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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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April 12th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 62
ur forces. Your heroic defence will entitle you to be treated as prisoners of war, but the surrender must be unconditional. I await your answer. Forrest, Major-General, commanding. headquarters United States forces, Fort Pillow, Tennessee, April 12, 1864. Major-General Forrest, commanding Confederate Forces: General: Your demand for the surrender of United States forces under my command, received. I ask one hour for consultation with my officers and the commander of gunboat No. 7, at thise twenty minutes for consideration. At the expiration of that time if you do not capitulate, I will assault your works. Your obedient servant, Forrest, Major-General, commanding. headquarters United States forces, Fort Pillow, Tennessee, April 12, 1864. Major-General Forrest, commanding Confederate Forces: General: Your second demand for the surrender of my forces is received. The demand will not be complied with. Your obedient servant, L. F. Booth, Major, commanding U. S. Forces, F
May 11th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 62
nd the unflinching bravery and endurance of my troops, and with a consciousness that I have done nothing to produce, but all in my power, consistent with honor and the personal safety of myself and command, to prevent it, I leave with you the responsibility of bringing about, to use your own language, a state of affairs too fearful for contemplation. I am, General, Yours, very respectfully, N. B. Forrest, Major-General. Official Memoranda. Cahaba hospital, Cahaba, Alabama, May 11, 1864. Colonel H. C. Davis commanding Post Cahaba: Colonel: I herewith transmit you, as near as my memory serves me, according to promise, the demand made by Major-General Forrest C. S. A., for the surrender of Fort Pillow, Tennessee: Major Booth, commanding U. S. Forces, Fort Pillow, Tennessee: I have force sufficient to take your works by assault. I therefore demand an unconditional surrender of all your forces. Your heroic defence will entitle you to be treated as prisoners of
May 16th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 62
you pretend to be aiding are not considered entirely responsible for their acts, influenced as they are by the superior intellect of their white brothers. I enclose for your consideration certain papers touching the Fort Pillow affair, which were procured from the writer after the exaggerated statements of your press were seen. I am, General, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, S. D. Lee, Lieutenant-General, commanding. Enclosure in the foregoing. Cahaba, Albama, May 16, 1864. I was one of the bearers of the flag of truce, on the part of the United States authorities, at Fort Pillow. A majority of the officers of the garrison doubted whether General Forrest was present, and had the impression that it was a ruse to induce the surrender of the fort. At the second meeting of the flag of truce, General Forrest announced himself as being General Forrest; but the officers who accompanied the flag, being unacquainted with the General, doubted his word, and it wa
May 19th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 62
will not be complied with. Your obedient servant, L. F. Booth, Major, commanding U. S. Forces, Fort Pillow Colonel H. C. Davis : I give you the above for your own satisfaction from memory. I think it is true in substance. My present condition would preclude the idea of this being an official statement. I am Colonel, your obedient servant, John T. Young, Captain Company A, Twenty-fourth Missouri Inf. Vols. Captain J. T. Young to Major-General Forrest. Cahaba, Alabama May 19, 1864. Major-General Forrest, C. S. A.: General: Your request, made through Judge P. T. Scroggs, that I should make a statement of the treatment of the Federal dead and wounded at Fort Pillow, has been made known to me. Details from Federal prisoners were made to collect the dead and wounded. The dead were buried by their surviving comrades. I saw no ill treatment of their wounded on the evening of the battle, or next morning. My friend, Lieutenant Leaming, Adjutant Thirteenth Tennessee C
June 14th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 62
the onus shall be with the Federal commander. I would like that the onus be put where it properly belongs, before the public, should the extremity arise. The correspondence is not complete yet, and the Department will be informed of the result at the earliest practicable moment. I am, General, yours respectfully, S. D. Lee, Lieutenant-General. General S. Cooper, A. and L G., Richmond, Va. General Forrest to General Washburn. headquarters Forrest's cavalry, in the field, June 14, 1864. Major-General Washburn, commanding United States Forces, Memphis: General: I have the honor herewith to enclose copy of letter received from Brigadier-General Buford, commanding United States forces at Helena, Arkansas, addressed to Colonel E. W. Rucker, commanding Sixth regiment of this command; also a letter from myself to General Buford, which I respectfully request you will read and forward to him. There is a matter also to which I desire to call your attention, which, until
