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T. T. Mumford (search for this): chapter 43
had not had time to enter their minds until it was announced accomplished! The reported opportunity to break through the enemy's lines proved a mistake. General Mumford, suspecting surrender from the sudden quiet of the front, made a dashing ride, and passed the enemy's lines with his division of cavalry, and that caused the p under capitulation was to deliver to the Union army some fifteen hundred prisoners, taken since we left Petersburg, not all of them by my infantry, Rosser's and Mumford's cavalry having taken more than half of them. Besides these I delivered to General Grant all of the Confederate soldiers left under my care by General Lee, exce, Rice's Station, and Cumberland Church. None were reported killed except the gallant officers Brigadier-General Dearing, of Rosser's cavalry, Colonel Bostan, of Mumford's cavalry, and Major Thompson, of Stuart's horse artillery, in the desperate and gallant fight to which they were ordered against the bridge-burning party. Ge
George A. Custer (search for this): chapter 43
ast line of battle Longstreet endeavors to recall his chief, hearing of a break where the Confederate troops could pass Custer demands surrender of Longstreet reminded of irregularity, and that he was in the enemy's lines meeting with General Grvisions for General Lee's army. He gave notice to Merritt's and Crook's cavalry, and rode twenty-eight miles in time for Custer's division to pass the station, cut off the trains, and drive back the guard advancing to protect them. He helped himselfter delivering the message, Captain Sims, through some informality, was sent to call the truce. The firing ceased. General Custer rode to Captain Sims to know his authority, and, upon finding that he was of my staff, asked to be conducted to my Headquarters, and down they came in fast gallop, General Custer's flaxen locks flowing over his shoulders, and in brusk, excited manner, he said,--In the name of General Sheridan I demand the unconditional surrender of this army. He was reminded tha
E. Porter Alexander (search for this): chapter 43
g for action against our rear-guard. The situation was embarrassing. It was plain enough that I should attack the Second Corps before others could be up and prepare for action, though our truce forbade. It could not prevail, however, to call me to quiet while the enemy in plain view was preparing for attack, so we continued at our work constructing our best line of defence, and when strong enough I ordered parts of the rear-guard forward to support the advanced forces, and directed General Alexander to establish them with part of his batteries in the best position for support or rallying line in case the front lines were forced back. That was the last line of battle formed in the Army of Northern Virginia. While this formation was proceeding, report came from our front that a break had been found through which we could force passage. I called for a swift courier, but not one could be found. Colonel J. C. Haskell had a blooded mare that had been carefully led from Petersburg
James Dearing (search for this): chapter 43
deliver to the Union army some fifteen hundred prisoners, taken since we left Petersburg, not all of them by my infantry, Rosser's and Mumford's cavalry having taken more than half of them. Besides these I delivered to General Grant all of the Confederate soldiers left under my care by General Lee, except about two hundred lost in the affairs about Petersburg, Amelia Court-House, Jetersville, Rice's Station, and Cumberland Church. None were reported killed except the gallant officers Brigadier-General Dearing, of Rosser's cavalry, Colonel Bostan, of Mumford's cavalry, and Major Thompson, of Stuart's horse artillery, in the desperate and gallant fight to which they were ordered against the bridge-burning party. General Grant's artillery prepared to fire a salute in honor of the surrender, but he ordered it stopped. As the world continues to look at and study the grand combinations and strategy of General Grant, the higher will be his award as a great soldier. Confederates sh
John B. Gordon (search for this): chapter 43
er his troopers from the rear to the advanced guard, and called General Gordon, commanding in front, for report and orders. The advance was t and prepare to defend at that point in case of close pursuit. General Gordon reported, as I remember, less than two thousand men. (General Fting a short distance in rear of our vanguard, he sent me on to General Gordon to ask him if he could break through the enemy. I found GeneraGeneral Gordon and General Fitz Lee on their front line in the dim light of the morning, arranging our attack. Gordon's reply to the message (I givGordon's reply to the message (I give the expressive phrase of the gallant Georgian) was this: Tell General Lee I have fought my corps to a frazzle, and I fear I can do nothing uGrant, and asked to have me send his message to that effect to General Gordon, and it was duly sent by Captain Sims, of the Third Corps staffnds and squads from the columns broken up at Sailor's Creek.14,833 Gordon's corps Including five thousand two hundred of fragments disperse
