hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Fitzhugh Lee 376 16 Browse Search
John B. Hood 314 4 Browse Search
James Longstreet 312 12 Browse Search
D. H. Hill 306 36 Browse Search
Thomas J. Jackson 292 0 Browse Search
George B. McClellan 278 2 Browse Search
Lafayette McLaws 278 2 Browse Search
George E. Pickett 217 1 Browse Search
W. H. F. Lee 201 3 Browse Search
George G. Meade 190 4 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox. Search the whole document.

Found 377 total hits in 75 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...
Flat Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 42
ght exchange of cavalry fire. No orders came, the afternoon was passing, further delay seemed perilous. I drew the command off and filed to the right to cross Flat Creek to march for Farmville. The other infantry and trains and artillery followed and kept the march until a late hour, halting for a short rest before daylight. Jetersville, started towards Amelia Court-House to look for us, but General Humphreys, of his Second Corps, learned that our rear-guard was on the north side of Flat Creek on the westward march. General Griffin, of the Fifth Corps, also had information of troops in march west, and General Meade, therefore, changed direction to podore Reed, of his staff, who conducted the column, and put his command in march to follow by the road through Rice's Station. After repairing the bridge at Flat Creek, General Humphreys marched in hot pursuit of our rear-guard, followed by the Sixth Corps, Merritt's and Crook's cavalry moving on the left of our column as we m
Sailor's Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 42
g us and standing across our march. At Sailor's Creek the road forks, --one road to the High Bri on their left flank. Anderson crossed Sailor's Creek, closely followed by Ewell. The route by nable, of his staff, as to the disaster at Sailor's Creek. He drew Mahone's division away, and tookthe enemy had captured the wagon-trains at Sailor's Creek. General Lee exclaimed, Where is Andersonher troops, will you take your division to Sailor's Creek? and I promptly gave the order by the left flank, and off we were for Sailor's Creek, where the disaster had occurred. General Lee rode withthe crossing of the river road overlooking Sailor's Creek, the disaster which had overtaken our armyldier could make, and its noise in rear of Sailor's Creek may have served to increase the confusion vern. I heard nothing of the affair at Sailor's Creek, nor from General Lee, until next morning.The enemy seemed to think they had another Sailor's Creek affair, and part of their attack got in as
St. Paul's church (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 42
and saw Benning's four hundred standing in even line with me, viewing the masses preparing for their march to meet us. During a few moments of quiet, General Lee despatched to Richmond of affairs at Petersburg, and to advise that our troops must abandon their lines and march in retreat as soon as night could cover the move. It was eleven o'clock of the morning when the despatch reached Richmond. It was the Sabbath-day. The city was at profound worship. The President was at St. Paul's Church. My wife was there (rest her spirit!) and heard the pastor, Mr. Minnegerode, read, The Lord is in his holy temple: let all the earth keep silence before him. The full congregation rose, and the air whispered silence. The solemnity was broken as a swift despatch-bearer entered the portals and walked with quiet but rapid steps up the aisle to the chancel. He handed the President a sealed envelope. After reading, the President took his hat and walked with dignity down the aisle. Ser
Jetersville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 42
ose of the cavalry to delay our march while the enemy was passing his heavier column by us to Jetersville. Orders had been sent for provisions to meet us at the Court-House, but they were not thegh Burkeville to join our forces to those of General J. E. Johnston in North Carolina, but at Jetersville, on the 5th, we found the enemy square across the route in force and intrenching, where our cments of the enemy, which latter made some important captures. General Lee was with us at Jetersville, and, after careful reconnoissance, thought the enemy's position too strong to warrant aggress attack. General Ord rested his column for the night at Burkeville. The enemy was quiet at Jetersville, except for a light exchange of cavalry fire. No orders came, the afternoon was passing, furore daylight. Early on the 6th, General Meade advanced for battle, and, not finding us at Jetersville, started towards Amelia Court-House to look for us, but General Humphreys, of his Second Corp
Burkeville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 42
at the Court-House, but they were not there, so we lost the greater part of a day gathering supplies from the farmers. Our purpose had been to march through Burkeville to join our forces to those of General J. E. Johnston in North Carolina, but at Jetersville, on the 5th, we found the enemy square across the route in force andding that his Sixth Corps could not join him till a late hour, decided to wait till next morning for his attack. General Ord rested his column for the night at Burkeville. The enemy was quiet at Jetersville, except for a light exchange of cavalry fire. No orders came, the afternoon was passing, further delay seemed perilous. Id Sixth Corps, putting the Fifth on the Painesville road. General Sheridan despatched General Ord that we had broken away from him and were marching direct for Burkeville. The latter prepared to receive us, but soon learned that we had taken another route. He had previously detached two regiments of infantry (five hundred men),
