hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) 898 0 Browse Search
N. P. Banks 776 2 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes 707 3 Browse Search
United States (United States) 694 0 Browse Search
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) 676 8 Browse Search
Alexander M. Grant 635 1 Browse Search
Fort Fisher (North Carolina, United States) 452 6 Browse Search
David D. Porter 385 63 Browse Search
Thomas W. Sherman 383 7 Browse Search
Fort Jackson (Louisiana, United States) 338 2 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. Search the whole document.

Found 360 total hits in 71 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...
Greenwood (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
manding officer Lieut.-Commander George Brown. attempt to cut a canal to Lake Providence. Yazoo Pass expedition by gunboats and transports. engagement with Fort Pemberton on the Tallahatchie River, etc. The siege of Vicksburg may be said to have commenced January 26th, 1862, on which day the Army was landed at Young's Point,ing, the Federal forces withdrew. The Navy did all that was required of it on this occasion, but there was no hearty co-operation on the part of the Army. Fort Pemberton, though well fortified and in a strong position, ought to have been taken. This would have given the Federals command of the Tallahatchie, Yallabusha and Yaz the Naval force to Lieutenant-Commander Foster, who after trying all that could be thought of, followed the Army which had been ordered to retire from before Fort Pemberton. A great deal of cotton was taken by this expedition, but the result was a failure in the main object. The enemy burned two large steamers loaded with cot
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 26
; that she had been rammed six times and being in a sinking condition had surrendered. This was a great disappointment to the admiral and General Grant, but she was blown up next night by a Yankee ruse, and the Confederates did not benefit by her capture. In justice to Lieutenant-Commander Brown, his account of this affair is inserted. It will show the kind of fighting that took place on the Mississippi, and the desperate character of the foe the Federals had to contend with. Washington, D. C., May 28, 1863. Sir — At this my earliest opportunity, I respect-fully submit to the department a report of the operations of the U. S. steamer Indianola, while below Vicksburg, Mississippi; also the particulars of the engagement with the rebel armed rams Queen of the West and William H. Webb, and armed cotton-clad steamers Dr. Batey and Grand Era, in which the Indianola was sunk and her officers and crew made prisoners. In obedience to an order from Acting-Rear-Admiral Porter, co
Fulton, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
did wonderfully well considering the difficulties. They all had to be carefully handled with hawsers around the bends, for the Yazoo Pass, following the example of the mother Mississippi, was as crooked as a ram's horn. On the second day, the vessels were so torn to pieces that no more harm could be done to them — they had hulls and engines left and that had to suffice. The officers and men performed a great deal of manual U. S. Naval hospital boat Red Rover passing Randolph near Fulton, Tenn. (from a sketch by Rear-Admiral Walke.) labor, but no one found fault, and their jolly songs echoed turough the woods as they worked, frightening the birds out of their quiet retreats, where they had rested undisturbed for a quarter of a century. The men were rewarded after four days of terrible labor by getting forty miles on their journey through such obstructions as they had never dreamed of. At last they arrived at the Tallahatchie (a clear and swift running river), and the vessels
Yazoo City (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
current drove the steamers against the trees and injured them so much that this plan had to be abandoned. Then some one proposed to cut away the levee at a place called Delta near Helena and open Yazoo Pass. This used to be the main way to Yazoo City and to the Tallahatchie and Yallabusha Rivers, before the Southern railroad was built, and it had been closed up to reclaim some millions of acres of land. It led into the Tallahatchie, and if our Navy could succeed in getting through it, a waand he conducted the operations in an intelligent manner, and though the vessels did not make very rapid headway, they did wonderfully well considering the difficulties. They all had to be carefully handled with hawsers around the bends, for the Yazoo Pass, following the example of the mother Mississippi, was as crooked as a ram's horn. On the second day, the vessels were so torn to pieces that no more harm could be done to them — they had hulls and engines left and that had to suffice. Th
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
ient in all the many appliances for undertaking a siege. They had but four siege guns, and three were supplied by the Navy. Their position opposite Vicksburg was such a poor one that a sudden rise of water would have drowned them out; and, worst of all, they had a leader in whom not an officer of the expedition could put any confidence. McClernand had come to supersede Sherman in the Yazoo River just after the troops had fallen back to the transports, and he had accompanied the Army to Arkansas Post, but with the express understanding with Admiral Porter that he would not interfere with General Sherman. This he refrained from doing until the enemy was beaten, and at that moment he assumed command and made all the reports himself. There were splendid generals in that Army, all men of the highest military acquirements, such as Sherman, McPherson, Steele and Smith, who now saw placed at their head an officer who had not only no qualifications for managing an Army of such a size,
