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Hatcher's Run (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
h Baxter's Brigade had been pursuing Munford's dismounted cavalry all the way from where we had crossed the White Oak Road, by a wide detour reaching almost to Hatcher's Run, until he had crossed the Ford Road, quite in rear of the breaking lines which Ransom and Wallace and Wood were trying to hold together. I To my grief over gress of the battle. They had been on the ground earlier it seems on retiring from Dinwiddie; but for one reason or another they had one by one retired across Hatcher's Run,--looking after their communications very likely. Private correspondence of Confederate officers present gives some curious details as to a shad dinner on the north side of Hatcher's Run. Pickett returned to the field only after we had all gained the Ford Road at about 6 P. M., but Fitzhugh Lee and Rosser not at all. Pickett narrowly escaped the shots of our men as he attempted to pass them to reach his broken lines towards the White Oak Road. It is also remarkable that General Ro
Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
surely, and amazing. All the repressed feeling of our hearts sprang out towards him. We were ready to blame ourselves if we had been in any way the cause of his trouble. But we thought we had borne a better part than that. We had had a taste of his style of fighting, and we liked it. In some respects it was different from ours; although this was not a case to test all qualities. We had formed some habits of fighting too. Most of us there had been through Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Mine Run, the Wilderness, Spottsylvania, Cold Harbor, Bethesda Church, the North Anna, Petersburg:we had formed habits. We went into a fight with knowledge of what it meant and what was to be done. We went at things with dogged resolution; not much show; not much flare; not much accompaniment of brass instruments. But we could give credit to more brilliant things. We could see how this voice and vision, this swing and color, this vivid impression on the senses, carried
Petersburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
he be removed from the command of the army. (Serial No. 80, p. 35.) It now appears that Warren was in great disfavor with Meade also, after arriving before Petersburg. Meade called upon Warren to ask to be relieved from command of his corps on the alternative that charges would be preferred against him. (Dana's despatch, Jun had been through Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Mine Run, the Wilderness, Spottsylvania, Cold Harbor, Bethesda Church, the North Anna, Petersburg:we had formed habits. We went into a fight with knowledge of what it meant and what was to be done. We went at things with dogged resolution; not much show; nher intended for excuse or sarcasm. He answers that his troops, most of them, had fought at Gettysburg, and through the Wilderness, Spottsylvania, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, and the Weldon Railroad, and none of them had ever but once fought behind breastworks. Ibid, p. 450. The unsteadiness of Ayres' skirmishers was no vita
Five Forks (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
p of loving-kindness on this crowning day of Five Forks were not favorable. Each of them was under early to the left of the enemy's defenses at Five Forks on the White Oak Road. Crawford led, follow about threequarters of a mile eastward from Five Forks, and at the extreme left made a return northnt of religions just then and there, at this Five Forks focus. And it came in this wise. As Ransomfter nightfall the corps was drawn in around Five Forks, for a brief respite. We were all so worn o beyond that field. This is the story of Five Forks within my knowledge of what was done and sufstance of a part of Ayres' Division, carried Five Forks with all its works, angles, and returns, its close in support of Pickett's left flank at Five Forks. Rebellion Records, serial 95, p. 1264. de Warren who helped Sheridan to his fame at Five Forks. So much for the tactics of that battle.ry first thing we did the next morning after Five Forks was to move back to turn this same flank on [13 more...]