Halting a short distance in rear of our vanguard, he sent me on to General Gordon to ask him if he could break through the enemy. I found General Gordon and General Fitz Lee on their front line in the dim light of the morning, arranging our attack. Gordon's reply to the message (I give the expressive phrase of the gallant Georgian) was this: Tell General Lee I have fought my corps to a frazzle, and I fear I can do nothing unless I am heavily supported by Longstreet's corps. When I bore the message back to General Lee, he said, Then there is nothing left me but to go and see General Grant, and I would rather die a thousand deaths. Convulsed with passGeneral Lee, he said, Then there is nothing left me but to go and see General Grant, and I would rather die a thousand deaths. Convulsed with passionate grief, many were the wild words which we spoke as we stood around him. Said one, Oh, general, what will history say of the surrender of the army in the field? He replied, Yes, I know they will say hard things of us; they will not understand how we are overwhelmed by numbers. But that is not the question, colonel; the que
J. C. Haskell (search for this): chapter 43
tle formed in the Army of Northern Virginia. While this formation was proceeding, report came from our front that a break had been found through which we could force passage. I called for a swift courier, but not one could be found. Colonel J. C. Haskell had a blooded mare that had been carefully led from Petersburg. Appreciating the signs of the times, he had ordered her saddled, intending a desperate ride to escape impending humiliation, but, learning my need of a swift courier, he camal Lee back. He rode like the wind. General Lee had passed out and dismounted beyond a turn of the road, and was not seen until the gallant rider had dashed by him. The steed swept onward some distance before the rider could pull up. As Colonel Haskell rode back, General Lee walked to meet him, exclaiming, You have ruined your beautiful mare! why did you do so? The swift despatch was too late. General Lee's note to General Grant asking an interview had gone beyond recall. As my troo
Robert E. Lee (search for this): chapter 43
e United States, 5 P. M., April 7, 1865. General R. E. Lee, Commanding Confederate States Army: Genwill offer on condition of its surrender. R. E. Lee, General. Lieutenant-General Grant, Commandiand. During the day General Grant wrote General Lee in reply to his note of the 7th inquiring aof Robert E. Lee, A. L. Long. Presently General Lee called to have me ride forward to him. He wneral Lee back. He rode like the wind. General Lee had passed out and dismounted beyond a turnould pull up. As Colonel Haskell rode back, General Lee walked to meet him, exclaiming, You have ruu do so? The swift despatch was too late. General Lee's note to General Grant asking an interviewe would be able to march on. Soon after General Lee's return ride his chief of ordnance reporte as to the proper disposition of the funds, General Lee sent the officer to ask my opinion. As it Confederate soldiers left under my care by General Lee, except about two hundred lost in the affai[16 more...]
Wesley Merritt (search for this): chapter 43
toration of peace, I should be pleased to meet you at ten A. M. to-morrow on the old stage road to Richmond, between the picket lines of the two armies. R. E. Lee, General. The enemy's movements of the day were impressive of his desire to get by our left flank and make a strong stand across the route of our head of column. At Prospect Station, General Sheridan was informed of four trains of cars at Appomattox Station loaded with provisions for General Lee's army. He gave notice to Merritt's and Crook's cavalry, and rode twenty-eight miles in time for Custer's division to pass the station, cut off the trains, and drive back the guard advancing to protect them. He helped himself to the provisions, and captured besides twenty-five pieces of artillery and a wagon and hospital train. At night General Lee made his Headquarters near the rear-guard, and spread his couch about a hundred feet from the saddle and blanket that were my pillow and spread for the night. If he had a m
Andrew A. Humphreys (search for this): chapter 43
pondence of the 7th and 8th. So General Lee, upon mounting Traveller, his favorite horse, rode to our rear to meet him, leaving his advanced forces engaged in a lively skirmish. He did not think to send them notice of his intended ride, nor did he authorize me to call a truce. He passed my rear under flag, but General Grant's orders were that his correspondence with General Lee should not interrupt or delay the operations of any of his forces. Our advance troops were in action, and General Humphreys was up with the Second Corps of the Army of the Potomac, preparing for action against our rear-guard. The situation was embarrassing. It was plain enough that I should attack the Second Corps before others could be up and prepare for action, though our truce forbade. It could not prevail, however, to call me to quiet while the enemy in plain view was preparing for attack, so we continued at our work constructing our best line of defence, and when strong enough I ordered parts of th
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