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heir alliance, he sought a consort from their city, they replied with independent feeling that he might have their hangman's daughter. (See Diodorus Siculus, xiv. 44.) Had the other states of Magna Grecia displayed the same energy, the ambitious views of this artful prince might have been frustrated; but after the defeat of their forces on the Elleporus, now Callipari, they succumbed, and Rhegium, after a gallant defence which lasted nearly a year, was compelled to yield, about the year 398 B. C. The insulting tyrant sentenced the heroic Phyton, who had commanded the town, to a cruel death, and removed the few inhabitants that remained to Sicily. but his son (Dionysius the younger) partly restored it,B. C. 360. and called it Phœbia. During the war with Pyrrhus, a body of Campanians destroyed most of the citizens against the faith of treaties,B. C. 280. and a little before the Marsic or social war, earthquakes destroyed most of the towns;B.C. 91. but after Augustus Cæ
, it is supposed that Proserpine came over from Sicily to gather them, and from thence the custom among women of this city, to gather flowers and plait garlands, prevailed to such an extent, that they now think it shameful to wear purchased garlands at the festivals.There was a temple erected to Proserpine in these meadows, and a building called Amalthea's horn, raised by Gelon of Syracuse. It also possesses a harbourThe present harbour of Bivona. made by Agathocles,He reigned from B. C. 317 to B. C. 289. the tyrant of Sicily, when he was in possession of the town. On sailing hence to the Portus Herculis,Now Le Formicole. The promontory named Capo Vaticano seems to have been anciently known under the same appellation. we come to the point where the headlands of Italy, as they stretch towards the Strait [of Sicily], begin to turn westward. In this voyage we pass Medma,Medma, or Mesma, was situated on the right bank of the river Mesima, which seems to retain traces of the nam
le, nearly two miles north of Torre Loppa, as the locality of this ancient site. The silver coins of Temesa are scarce. They have the Greek epigraph, TEM. of the Bruttii, which at present is called Tempsa. It was founded by the Ausonians; afterwards the Ætolians, under the command of Thoas, gained possession of it. These were expelled by the Bruttii; Hannibal and the Romans have overthrown the Bruttii.After the second Punic war it was colonized by the Romans, who called it Tempsa, B. C. 195. In the vicinity of Temesa is the Heroum of Polites, one of the companions of Ulysses. It is surrounded by a thick grove of wild olives. He was treacherously slain by the barbarians, and became in consequence very wrathful, and his shade so tormented the inhabitants that they submitted to pay him a tribute, according to the direction of a certain oracle. Thus it became a proverb amongst them, Let no one offend the hero of Temesa, for they said that [for a long time heWe concur with Kr
rabo here refers to Morgantium in Sicily, which had disappeared in his days, and which he mentions in b. vi. c. ii. § 4. thus received its name from the Morgetes. But the city of the Rhegini became very powerful, and possessed many dependent settlements. It has always been a bulwark for us against the island [of Sicily], and, indeed, has recently served to that purpose when Sextus Pompeins alienated Sicily.Sextus Pompeius, having received from the senate the command of the fleet, B. C. 43, in a short time made himself master of Sicily, which he held till 36. It was called Rhegium either, as Æschylus says, because of the convulsion which had taken place in this region; for Sicily was broken from the continent by earthquakes, Whence it is called Rhegium.This is a quotation from one of the missing works of Æschylus. Others,Virgil speaks of this great catastrophe, Æn. iii. 414, Hæc loca, vi quondam et vasta convulsa ruina (Tantum ævi longinqua valet mutare vetustas<
Hist. Anim. ii. 36. for which reason they keep their horses away from the river. The Crati turns the hair of those who bathe in it yellow, and sometimes white, but has been found salutary for the cure of many disorders. Thurii, after having flourished for a long time, became a continual prey to the aggressions of the Leucani,From B. C. 390 to 290. and afterwards the Tarentini troubling them, they appealed to the Romans for succour, who, in course of time, sent a colonyAbout B. C. 194. when it was nearly deserted, and changed the name of the city to Copiæ.Cæsar however calls it Thurii, and designates it a municipal town. Civ. Bell. iii. 22. After Thurii is Lagaria,Now La Nucara. a garrison fort; it was originally settled by EpeiusIt is not ascertained whether this leader were the architect of the Horse of Troy. and the Phocenses; hence is derived the Lagaritan wine, sweet and delicate, and much recommended by the physicians, as is likewise the Thurian wine, which is