June 17th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 62
ge of the Surgeon left with them. I made such an arrangement with Major-General Hurlbut when he was in command of Memphis, and am willing to renew it, provided it is desired, as it would be better than to subject them to the long and fatiguing delay necessary to a regular exchange at City Point, Virginia. I am, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, N. B. Forrest, Major-General General Washburn to General Lee. headquarters District of West Tennessee, Memphis, Tenn., June 17, 1864. Major-General S. D. Lee, commanding Confederate Forces near Tupelo, Miss.: General: When I heard that the forces of Brigadier-General Sturgis had been driven back, and a portion of them probably captured, I felt considerable solicitude for the fate of the two colored regiments that formed a part of the command, until I was informed that the Confederate forces were commanded by you. When I learned that, I became satisfied that no atrocities would be committed upon those troops, but th
June 19th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 62
ommand, I would thank you to inform me, with as little delay as possible, if it is your intention, or the intention of the Confederate government, to murder colored soldiers that may fall into your hands, or treat them as prisoners of war, and subject to be exchanged as other prisoners. I am, General, respectfully, Your obedient servant, C. C. Washburn, Major-General, commanding. General Washburn to General Forrest. headquarters District of West Tennessee, Memphis, Tenn., June 19, 1864. Major-General N. B. Forrest, commanding Confederate Forces: General: Your communication of the fourteenth instant is received. The letter to Brigadier-General Buford will be forwarded to him. In regard to that part of your letter which relates to colored troops, I beg to say that I have already sent a communication on the subject to the officer in command of the Confederate forces at Tupelo. Having understood that Major-General S. D. Lee was in command there, I directed my let
June 20th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 62
the truth of what I assert. I beg leave to say to you that this transaction hardly justifies your remark, that your operations have been conducted on civilized principles; and until you take some steps to bring the perpetrators of this outrage to justice, the world will not fail to believe that it had your sanction. I am, General, Your obedient servant, C. C. Washburn, Major-General, commanding. General Forrest to General Washburn. headquarters Forrest's cavalry, Tupelo, June 20, 1864. Major-General C. C. Washburn, commanding U. S. Forces, Memphis, Tenn.: General: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt (per flag of truce) of your letter of the seventeenth instant, addressed to Majbr-General S. D. Lee, or Officer commanding Confederate forces near Tupelo. I have forwarded it to General Lee, with a copy of this letter. I regard your letter as discourteous to the commanding officer of this department, and grossly insulting to myself. You seek by implied th
June 23rd, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 62
ing, as I do, that I have the approval of my government, my people, and my conscience as to the past, and with the firm belief that I will be sustained by them in my future policy, it is left with you to determine what that policy shall be, whether in accordance with the laws of civilized nations or in violation of them. I am, General, yours, Very respectfully, N. B. Forrest, Major-General. General Forrest to General Washburn. headquarters Forrest's cavalry, in the field, June 23, 1864. Major-General C. C. Washburn, commanding District of West Tennessee, Memphis, Tenn.: Your communication of the nineteenth inst. is received, in which you say you are left in doubt as to the course the Confederate government intends to pursue hereafter in regard to colored troops. Allow me to say that this is a subject upon which I did not and do not propose to enlighten you. It is a matter to be settled by our governments through their proper officers, and I respectfully refer you
June 28th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 62
you may expect such retaliation as the laws of war justify. That you may know what the laws of war are, as understood by my government, I beg leave to enclose a copy of General Orders No. 100 from the War Department Adjutant-General's Office, Washington, April twenty-four, 1863. I have the honor to be, sir, Very respectfully yours, C. C. Washburn, Major-General. General Lee to General Washburn. headquarters Department Alabama, Mississippi, and East Louisian, Meridian, June 28, 1864. Major-General C, C. Washburn, commanding Federal Forces at Memphis, Tennessee: General: I am in receipt of your letter of the seventeenth inst, and have also before me the rely of Major-General Forrest thereto. Though that reply is full, and is approved by me, yet I deem it proper to communicate with you upon a subject so seriously affecting our future conduct and that of the troops under our respective commands. Your communication is by no means respectful to me, and is by impli
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