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Resaca (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
be borne in mind that tile animus displayed towards General Polk and myself, never became apparent till after I was assigned to the command of the Army of Tennessee, and the noble Polk had been laid in his grave nigh two months. General Johnston was then residing in Macon, Georgia, where he wrote his official report, in which were brought forward, for the first time, these unjust and false accusations. If I was so little to be relied upon, and had given cause for complaint successively at Resaca and Cassville, why did he entrust to me the important operations at New Hope Church, from which it was supposed a general engagement might ensue. The truth is, he possessed no real cause of complaint, and, I reiterate, he had the full co-operation of his Lieutenants. No matter what were the views held by them touching his mode of handling an army, they were all sufficiently good soldiers to forego, in the presence of even one of their own staff officers, any remark which might tend to dest
Cassville (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
attack the left flank of the enemy. I presume he had in remembrance Lieutenant General Polk's and my urgent recommendation that he turn upon and attack Sherman at Adairsville, just before he placed his Army upon the untenable ridge in rear of Cassville, with women and children of the town between the two armies, and of which recommendation he is so careful to make no mention. When I retrace these facts and circumstances, I cannot think General Johnston in earnest when he states that he int in Macon, Georgia, where he wrote his official report, in which were brought forward, for the first time, these unjust and false accusations. If I was so little to be relied upon, and had given cause for complaint successively at Resaca and Cassville, why did he entrust to me the important operations at New Hope Church, from which it was supposed a general engagement might ensue. The truth is, he possessed no real cause of complaint, and, I reiterate, he had the full co-operation of his Li
Decatur, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
t orders to make no noise, and, under cover of darkness, marched to and across the Chattahoochee, upon the flat plains of Georgia. After our passage of this river on the night of the 9th of July, Sherman moved rapidly to the eastward and across the Chattahoochee, some distance above Peach Tree creek. He formed a line parallel to this creek, with his right on the river, and approached Atlanta from the north, whilst Schofield and McPherson, on the left, marched rapidly in the direction of Decatur to destroy the railroad to Augusta. General Johnston thus relates the sequel: Johnston's Narrative, pages 348, 349, 350. On the 17th, Major General Wheeler reported that the whole Federal Army had crossed the Chattahoochee. * * * The following telegram was received from General Cooper, dated July 17th: Lieutenant General J. B. Hood has been commissioned to the temporary rank of General, under the late law of Congress. I am directed by the Secretary of War to inform you that, a
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
l Johnston during his campaign from Dalton to Atlanta. He was on cordial terms with each of us, an, with his right on the river, and approached Atlanta from the north, whilst Schofield and McPhersot the advance of the enemy to the vicinity of Atlanta, far in the interior of Georgia, and express er, that the Federal Army was marching toward Atlanta, and, at General Hood's earnest request, I cocommand of my corps, and fight the battle for Atlanta; at the same time I directed his attention tomoval be postponed, at least till the fate of Atlanta was decided. The, following extract from aremoving Johnston, at least until the fate of Atlanta should be decided. That was the substance; Irespondence, remain in command, and fight for Atlanta, as Sherman was at the very gates of the cityances retain command and fight the battle for Atlanta, to at least remain with me and give me the by made me the promise that, after riding into Atlanta, he would return that same evening. Although[1 more...]
