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Hatcher's Run (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 16.107
ont of Petersburg, Ord extending to the intersection of Hatcher's Run and the Vaughan road, Humphreys stretching beyond Dabnes, which were near the crossing of the Vaughan road and Hatcher's Run. The general was becoming apprehensive lest the infantser was placed just in rear of the center as a reserve, Hatcher's Run intervening between him and our line. Everything contieft flank, swept it away, and before Rosser could cross Hatcher's Run the position at the Forks was seized and held, and an aretard such an advance. . . . I remained in position on Hatcher's Run, near Five Forks, during the night, and was joined by tMunford's division on the left, and Rosser's in rear of Hatcher's Run to guard the trains. I rode to the front in company wiheridan in person, and was ordered to strike out toward Hatcher's Run, then move west and get possession of the Ford road in his troops had just captured the enemy's works south of Hatcher's Run, and this news was added to the tidings which the gener
High Bridge (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): chapter 16.107
fought the battle of Sailor's Creek, capturing six general officers and about seven thousand men, and smashing things generally. Ord had sent Colonel Francis Washburn, of the 4th Massachusetts Cavalry, with two infantry regiments to destroy High Bridge and return to Burkeville Station, but becoming apprehensive for their safety, owing to the movements of the enemy, he sent Colonel Theodore Read of his staff with eighty cavalrymen to recall the command. Read advanced as far as Farmville, andnded, and the rest finally surrendered. Their heroic act had delayed Lee's advance long enough to be of material service in aiding his pursuers to capture a large part of his wagon trains. The next day, the 7th, Lee crossed the Appomattox at High Bridge and fired the bridge after his passage, but Humphreys arrived in time to extinguish the fire before it had made much progress, and followed Lee to the north side of the river. General Grant started from Burkeville early tile next morning, t
Deatonville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16.107
n received that he had ordered rations to meet him at Farmville, it was seen that he had abandoned all hope of reaching Burkeville and was probably heading for Lynchburg. Ord was to try to burn the High Bridge and push on to Farmville. Sheridan's cavalry was to work around on Lee's left flank, and the Army of the Potomac was to make another forced march and strike the enemy wherever it could reach him. I spent a portion of the day with Humphreys's corps, which attacked the enemy near Deatonville and gave his rear-guard no rest. I joined General Grant later and with him rode to Burkeville, getting there some time after dark. Ord had pushed out to Rice's Station, and Sheridan and Wright had gone in against the enemy and had fought the battle of Sailor's Creek, capturing six general officers and about seven thousand men, and smashing things generally. Ord had sent Colonel Francis Washburn, of the 4th Massachusetts Cavalry, with two infantry regiments to destroy High Bridge an
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 16.107
. In his Memoirs (C. L. Webster & Co.) General Sheridan says that after the troops began to move he received the following letter from General Grant, where-upon he started at once for Grant's headquarters: headquarters, armies of the United States, Gravelly Run, March 30th, 1865. Major-General Sheridan: The heavy rain of to-day will make it impossible for us to do much until it dries up a little, or we get roads around our rear repaired. You may, therefore, leave what cavalry you dr operations of the cavalry the writer of this, of his personal knowledge, knows little; but no less praise is due it than to tile infantry. In this battle more men were captured in actual conflict without negotiation than on any other field in America. pedestrians on a walking-track. As the general rode among them he was greeted with shouts and hurrahs, on all sides, and a string of sly remarks, which showed how familiar swords and bayonets become when victory furnishes the topic of their
Crump (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 16.107
rse Rienzi that had carried him from Winchester to Cedar Creek, and which Buchanan Read made famous for all time by his poem of Sheridan's ride. The roads were muddy, the fields swampy, the undergrowth dense, and Rienzi, as he plunged and curveted, dashed the foam from his mouth and the mud from his heels. Had the Winchester pike been in a similar condition, he would not have made his famous twenty miles without breaking his own neck and Sheridan's too. Mackenzie had been ordered up the Crump road with directions to turn east on the White Oak road and whip everything he met on that route. He met only a small cavalry command, and having whipped it according to orders, now came galloping back to join in the general scrimmage. He reported to Sheridan in person, and was ordered to strike out toward Hatcher's Run, then move west and get possession of the Ford road in the enemy's rear. Soon Ayres's men met with a heavy fire on their left flank and had to change direction by facing
Lynchburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16.107
ight from Amelia Court House, and from the direction he had taken, and the information received that he had ordered rations to meet him at Farmville, it was seen that he had abandoned all hope of reaching Burkeville and was probably heading for Lynchburg. Ord was to try to burn the High Bridge and push on to Farmville. Sheridan's cavalry was to work around on Lee's left flank, and the Army of the Potomac was to make another forced march and strike the enemy wherever it could reach him. I sAmerica. pedestrians on a walking-track. As the general rode among them he was greeted with shouts and hurrahs, on all sides, and a string of sly remarks, which showed how familiar swords and bayonets become when victory furnishes the topic of their talk. [For the continuation of this narrative see page 729.] Confederates destroying the Railroad from Appomattox toward Lynchburg, and artillerymen destroying gun-carriages, at nightfall, Saturday, April 8. from a sketch made at the time.
