming him. Having made his preparations, he found the Confederates posted at the village of Little Bethel, and was soundly thrashed by a much inferior force in less than sixty minutes. Magruder remained master of the peninsula, and scoured the country between Yorktown and Newport News until the close of the year. His pickets were numerous and vigilant, and captured several hundred negroes who had run away from their masters and sought the Yankee lines. Following the example of Butler, Magruder set the contrabands to work on his chain of fortifications, extending from Yorktown (on the York River) south-westwardly along the banks of the shallow Warwick to Mulberry P
tomac became wonderfully silent. The Federals claimed a great. success over them; but the truth was all guns were quietly removed and the batteries abandoned long before the gunboats gave their final shellings. A great move was evidently preparing by both parties, but few could guess its object. Banks and others at Harper's Ferry were in great force, and were beginning to move up the Shenandoah slowly and cautiously. General ( Stonewall ) Jackson had been detached from Manassas before Christmas, with about three thousand men, which, together with those already in the valley, might make a total of ten thousand, but certainly not more. He was ably seconded by Generals Ewell and Ashby, and no three men in the Confederacy knew the country better. Although their force was small, and that of the enemy large, they unexpectedly appeared and disappeared like phantoms before Banks and Shields, acting like Jack-o‘--lanterns to draw them on to destruction. Our position on the Upper Pot
boats gave their final shellings. A great move was evidently preparing by both parties, but few could guess its object. Banks and others at Harper's Ferry were in great force, and were beginning to move up the Shenandoah slowly and cautiously. General ( Stonewall ) Jackson had been detached from Manassas before Christmas, with about three thousand men, which, together with those already in the valley, might make a total of ten thousand, but certainly not more. He was ably seconded by Generals Ewell and Ashby, and no three men in the Confederacy knew the country better. Although their force was small, and that of the enemy large, they unexpectedly appeared and disappeared like phantoms before Banks and Shields, acting like Jack-o‘--lanterns to draw them on to destruction. Our position on the Upper Potomac at Leesburgh was also threatened at not less than four points, namely, westward, from Lovettsville and Harper's Ferry; northward, from Point of Rocks; eastward, from Edwards's
rginia by McClellan and Rosecrans, at Rich Mountain, occurred before Manassas, as I have mentioned in another place. A few weeks after the Yankee rout at Manassas, Lee was sent to Western Virginia, with only a few raw recruits, under Wise and Floyd, to contend against the numerous and well-provided thousands who flocked to the Federal standard from Ohio and other adjacent States, having canal and railroad communication beyond all their necessities. What Lee needed in men he made up by skilasion; and thus' the time passed, until the fall of heavy snows completely blocked up the roads, and rendered all that mountainous region an inhospitable waste. As Charleston (South-Carolina) was threatened, Lee left the care of his troops to Floyd, and took command there, putting the coasts and harbors in complete defence, and rendering his work almost impregnable. The extensive works, however, which he had planned for the defence of Richmond and its vicinity, occupied much of his time, a
D. H. Hill (search for this): chapter 20
h army corps, in breaking up quarters for the march, effectually destroyed every thing that could not find transportation, so that when the enemy advanced they found naught but smoking ruins and shattered breastworks. With regard to our brigade, Hill had so arranged it, that as we marched out at three A. M., (March fourth,) immense fires burst out in the valley and on the hills from Harper's Ferry to within a few miles of Drainsville, effectually destroying immense stacks of wheat, straw, hay, world did so much with such indifferent resources, While Huger was preparing to evacuate Norfolk, most of our troops were retracing their steps up the peninsula towards Richmond, and not one brigade was unnecessarily detained at Yorktown. General D. H. Hill commanded Yorktown and the left wing; Magruder the right; Longstreet the centre; while Johnston was chief over all. Many episodes and incidents worthy of remembrance daily occurred between the advanced posts of both armies, which served to
Benjamin Huger (search for this): chapter 20
and industry, but are of no avail, for the enemy can ascend the rivers on either hand, and then we are emphatically cooped up, to be destroyed at leisure. Lee and Johnston saw that our position was untenable, but determined to hold. it until Huger, at Norfolk, should have dismantled his many fortifications, destroyed the naval establishments, and evacuated the seaboard. This was a military necessity. We had no navy, and could not expect to contend with a first-class naval power in arms ain its encounter with the United States vessels, and the names of the Merrimac, Manassas, Arkansas,. Sumter, and Nashville can never be forgotten; and it is doubtful whether any navy in the world did so much with such indifferent resources, While Huger was preparing to evacuate Norfolk, most of our troops were retracing their steps up the peninsula towards Richmond, and not one brigade was unnecessarily detained at Yorktown. General D. H. Hill commanded Yorktown and the left wing; Magruder the
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