Bermuda Hundred (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 42
intervening swale. The alarm reached General A. P. Hill, of the Third Corps, who rode off to find his troops, but instead came suddenly upon the enemy's skirmishers in their concealment. He wheeled and made a dash to escape, but the Federal fire had deadly effect, the gallant general fell, and the Southern service lost a sword made bright by brave work upon many heavy fields. General Humphreys, of the Second, followed the move of the Sixth Corps, and General Parke assaulted on the Bermuda Hundred front and at Petersburg. He had partial success at the former, but was repulsed when he met Mahone's strong line. At Petersburg he had more success, capturing twelve guns. General Sheridan, reinforced by Miles's division, was ordered to follow up his work on the right bank. The reinforcements sent under Lieutenant-General Anderson joined General Pickett at night of the 1st, and the combined forces succeeded in getting out of the way of the Union infantry, and they gave the caval
Painesville (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 42
d Wilcox's divisions and artillery were prepared for action and awaited orders. General Meade was in front of us with the Second and Fifth Corps and Sheridan's cavalry, but his Sixth Corps was not up. General Fitzhugh Lee had been sent by the Painesville road with the balance of his cavalry to guard the trains raided by detachments of the enemy, which latter made some important captures. General Lee was with us at Jetersville, and, after careful reconnoissance, thought the enemy's position side of Flat Creek on the westward march. General Griffin, of the Fifth Corps, also had information of troops in march west, and General Meade, therefore, changed direction to pursue with his Second and Sixth Corps, putting the Fifth on the Painesville road. General Sheridan despatched General Ord that we had broken away from him and were marching direct for Burkeville. The latter prepared to receive us, but soon learned that we had taken another route. He had previously detached two regi
G. W. C. Lee (search for this): chapter 42
Corps, which wrecked the bridge behind it. G. W. C. Lee's division, including the garrison at Chapied through Chesterfield Court-House to join G. W. C. Lee's division in its after-march. General Keroyed his divisions, Kershaw's on the right, G. W. C. Lee's on the left. Their plan was, that Anderse night before, up rode Colonel Venable, of General Lee's staff, and wanted to know if he, General 's Creek, where the disaster had occurred. General Lee rode with me, Colonel Venable a little in tng herd just referred to had crowded around General Lee while he sat on his horse with a Confederatg of the affair at Sailor's Creek, nor from General Lee, until next morning. Our work at Rice's Str a little quiet to prepare breakfast, when General Lee rode up and said that the bridges had been ered under arms and put in quick march, but General Lee urged double-quick. Our cavalry was then en all. the last of our trouble for the day. General Lee stopped at a cottage near my line, where I [8 more...]
t, threatened by a small body of skirmishers, and ordered the balance of his troops deployed as skirmishers in front of the enemy's main force. I rode then to Benning's line of skirmishers, and at the middle point turned and rode at a walk to the top of the hill, took out my glasses, and had a careful view of the enemy's formidable masses. I thought I recognized General Gibbon, and raised my hat, but he was busy and did not see me. There were two forts at our line of works,--Gregg and Whitworth. General Grant rode over the captured works and ordered the forts taken. Upon withdrawing my glasses I looked to the right and left, and saw Benning's four hundred standing in even line with me, viewing the masses preparing for their march to meet us. During a few moments of quiet, General Lee despatched to Richmond of affairs at Petersburg, and to advise that our troops must abandon their lines and march in retreat as soon as night could cover the move. It was eleven o'clock of
John G. Parke (search for this): chapter 42
hers to delay under cover of an intervening swale. The alarm reached General A. P. Hill, of the Third Corps, who rode off to find his troops, but instead came suddenly upon the enemy's skirmishers in their concealment. He wheeled and made a dash to escape, but the Federal fire had deadly effect, the gallant general fell, and the Southern service lost a sword made bright by brave work upon many heavy fields. General Humphreys, of the Second, followed the move of the Sixth Corps, and General Parke assaulted on the Bermuda Hundred front and at Petersburg. He had partial success at the former, but was repulsed when he met Mahone's strong line. At Petersburg he had more success, capturing twelve guns. General Sheridan, reinforced by Miles's division, was ordered to follow up his work on the right bank. The reinforcements sent under Lieutenant-General Anderson joined General Pickett at night of the 1st, and the combined forces succeeded in getting out of the way of the Union i
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...