Gravelly Run (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
a few others to stay and take a little rest before resuming the tasking duties of the coming day. It was about nine o'clock in the morning when the artillery officer reached Warren's old headquarters, and suddenly rousing Colonel Locke asked where the Fifth Corps was. Locke, so abruptly wakened, his sound sleep bridging the break of his last night's consciousness, rubbed his eyes, and with dazed simplicity answered that when he went to sleep the Fifth Corps was halted to build a bridge at Gravelly Run on the Plank Road. No time was lost in reporting this at headquarters, without making further inquiries as to the whereabouts of the Fifth Corps, now for three hours with Sheridan on the Five Forks Road. Thereupon General Grant forthwith sends General Babcock to tell General Sheridan that if he had any reason to be dissatisfied with General Warren, or as it has since been put, if in his opinion the interests of the service gave occasion for it, he might relieve him from command of his c
Antietam (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
Sheridan! A new view of him, surely, and amazing. All the repressed feeling of our hearts sprang out towards him. We were ready to blame ourselves if we had been in any way the cause of his trouble. But we thought we had borne a better part than that. We had had a taste of his style of fighting, and we liked it. In some respects it was different from ours; although this was not a case to test all qualities. We had formed some habits of fighting too. Most of us there had been through Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Mine Run, the Wilderness, Spottsylvania, Cold Harbor, Bethesda Church, the North Anna, Petersburg:we had formed habits. We went into a fight with knowledge of what it meant and what was to be done. We went at things with dogged resolution; not much show; not much flare; not much accompaniment of brass instruments. But we could give credit to more brilliant things. We could see how this voice and vision, this swing and color, this vivid impr
High Bridge (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
mpossible,--and even the truth made known becomes a consolation. The battle of Five Forks was also the battle of the White Oak Road, on an extended front, in an accidental and isolated position, and at a delayed hour. It was successful, owing to the character of the troops, and the skill and vigor of the commander. Appomattox was a glorious result of strong pushing and hard marching. But both could have been forestalled, and all that fighting, together with that at Sailor's Creek, High Bridge, and Farmville have been concentrated in one grand assault, of which the sharp-edged line along the White Oak Road would have been one blade of the shears, and Ord and Wright and Parke on the main line the other, and the hard and costly ten days chase and struggle would have been spared so many noble men. Lee would not have got a day's start of us in the desperate race. Sheridan cutting the enemy's communications and rolling up their scattering fugitives would have shown his great qualit
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
new view of him, surely, and amazing. All the repressed feeling of our hearts sprang out towards him. We were ready to blame ourselves if we had been in any way the cause of his trouble. But we thought we had borne a better part than that. We had had a taste of his style of fighting, and we liked it. In some respects it was different from ours; although this was not a case to test all qualities. We had formed some habits of fighting too. Most of us there had been through Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Mine Run, the Wilderness, Spottsylvania, Cold Harbor, Bethesda Church, the North Anna, Petersburg:we had formed habits. We went into a fight with knowledge of what it meant and what was to be done. We went at things with dogged resolution; not much show; not much flare; not much accompaniment of brass instruments. But we could give credit to more brilliant things. We could see how this voice and vision, this swing and color, this vivid impression on the
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
we had not much else. This liveliness of mutual interest and support, I may remark, is sometimes of great importance in the developments of a battle. The hardest hold — up was in front of my left center, the First Battalion of the Ig8th Pennsylvania. I rode up to the gallant Glenn, commanding it, and said, Major Glenn, if you will break that line you shall have a colonel's commission! It was a hasty utterance, and the promise unmilitary, perhaps; but my every energy was focused on that s to other recognition, Brevet Colonel of United States Volunteers, --and that phrase, so costly won, so honorable then, made common since, has seemed to me ever after, tame and something like travesty. I sought for him from the Governor of Pennsylvania lineal promotion in his regiment, though he had but few hours to live. But that grade was held by an accomplished gentleman detached from his regiment on office duties in the cities, and there was no place for Glenn. The colonel, dear old Si
R. H. Anderson (search for this): chapter 6
the east of this,--in fact it was a thousand yards away. Mackenzie had crowded off Roberts' cavalry towards its right near Burgess' Mill,--this cavalry not being under Fitzhugh Lee or Munford but taking orders directly from the infantry general R. H. Anderson. My orders were in general to follow Crawford. I had managed, however, to gain towards the left until we had fairly got past Crawford's left rear. Some firing we had heard in the supposed direction of our cavalry, but it did not seeavalry they were at no time on the field. We know now that General Lee afterwards wrote General Wade Hampton in these words: Had you been at Five Forks with your cavalry the disaster would not have befallen my army. Nor does it appear that General Anderson, commanding General Lee's reserves in this quarter, knew anything of the pressing need of them at Five Forks until all was over. So there are some other generals beside Warren who helped Sheridan to his fame at Five Forks. So much fo
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