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Browsing named entities in Euripides, Rhesus (ed. E. P. Coleridge).

Found 216 total hits in 63 results.

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Greece (Greece) (search for this): card 233
Chorus May he come to the ships! May he reach the army of Hellas and spy it out, then turn again and reach the altars of his father's home in Ilium! May he mount the chariot drawn by Phthia's horses, when our master has sacked Achaea's camp, those horses that the sea-god gave to Peleus, son of Aeacus.
Phrygia (Turkey) (search for this): card 242
Chorus For he alone had heart enough for home and country to go and spy on the naval station; I admire his spirit; how few stout hearts there are, when on the sea the sunlight dies and the city labors in the surge. Phrygia yet has left a valiant few, and bold hearts in the battle's press; it is only Mysia's sons who scorn us as allies.
Mysia (Turkey) (search for this): card 242
Chorus For he alone had heart enough for home and country to go and spy on the naval station; I admire his spirit; how few stout hearts there are, when on the sea the sunlight dies and the city labors in the surge. Phrygia yet has left a valiant few, and bold hearts in the battle's press; it is only Mysia's sons who scorn us as allies.
Troy (Turkey) (search for this): card 254
Chorus Which of the Achaeans will the earth-treading murderer slay in their beds, as he pretends to be a four-footed beast on the ground? May he lay Menelaus low, slay Agamemnon and bring his head to Helen's hands, causing her to lament her evil kinsman, who has come against my city, against the land of Troy with his army of a thousand ships.
Thrace (Greece) (search for this): card 264
ch news as I am bearing to you now. Hector Often the rustic mind is afflicted with dullness; so you have probably come to this ill-suited place to tell your master, in armor, about the sheep! Do you not know my palace or my father's throne, where you should carry your tale when you have prospered with your flocks? Messenger Dull we herdsmen are; I do not dispute it. But none the less I bring joyful news to you. Hector Cease your tale of how the sheep-fold fares; I have battles to fight and spears to wield. Messenger The very things of which I, too, came to tell you; for a chieftain of a countless army is on his way to join you as your friend and ally of this land. Hector His country? and the home that he has left? Messenger Thrace; men call his father Strymon. Hector Did you say that Rhesus was setting foot in Troy? Messenger You have it; and lighten me of half my speech. Hector How is it that he comes to Ida's meadows, wandering from the broad wagon track across the plain?
Troy (Turkey) (search for this): card 264
ch news as I am bearing to you now. Hector Often the rustic mind is afflicted with dullness; so you have probably come to this ill-suited place to tell your master, in armor, about the sheep! Do you not know my palace or my father's throne, where you should carry your tale when you have prospered with your flocks? Messenger Dull we herdsmen are; I do not dispute it. But none the less I bring joyful news to you. Hector Cease your tale of how the sheep-fold fares; I have battles to fight and spears to wield. Messenger The very things of which I, too, came to tell you; for a chieftain of a countless army is on his way to join you as your friend and ally of this land. Hector His country? and the home that he has left? Messenger Thrace; men call his father Strymon. Hector Did you say that Rhesus was setting foot in Troy? Messenger You have it; and lighten me of half my speech. Hector How is it that he comes to Ida's meadows, wandering from the broad wagon track across the plain?
Troy (Turkey) (search for this): card 284
he was called, that came to the city to help the sons of Priam. And when I had heard all I wished to learn, I stood still; and I see Rhesus mounted like a god upon his Thracian chariot. Of gold was the yoke that linked the necks of his horses brighter than the snow; and on his shoulders flashed his shield with figures welded in gold; while a gorgon of bronze like that on the aegis of the goddess was bound upon the front of his horses, ringing out its note of fear with many a bell. The number of his army you could not reckon to an exact sum, for it was beyond one's comprehension; many knights, many ranks of targeteers, many archers, a great crowd of light-armed troops, arrayed in Thracian garb, to bear them company. Such the man who comes to Troy's assistance, whom the son of Peleus will never escape, either if he tries to escape or if he meets him spear to spear. Chorus Leader Whenever the gods stand by the citizens, the tide of fortune glides with easy flow to a successful goal.
Ilium (Turkey) (search for this): card 319
have no need of those who did not share our toils long since, when Ares, driving all before him, was rending the sails of our ship of state with his tempestuous blast. Rhesus has shown the friendship he then bore to Troy; for he comes to the feast, although he was not with the hunters when they took the prey, nor did he join his spear with theirs. Chorus Leader You are right to scorn and blame such friends; yet welcome those who wish to help the state. Chorus Leader We who have long kept Ilium safe are sufficient. Chorus Are you so sure you have already caught the foe? Hector I am sure; tomorrow's light will make that plain. Chorus Leader Beware of what may happen; often fortune veers about. Hector I loath the friend who brings his help too late. But let him, since he has arrived, come to our table not as an ally but as a guest; for the gratitude of Priam's sons is forfeit in his case. Chorus Leader O prince, to turn away allies earns hatred. Messenger His mere appearance
Troy (Turkey) (search for this): card 319
Hector I shall find many friends now that fortune smiles upon my warring and Zeus is on my side. But we have no need of those who did not share our toils long since, when Ares, driving all before him, was rending the sails of our ship of state with his tempestuous blast. Rhesus has shown the friendship he then bore to Troy; for he comes to the feast, although he was not with the hunters when they took the prey, nor did he join his spear with theirs. Chorus Leader You are right to scorn and blame such friends; yet welcome those who wish to help the state. Chorus Leader We who have long kept Ilium safe are sufficient. Chorus Are you so sure you have already caught the foe? Hector I am sure; tomorrow's light will make that plain. Chorus Leader Beware of what may happen; often fortune veers about. Hector I loath the friend who brings his help too late. But let him, since he has arrived, come to our table not as an ally but as a guest; for the gratitude of Priam's sons is forfei
Phrygia (Turkey) (search for this): card 351
Chorus Strymon, who begot you, his strong young son, that day his swirling waters found a refuge in the tuneful Muse's virgin bosom. You are my Zeus, my god of light, as you come driving your dappled horses. Now, O Phrygia, O my country, now may you by God's grace address Zeus the Deliverer!
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