Burkeville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16.107
Army of the Potomac, while Ord was swinging along toward Burkeville to head off Lee from Danville, to which point it was natn reached Nottoway Court House, about ten miles east of Burkeville, where he halted for a couple of hours. A. young staff-nd some wagons, and had intercepted Lee's advance toward Burkeville, that Lee was in person at Amelia Court House, etc. This had reached a point about half-way between Nottoway and Burkeville. The road was skirted by a dense woods on the north sidt a message to Ord to watch the roads running south from Burkeville and Farmville, and then rode over to Meade's camp near b, it was seen that he had abandoned all hope of reaching Burkeville and was probably heading for Lynchburg. Ord was to try rest. I joined General Grant later and with him rode to Burkeville, getting there some time after dark. Ord had pushed oe north side of the river. General Grant started from Burkeville early tile next morning, the 7th, and took the direct ro
Ford, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16.107
cavalry command, and having whipped it according to orders, now came galloping back to join in the general scrimmage. He reported to Sheridan in person, and was ordered to strike out toward Hatcher's Run, then move west and get possession of the Ford road in the enemy's rear. Soon Ayres's men met with a heavy fire on their left flank and had to change direction by facing more toward the west. As the troops entered the woods and moved forward over the boggy ground and struggled through the us to see. After the capture of the angle I started off toward the right to see how matters were going there. I went in the direction of Crawford's division, passed around the left of the enemy's works, then rode due west to a point beyond the Ford road. Here I met Sheridan again, just a little before dark. He was laboring with all the energy of his nature to complete the destruction of the enemy's forces, and to make preparation to protect his own detached command from an attack by Lee in
Sailor's Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16.107
gone in against the enemy and had fought the battle of Sailor's Creek, capturing six general officers and about seven thousaral Ewell gives the following account of the battle of Sailor's Creek and the capture of his corps: On crossing a little stream known as Sailor's Creek, I met General Fitzhugh Lee, who informed me that a large force of cavalry held the road jusittle ravine which leads nearly at right angles toward Sailor's Creek. General G. W. C. Lee was on the left with the Naval Bneral J. Warren Keifer, in a pamphlet on the battle of Sailor's Creek, says: General A. P. Hill, a corps commander in Gemain body of the Confederate army had passed by toward Sailor's Creek. Pursuit with such troops as were up was promptly orderal Merritt passed east and south of the enemy across Sailor's Creek, and again attacked him on the right rear. By about 5. the Confederate army was forced across the valley of Sailor's Creek, where it took up an unusually strong position on the
Vaughan (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16.107
mounted our horses, which had been carried on the same train, started down the Vaughan road, and went into camp for the night in a field just south of that road, cloront of Petersburg, Ord extending to the intersection of Hatcher's Run and the Vaughan road, Humphreys stretching beyond Dabney's Mill, Warren on the extreme left reaching as far as the junction of the Vaughan road and the Boydton plank-road, and Sheridan at Dinwiddie Court House. The weather had become cloudy, and toward evenin with several others on the staff, I saw General Sheridan turning in from the Vaughan road with a staff-officer and an escort of about a dozen cavalry-men, and comi moved to Dabney's Mill, on a cross-road running from the Boydton plank to the Vaughan road, and about two miles from Meade's headquarters, which were near the crossing of the Vaughan road and Hatcher's Run. The general was becoming apprehensive lest the infantry force that had moved against Warren might turn upon Sheridan, who
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