St. Louis (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
e city. To this appeal, he replied that the President had seen fit to relieve him, and it would have so to be, unless the order was countermanded. Lieutenant Generals Hardee and Stewart then joined me in a telegram to the President, requesting that the order for his removal be postponed, at least till the fate of Atlanta was decided. The, following extract from a letter of Lieutenant General A. P. Stewart will show that I was desirous General Johnston should remain in command: St. Louis, August 7th, 1872. General J. B. Hood. my Dear General:--Your letter of the 25th ultimo was received some days since, and I avail myself of the first opportunity to answer it. You ask me to send you a statement setting forth the facts as you (I) understand them, of the circumstances attending the removal of General J. E. Johnston from the command of our Army in Georgia, in 1864, and my appointment to succeed him. It gives me pleasure to comply with your request. * * * Monday morning,
Little Pumpkinvine creek (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
t, where it was formed on the prolongation of Polk's line. Kelly's Cavalry, composed of Allen's and Hannon's Alabama brigades, together less than a thousand (1000) men; occupied the interval, of half-a-mile, between Cleburne's right and Little Pumpkinvine creek. * * * * Between 5 and 6 o'clock in the afternoon, Kelly's skirmishers were driven in by a body of Federal cavalry, whose advance was supported by the Fourth Corps. * * * * As soon as the noise of this contest revealed to Major General Co do my whole duty; and, although I have been charged with recklessness in regard to the lives of my men, I had sufficient caution to know that some positions should not be attacked, such as the one occupied by the enemy after recrossing Little Pumpkinvine creek. However, had General Johnston given me orders to attack at all hazard, I would have done so. It is true I went into battle under protest at Gettysburg, because I desired to turn Round Top Mountain; but, notwithstanding, I was true in e
Alexander P. Stewart (search for this): chapter 7
the night. Before daybreak I started for General Johnston's headquarters, a short distance from which I met Lieutenant General A. P. Stewart, one of my division commanders, who had been recommended by me, and recently promoted to the rank of corps coval be postponed, at least till the fate of Atlanta was decided. The, following extract from a letter of Lieutenant General A. P. Stewart will show that I was desirous General Johnston should remain in command: St. Louis, August 7th, 1872. e order having been issued, it would do more harm than good to recall or suspend it. * * * Very sincerely yours, Alex. P. Stewart, Late Lieutenant General C. S. Army. The President's answer to our telegram was as follows: Richmond, July 18th, I864. to Generals Hood, Hardee and Stewart. Your telegram of this date received. A change of commanders, under existing circumstances, was regarded as so objectionable that I only accepted it as the alternative of continuing a policy wh
McPherson (search for this): chapter 7
our rear, and we folded up our tents, as usual, under strict orders to make no noise, and, under cover of darkness, marched to and across the Chattahoochee, upon the flat plains of Georgia. After our passage of this river on the night of the 9th of July, Sherman moved rapidly to the eastward and across the Chattahoochee, some distance above Peach Tree creek. He formed a line parallel to this creek, with his right on the river, and approached Atlanta from the north, whilst Schofield and McPherson, on the left, marched rapidly in the direction of Decatur to destroy the railroad to Augusta. General Johnston thus relates the sequel: Johnston's Narrative, pages 348, 349, 350. On the 17th, Major General Wheeler reported that the whole Federal Army had crossed the Chattahoochee. * * * The following telegram was received from General Cooper, dated July 17th: Lieutenant General J. B. Hood has been commissioned to the temporary rank of General, under the late law of Congress.
h in the identical position occupied by my corps. I was not only on the right, where he places Polk, but sent to him for a good division, with the message that Howard's Corps was moving rapidly to turn my right flank, which was the right of the infantry of our Army; that I had extended my lines as far as possible. He sent Clebwhen deployed into line; he was also instructed to allow the Federal cavalry to reconnoitre and find our right. Similar orders were given to our own cavalry. As Howard's Corps advanced, Cleburne was directed to deploy quickly into line; the Federals thus came in contact with a solid line of infantry, in lieu of finding the open ing them from the field, their killed and wounded being left in our hands. During this engagement, two or three hundred prisoners were captured, all belonging to Howard's Corps. At the end of this hastily written field report I add, I enclose Major General Cleburne's report, and will forward others as soon as received. Every
J. B. Hood (search for this): chapter 7
. Polk's Corps was transferred to the right of Hood's. * * * The Federal troops extended their entrarters that day (the 28th), as usual, Lieutenant General Hood suggested that we should make an attato be ready for battle next morning. Lieutenant General Hood was instructed to draw his corps out ng for the signal agreed upon — the musketry of Hood's Corps — from the appointed time until about I supposed, from the terms of this message, that Hood's Corps was in the presence of the enemy, and tIf the attack had been expedient when Lieutenant General Hood's message was dispatched, the resultiee, which you will immediately turn over to General Hood. * * * General Hood came to my quarters earGeneral Hood came to my quarters early in the morning of the i8th, and remained there during the day. Intelligence soon came from Major l Army was marching toward Atlanta, and, at General Hood's earnest request, I continued to give ordellows: Richmond, July 18th, I864. to Generals Hood, Hardee and Stewart. Your telegram of
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