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Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.38
ves of Lincoln's policy receives these two confirmations. After the return of the former to Richmond, the Convention sent the commission, which has been described, composed of Messrs. Wm. B. Preston, A. H. H. Stuart, and Geo. W. Randolph. They were to ascertain definitely what the President's policy was to be. They endeavored to reach Washington in the early part of the week in which Fort Sumter was bombarded, but were delayed by storms and high water, so that they only reached there via Baltimore, Friday, April 12th. They appeared promptly at the White House, and were put off until Saturday for their formal interview, although Lincoln saw them for a short time. On Saturday Lincoln read to them a written answer to the resolutions of Convention laid before him, which was obviously scarcely dry from the pen of a clerk. This paper, says Mr. Stuart, was ambiguous and evasive, but in the main professed peaceful intentions. Mr. Stuart, in answer to this paper, spoke freely and at larg
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.38
ency. Meantime Mr. Seward, Lincoln's Secretary of State, sent Allen B. Magruder, Esq., as a confidential messenger to Richmond, to hold an interview with Mr Janney (President of the Convention), Mr. Stuart, and other influential members, and to uroon after sent from the Virginia Convention to Washington. In a letter to me, he says: When Colonel Baldwin returned to Richmond, he reported to the four gentlemen above named, and to Mr. Samuel Price, of Greenbrier, the substance of his interview wsurmises concerning the motives of Lincoln's policy receives these two confirmations. After the return of the former to Richmond, the Convention sent the commission, which has been described, composed of Messrs. Wm. B. Preston, A. H. H. Stuart, and Bates, Attorney General, also gave Mr. Stuart the same assurances of peace. The next day the commissioners returned to Richmond, and the very train on which they traveled carried Lincoln's proclamation, calling for the seventy-five thousand men to
Greenbrier (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.38
sed Colonel Baldwin, without promising anything more definite. In order to confirm the accuracy of my own memory, I have submitted the above narrative to the Honorable A. H. H. Stuart, Colonel Baldwin's neighbor and political associate, and the only surviving member of the commission soon after sent from the Virginia Convention to Washington. In a letter to me, he says: When Colonel Baldwin returned to Richmond, he reported to the four gentlemen above named, and to Mr. Samuel Price, of Greenbrier, the substance of his interview with Lincoln substantially as he stated it to you. I asked Colonel Baldwin what was the explanation of this remarkable scene, and especially of Lincoln's perplexity. He replied that the explanation had always appeared to him to be this: When the seven Gulf States had actually seceded, the Lincoln faction were greatly surprised and in great uncertainty what to do; for they had been blind enough to suppose that all Southern opposition to a sectional presid
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.38
le in this connection to recall the fact that when soon after the capture of Fort Sumter and Mr. Lincoln's proclamation, a prominent Northern politician wrote Coloneincoln. Mr. Magruder stated that he was authorized by Mr. Seward to say that Fort Sumter would be evacuated on the Friday of the ensuing week, and that the Pawnee would sail on the following Monday for Charleston, to effect the evacuation. Mr. Seward said that secrecy was all important, and while it was extremely desirable that onel Baldwin, decisively, until they can be peaceably brought back. And open Charleston, &c., as ports of entry, with their ten per cent. tariff. What, then, would . They endeavored to reach Washington in the early part of the week in which Fort Sumter was bombarded, but were delayed by storms and high water, so that they only made the objection that all the goods would be imported through the ports of Charleston, &c., and the sources of revenue dried up. I remember, says Mr. Stuart, that
America (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.38
ruth. The New York Tribune, even, admitted it, violent as it was, and deprecated a Union pinned together with bayonets. Even General Winfield Scott, the military Man Friday, of Federal power, advised that the Government should say: Erring Sisters, go in peace. So strong was the conviction, even in the Northern mind, that such journals as Harper's Weekly and Monthly, shrewdly mercenary in their whole aim, were notoriously courting the secession feeling. New York, the financial capital of America, was well known to be opposed to the faction and to coercion. The previous Congress had expired without daring to pass any coercive measures. The administration was not at all certain that the public opinion of the American people could be made to tolerate anything so illegal and mischievous as a war of coercion. [Subsequent events and declarations betrayed also how well the Lincoln faction knew at the time that it was utterly unlawful. For instance: when Lincoln launched into that war,