Texas (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
that they were rendered useless. This was done in consequence of the sham monitor, sent from above, having grounded about two miles above the wreck of the Indianola. I have the honor to be, etc., George Brown, Lieut.-Commander U. S. Navy. Hon. Gideon Welles. Secretary of the Navy. Other means had now to be invented to get into the rear of the enemy or down the river in order to stop his supplies. The importance of this late move cannot be estimated. The communications between Texas and Vicksburg had been cut off, and the capture of so many steamers loaded with army stores for Port Hudson had sealed the fate of that place; they could not hold out, and Bank's Army would soon be free to march upon Vicksburg by the left shore of the river. At this time Vicksburg mounted seventy-five heavy guns, and possessed a number of heavy rifled field-pieces, which, being able to move about, were quite as annoying to vessels running the blockade. The guns at Vicksburg were so sca
Milford (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
etc. The siege of Vicksburg may be said to have commenced January 26th, 1862, on which day the Army was landed at Young's Point, seven miles above Vickburg, and at Milliken's Bend, two or three miles above Young's Point. This was rather a desYoung's Point. This was rather a desperate movement, but there was no other alternative. When Sherman first came down with the gunboats in company, he did not start out with the idea that he was to undertake a siege, but that Vicksburg was to be taken by an unexpected attack. Time w become convinced that the siege would be a long one. and made his preparations accordingly. Hearrived in person at Young's Point on the 29th of January, 1863, and assumed command of the Army on the 30th. McClernand at once protested against thiser parts. General Grant soon saw that Vicksburg could not be taken by the Army sitting down and looking at it from Young's Point. The wide and swift running Mississippi was between them. No force could land in front of the city with its long li
Alexandria (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
dredges brought down to work on it. It was hoped that when the river rose it would cut its way through, but that wished for event did not come to pass until after the fall of Vicksburg. The enemy mounted heavy guns opposite the mouth of the canal, and prevented any work upon it. General Grant now hit upon a new expedient — which was to deepen Lake Providence. This Lake communicated with the Tensas River (a deep stream), and the Tensas emptied into the Washita, and this latter into the Red River — thus forming a beautiful system of inland navigation which if properly opened and intelligently directed would have been of great service to the country bordering on the rivers mentioned. But it was not to be, the engineers were not successful. Several transports were taken in, but there were miles of forest to work through and trees to be cut down. The swift current drove the steamers against the trees and injured them so much that this plan had to be abandoned. Then some one prop
Port Hudson (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
time, and the latter had to depend upon his own resources. Vicksburg and Port Hudson were both receiving large supplies via the Red River, and the first step nec establish a blockade. This, it was thought, would hasten the evacuation of Port Hudson, and thus leave Banks at liberty to ascend the Mississippi in steamers. Oapture, and to blockade the river so closely that no provisions could get to Port Hudson or Vicksburg. Almost immediately on his arrival he captured and burned three large steamers loaded with army stores for Port Hudson. Five army officers were also captured. Ellet then proceeded ten miles up the Red River where the enemy wnd did good execution. He captured two steamers loaded with army stores for Port Hudson, and destroyed a wagon train returning from Shreveport: then the Queen of theen cut off, and the capture of so many steamers loaded with army stores for Port Hudson had sealed the fate of that place; they could not hold out, and Bank's Army
Tensas River (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
ant being anxious to get transports past Vicksburg, determined to try the ditch again, and had dredges brought down to work on it. It was hoped that when the river rose it would cut its way through, but that wished for event did not come to pass until after the fall of Vicksburg. The enemy mounted heavy guns opposite the mouth of the canal, and prevented any work upon it. General Grant now hit upon a new expedient — which was to deepen Lake Providence. This Lake communicated with the Tensas River (a deep stream), and the Tensas emptied into the Washita, and this latter into the Red River — thus forming a beautiful system of inland navigation which if properly opened and intelligently directed would have been of great service to the country bordering on the rivers mentioned. But it was not to be, the engineers were not successful. Several transports were taken in, but there were miles of forest to work through and trees to be cut down. The swift current drove the steamers agains
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...