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Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
Confederates west of the Alleghany Mountains). These armies threatened Northern Kentucky and protected Nashville and Middle Tennessee. At the centre of this strategic line the Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers formed the natural avenues into all thetates. These two streams approach within twelve miles of each other, at a point near the boundary between Kentucky and Tennessee. Here, at a bend in each river, the Confederates had erected two batteries, Fort Henry, on the Tennessee, and Fort Dondvance of the Union gun-boats or transports, prevented the transportation of our army by water, either into Kentucky or Tennessee. The reader may think it strange that the Confederates, with nothing like the Federal resources, should be able to tapture of Fort Henry, a victory no less brilliant in itself than glorious in its results, giving our Army a foothold in Tennessee, and opening the way for early advance to the capital of the State. Resolved, That the Governor transmit copies of t
Columbus, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
ort Henry. Shortly after the battle of Belmont the Confederates established a strong line of operations reaching to the centre of Kentucky. On their left was Columbus, where they had collected a strong force and 140 guns. One of their largest armies was at the junction of the Louisville and Nashville, and Memphis and Ohio Raiall calibres. Our Navy had already recaptured 211 of these Norfolk guns, and it remains to be seen what account it will render of those which now confront it at Columbus, Fort Henry and Fort Donelson. Grant knew the nature of these works better than any other officer, and saw that Bowling Green and Columbus could both be turneColumbus could both be turned as soon as Henry and Donelson fell. Halleck and others were making great strategic movements, which amounted to nothing, but Grant kept his mind steadily fixed on these two forts, knowing the effect their fall would have. On the 23d of January Grant visited Halleck at St. Louis, and urgently requested permission to make the
Fort Donelson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
enry by the Navy. Commanding positions of forts Henry and Donelson. Grant given permission to attempt the capture of the forts. Fooes had erected two batteries, Fort Henry, on the Tennessee, and Fort Donelson, on the Cumberland. These forts completely commanded the navignder of those which now confront it at Columbus, Fort Henry and Fort Donelson. Grant knew the nature of these works better than any other y requested permission to make the attempt to take Forts Henry and Donelson; both of which General C. F. Smith, who had made a reconnoissance,the Dover road, by which alone communication could be held with Fort Donelson. The heights on the west commanded Fort Henry, but the works ants from Danville and the mouth of Sandy River, as well as from Fort Donelson. The country around Fort Henry was all under water from the he rear of Fort Henry, and take position on the road leading to Fort Donelson and Dover. where they could intercept fugitives and hold thems
Florence, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
inst., communicating the details of your great success in the capture of Fort Henry, is just received. I had previously informed you of the reception of your telegraphic dispatch, announcing the event, which gave the highest satisfaction to the country. We have to-day the report of Lieutenant Commanding Phelps, with the gratifying results of his successful pursuit and capture and destruction of the Confederate steamers, and the disposition of the hostile camps as far up the Tennessee as Florence. I most cordially and sincerely congratulate you, and the officers and men under your command, on these heroic achievements, accomplished under extraordinary circumstances, and after surmounting great and almost insuperable difficulties. The labor you have performed, and the services you have rendered in creating the armed flotilla of gunboats on the Western waters, and in bringing together for effective operation the force which has earned such renown, can never be overestimated. The De
Cairo, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
Army contingent was greatly hampered by detailed instructions furnished by the Commander-in-Chief. Grant started from Cairo on the 2d of February, 1862, with 17,000 men in transports, and Foote accompanied him with seven gun-boats. After reconn of the 5th of February, and Grant having an insufficiency of transports was obliged to send some of his steamers back to Cairo to bring up part of his command. He did not therefore succeed in getting all his men on shore until 11 P. M. The origes in readiness to take the works by storm promptly on the receipt of orders. Commodore Foote's iron-clad gun-boats at Cairo. The fleet got under way at two o'clock on the day of the battle in the following order: The Essex, 9 guns, Corn. Wm Your ob't servant, [Signed] Gideon Welles. Flag-officer A. H. Foote, U. S. N., Commanding Gun-boat Flotilla, &c., Cairo, Ill. Official thanks to the Army and Navy. The State of Ohio deemed this battle sufficiently important to merit a vot