us to the Molossian king. Scylax, in his Periplus, seems to place Pandosia, together with Clampetia and Terina, near the western coast. was formerly the residence of the Œnotrian kings. After Cosentia is Hipponium,Afterwards Vibo Valentia, now Monte-Leone. founded by the Locrians.Surnamed the Epizephyrii. Heyne supposes this took place B. C. 388. The Romans took it from the Bruttii, who were in possession of it at a subsequent period, and changed the name into Vibo-Valentia.B. C. 193. And because the meadows in its vicinity are luxuriant and full of flowers, it is supposed that Proserpine came over from Sicily to gather them, and from thence the custom among women of this city, to gather flowers and plait garlands, prevailed to such an extent, that they now think it shameful to wear purchased garlands at the festivals.There was a temple erected to Proserpine in these meadows, and a building called Amalthea's horn, raised by Gelon of Syracuse. It also possesses a har
the Latins. the three having the same name. This colony was founded471 years before the Christian era. by Micythus, then governor of Messina in Sicily; but those who were located here, except a few, abandoned the place. After Pyxus are the gulf,Gulf of Policastro. the river,Now the river Laino. and the cityCalled Laino in the time of Cluverius. Lib. iv. cap. 14. of Laüs. This, the lastUpon this coast. city of the Leucani, situate a little above the sea, is a colonyFounded about the year 510 B. C. of the Sybarites, and is distant from Ælea 400 stadia. The whole circuit of Leucania, by sea is 650 stadia. Near to Latis is seen the tomb of Draco, one of the companions of Ulysses, and the oracular response, given to the Italian Greeks, alludes to him: Some day, around the Dragon's stony tomb, A mighty multitude shall meet their doom. For the Greeks of Italy, enticed by this prophecy, marched against Laiis, and were defeated by the Leucani.About the year 390 before the
rrhus, a body of Campanians destroyed most of the citizens against the faith of treaties,B. C. 280. and a little before the Marsic or social war, earthquakes destroyed most of the towns;B.C. 91. but after Augustus Cæsar had driven Sextus Pompeius out of Sicily, when he saw that the city was deficient of inhabitants, he appointed certain of those who accompanied the expedition to reside there, and it is now tolerably well peopled.The defeat of Sextus Pompeins is referred to the year 36 B. C., but there is no precise date mentioned for the establishment of the veteran soldiers in Rhegium, which probably took place about the year 31 B. C. Sailing 50 stadia from Rhegium towards the east, we meet the cape called Leucopetra, from the colour of the rock, where they say the range of the Apennines terminates.Pliny computes the distance from Rhegium to Cape Leucopetra at 12 miles; there is probably some error in the text, as there is no cape which corresponds with the distanc
s, which lies next the Strait of Sicily, were the only people who were called Œnotrians and Italians. The isthmus is 160 stadia across between the two gulfs, namely, that of Hipponium,Golfo di S. Eufemia. which Antiochus called Napitinus, and that of Scylletium.Golfo di Squillace. Scylletium was once a Greek city of note, communicating its name to the gulf. Servius observes that the Athenians who founded the colony were returning from Africa. There was a Greek inscription found in 1791 relative to the Lampadhdo|omi/a, which seems to confirm the tradition of the Athenian origin of Scylletium. It was the birth-place of Cassiodorus. The circumnavigation of the peninsula, which is comprised between this isthmus and the strait, is 2000 stadia. He says that afterwards the names of Italy and of the Œnotrians were extended as far as Metapontium and the Siritis; the Chones, a people of Œnotrian descent, and highly civilized, inhabited these districts, and called their country
e the harbour of Heraclea. Its distance from Heraclea was 24 stadia, and from Thurii about 330.This accords very well with the distance given in the Itinerary of Antoninus. They point out the statue of the Trojan Minerva, which is erected there, as a proof of its colonization by the Trojans. They also relate as a miracle how the statue closed its eyes when the suppliants, who had fled for sanctuary to her shrine, were dragged away by the Ionians after they had taken the city;About B. C. 580. they say that these Ionians came to settle here, when they fled from the yoke of the Lydians, and took the town of the TrojansKramer reads xw/nwn in the text. We have followed the opinion of the French translators, who have rendered it possédée par des Troyens. MSS. give various readings. by force, calling its name Polieum. They show, too, at the present time the statue that closes its eyes. It must, however, require a good courage, not to assert that it appeared to have closed i
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