Montgomery (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.38
the utter failure of the Peace-Congress, and the rejection of Mr. Crittenden's overtures, the refusal to hear the commissioners. from Mr. Davis' Government at Montgomery, and the secret arming of the Federal Government for attack, had now produced feverish apprehensions in and out of the Convention. Colonel Baldwin considered M my own, the hour after you signed them. Lincoln seemed impressed by his solemnity, and asked a few questions: But what am I to do meantime with those men at Montgomery? Am I to let them go on? Yes, sir, replied Colonel Baldwin, decisively, until they can be peaceably brought back. And open Charleston, &c., as ports of entryeward. The first volume of my life of Jackson had been published in London, in which I characterized the shameless lie told by Seward to the commissioners from Montgomery, through Judge Campbell, touching the evacuation of Sumter. This friend and apologist of Seward said that I was unjust to him, because when he promised the eva
Aquia Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.38
lonel Baldwin to go, furnished with the necessary credentials to Mr. Lincoln. He at first demurred, saying that all his public services had been to Virginia, and that he knew nothing of Washington and the Federal politics, but they replied that this was precisely what qualified him, because his presence there would not excite remark or suspicion. Colonel Baldwin accordingly agreed to the mission, and went with Mr. Magruder the following night, reaching Washington the next morning by the Acquia Creek route a little after dawn, and driving direct to the house of Mr. Magruder's brother. [These gentlemen were brothers of General J. B. Magruder of Virginia]. These prefatory statements prepare the way for Colonel Baldwin's special narrative. He stated that after breakfasting and attending to his toilet at the house of Captain Magruder, he went with Mr. A. B. Magruder, in a carriage, with the glasses carefully raised, to Seward, who took charge of Mr. Baldwin, and went direct with him t
William H. Seward (search for this): chapter 6.38
arriage, with the glasses carefully raised, to Seward, who took charge of Mr. Baldwin, and went dire appeared to wear importance in their aspect Mr. Seward whispered something to the President, who atably committed himself to this policy, without Seward's privity, within the last four days; and the he expressly disclaimed all purpose of war. Mr. Seward and Mr. Bates, Attorney General, also gave Mst table of the Exchange Hotel, and sent it to Seward, asking him if it was genuine. Before Seward'erview with a personal friend and apologist of Seward. The first volume of my life of Jackson had bhich I characterized the shameless lie told by Seward to the commissioners from Montgomery, through ation of Sumter. This friend and apologist of Seward said that I was unjust to him, because when helar rage, converted Lincoln from the policy of Seward to that of Stevens. Hence the former was compt more glaring. When their own chosen leader, Seward, avowed that there was no need for war, they d[14 more...]
J. Bankhead Magruder (search for this): chapter 6.38
d been to Virginia, and that he knew nothing of Washington and the Federal politics, but they replied that this was precisely what qualified him, because his presence there would not excite remark or suspicion. Colonel Baldwin accordingly agreed to the mission, and went with Mr. Magruder the following night, reaching Washington the next morning by the Acquia Creek route a little after dawn, and driving direct to the house of Mr. Magruder's brother. [These gentlemen were brothers of General J. B. Magruder of Virginia]. These prefatory statements prepare the way for Colonel Baldwin's special narrative. He stated that after breakfasting and attending to his toilet at the house of Captain Magruder, he went with Mr. A. B. Magruder, in a carriage, with the glasses carefully raised, to Seward, who took charge of Mr. Baldwin, and went direct with him to the White House, reaching it, he thought, not much after nine o'clock A. M. At the door, the man who was acting as usher, or porter, was
Saturday Lincoln (search for this): chapter 6.38
olonel Baldwin's views and purposes. But Mr. Lincoln's inaugural, with its hints of coercion andn of three ambassadors from the Convention to Lincoln's Government, who should communicate the viewemely desirable that one of them should see Mr. Lincoln, it was equally important that the public shis note of credential or introduction, which Lincoln read, sitting upon the edge of the bed, and sace or a dreadful war would inevitably turn. Lincoln's native good sense, with Colonel Baldwin's ethe radical governors, which had just decided Lincoln to adopt the violent policy. They had especirvile insurrection. Thus they had urged upon Lincoln, that the best way to secure his party triumpgh Lincoln saw them for a short time. On Saturday Lincoln read to them a written answer to the resoctions and threats of popular rage, converted Lincoln from the policy of Seward to that of Stevens.gainst seventeen in mutually destructive war. Lincoln acknowledged the conclusiveness of this reaso[30 more...]
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