Tennessee River (United States) (search for this): chapter 14
of the Alleghany Mountains). These armies threatened Northern Kentucky and protected Nashville and Middle Tennessee. At the centre of this strategic line the Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers formed the natural avenues into all the disputed territory north of the cotton States. These two streams approach within twelve miles of ements from Danville and the mouth of Sandy River, as well as from Fort Donelson. The country around Fort Henry was all under water from the overflow of the Tennessee River, which impeded the movements of the troops on both sides. The rain fell in torrents on the night of the 5th of February, and Grant having an insufficiency of2, the iron-clad gun-boat Essex, whilst lying off Fort Holt, received orders from Flag-officer A. H. Foote, commanding the Western flotilla, to proceed up the Tennessee River, and anchor some five miles below Fort Henry, blockading the river at that point. The ironclads Carondelet, Commander Henry Walke; the Cincinnati, Commander
St. Louis (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
n fell. Halleck and others were making great strategic movements, which amounted to nothing, but Grant kept his mind steadily fixed on these two forts, knowing the effect their fall would have. On the 23d of January Grant visited Halleck at St. Louis, and urgently requested permission to make the attempt to take Forts Henry and Donelson; both of which General C. F. Smith, who had made a reconnoissance, reported could easily be done. The gun-boats at that time were subject to General Halle, commanding the Western flotilla, to proceed up the Tennessee River, and anchor some five miles below Fort Henry, blockading the river at that point. The ironclads Carondelet, Commander Henry Walke; the Cincinnati, Commander Stembel, and the St. Louis, Lieutenant Commanding Leonard Paulding, were completed and put into commission a few days previous, making, with the Essex, four iron-clads, besides the wooden gun-boats Taylor, Lexington and Conestoga, now ready for offensive operations. O
A. J. Sypher (search for this): chapter 14
Master; Charles S. Kendrick, Third Master; Alexander Fraser, Fourth Master; John B. McDill, Assistant Surgeon; Llewellyn Curry, Acting Paymaster; Frank A. Riley, Pilot; Robert G. Baldwin, Pilot; William Carswell, Chief Engineer; T. F. Ackerman, First Assistant Engineer; James L. Smith, Second Assistant Engineer; John Wilcoxsen, Third Assistant Engineer; Sydney H. McAdam, Master's Mate; James P. Paulding, Master's Mate; John A. McDonald, U. S. N., Acting Gunner; Robert H. Medill, Carpenter;---Sypher, Armorer. Gun-boat Carondelet. Henry Walke, U. S. N., Commander; Richard M. Wade, First Master; John Doherty, Second Master; Charles C. Gray, Third Master; Henry A. Walke, Fourth Master; William Hinton, Pilot; Daniel Weaver, Pilot; James S. McNeely, Assistant Surgeon; George J. W. Nixsin, Acting Paymaster; William H. Faulkner, Chief Engineer; Charles H. Caven, First Assistant Engineer; Samuel S. Brooks, Second Assistant Engineer; Augustus F. Crowell. Third Assistant Engineer; Theod
Henry Hamilton (search for this): chapter 14
S. L. Phelps, U. S. N., Lieutenant Commanding; John A. Duble. First Master; Charles P. Noble, Second Master; Benjamin Sebastian, Third Master; Richard H. Cutter, Fourth Master; Aaron M. Jordan. Pilot; William Attenborough, Pilot; William H. Wilson, Assistant Surgeon; Alfred Phelps, Acting Paymaster; Thomas Cook, Chief Engineer; Alexander Magee, First Assistant Engineer; Charles Marshall, Second Assistant Engineer; Michael Norton, Third Assistant Engineer; James Kearney, Master's Mate: Henry Hamilton, U. S. N., Acting Gunner; Andrew Woodlock, Carpenter; James O'Neil, Armorer. Gun-boat Essex William D. Porter, Iron-clad gun-boats St. Louis, Carondelet and Essex. U. S. N., Commander; Robert K. Riley, First Master; James Laning, Second Master; Theodore P. Ferry, Third Master; George W. Walker, Fourth Master; James McBride, Pilot; Marshall H. Ford, Pilot; Thomas Rice, Surgeon; Joseph H. Lewis, Paymaster; Charles M. Blasdell, Chief Engineer; R. J. Stearns First Assistant
Sydney H. McAdam (search for this): chapter 14
Gun-boat St. Louis. Leonard Paulding, U. S. N., Lieutenant Commanding; John V. Johnson, First Master; James Y. Clemson, Second Master; Charles S. Kendrick, Third Master; Alexander Fraser, Fourth Master; John B. McDill, Assistant Surgeon; Llewellyn Curry, Acting Paymaster; Frank A. Riley, Pilot; Robert G. Baldwin, Pilot; William Carswell, Chief Engineer; T. F. Ackerman, First Assistant Engineer; James L. Smith, Second Assistant Engineer; John Wilcoxsen, Third Assistant Engineer; Sydney H. McAdam, Master's Mate; James P. Paulding, Master's Mate; John A. McDonald, U. S. N., Acting Gunner; Robert H. Medill, Carpenter;---Sypher, Armorer. Gun-boat Carondelet. Henry Walke, U. S. N., Commander; Richard M. Wade, First Master; John Doherty, Second Master; Charles C. Gray, Third Master; Henry A. Walke, Fourth Master; William Hinton, Pilot; Daniel Weaver, Pilot; James S. McNeely, Assistant Surgeon; George J. W. Nixsin, Acting Paymaster; William H. Faulkner, Chief Engineer; Charl
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