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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. Search the whole document.

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Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
nia, North Carolina, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Missouri. Ex-President John Tyler, of Virginia, was caas--10. Noes-Delaware, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvanted by the following vote: Ays--Kentucky, Missouri, North Carolina, Virginia--4. Noes-Connectted by the following vote: Ays--Kentucky, Missouri, North Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia-5. No Ays--Delaware, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, New Jersey, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island Ays--Delaware, Illinois, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvanaware, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, New-Jersey, New York, New Hampshire, Ohio, P Ays--Delaware, Illinois, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, New Jersey, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island Kansas-12. Noes-Connecticut, Iowa, Maine, Missouri, North Carolina, Vermont, Virginia--7. Thllows: Ays--Delaware, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Rhode Isla[6 more...]
Slave (Canada) (search for this): chapter 25
of it. If they come to my house for it, they will not find it. I concede nothing. * * * No matter what may be said at the Syracuse Convention, or any other assemblage of insane persons. I never would consent that there should be one foot of Slave Territory beyond what the old Thirteen States had at the time of the formation of the Union. Never, never The man can't show his face to me, and prove that I ever departed from that doctrine. He would sneak away, or slink away, or hire a mercenary Hly offered, See page 381. in the Senate, to unite in the immediate admission of New Mexico (which then included Arizona) as a State, under such Constitution as her people should see fit to frame and adopt-New Mexico being at that moment a Slave Territory by act of her Legislature — to say nothing of the Dred Scott decision. That would have given the South a firm hold on nearly every acre of our present territory whereon she could rationally hope ever to plant Slavery--provided the people of
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 25
ntion at Albany, 1861 Seymour, Thayer, etc. peace Conterence or Congress at Washington modified Crittenden Compromise adopted thereby Congress non-concurs failur the request of the Legislature of Virginia for a meeting of Commissioners at Washington, and asks the Legislature of New York to appoint Commissioners thereto; and, Roscoe Conkling attests that, when the proceedings of this Convention reached Washington, they were hailed with undisguised exultation by the Secessionists still lingsition in the free States to adjust the controversy. We have just heard from Washington that the Republicans have presented their ultimatum; and I say to you, in sinto conciliate, and stigmatized as repelling. and convened February 4th. in Washington one month prior to Mr. Lincoln's inauguration. Thirteen Free States were rep to the Congress of the United States that their body convened in the city of Washington on the 4th instant, and continued in session until the 27th. There were in
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 25
olds nationalities. But the Republicans complain that, having won a victory, we ask them to surrender its fruits. We do not wish them to give up any political advantage. We urge measures which are demanded by the honor and the safety of our Union. Can it be that they are less concerned than we are? Will they admit that they have interests antagonistic to those of the whole commonwealth? Are they making sacrifices, when they do that which is required by the common welfare? Had New England and some other of the Fremont States revolted, or threatened to revolt, after the election of 1856, proclaiming that they would never recognize nor obey Mr. Buchanan as President, unless ample guarantees were accorded them that Kansas should thenceforth be regarded and treated as a Free Territory or State, would any prominent Democrat have thus insisted that this demand should be complied with Would he have urged that the question of Freedom or Slavery in Kansas should be submitted to a d
Cuba (Cuba) (search for this): chapter 25
— the broad and solid base of our industrial economy and commercial prosperity — the slaves confined, indeed, to one section of the Union, because there most profitably employed, but laboring for the benefit of Northern See Judge Woodward's speech, page 364. manufacturers and merchants as much as for that of Southern planters and factors — that we must all watch and work to give that interest wider scope by the conquest of more territory, and by the maintenance at all hazards of Slavery in Cuba, etc.--and that all anti-Slavery discussion or expostulation must be systematically suppressed, as sedition, if not treason — such was the gist of the Southern requirement. A long-haired, raving Abolitionist in the furthest North, according to conservative ideas, not merely disturbed the equilibrium of Southern society, but undermined the fabric of our National prosperity. He must be squelched, See Mayor Henry's speech; also his letter forbidding G. W. Curtis's lecture, pages 363-7. or
Maine (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
the South can or ought to take — then, here in Maine, not a Democrat will be found who will raise aNoes-Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Indiana, Maine, Massachusetts, Maryland, New Jersey, New Yorkoes--Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Indiana, Maine, Massachusetts, Maryland, New Jersey, New Yorkinia-11. Noes--Connecticut, Illinois, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, North Carolina, New Hampshire,ennessee, Vermont, Virginia-15. Noes--Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, New-Hampshire--4. Mr. Guth, Tennessee, Vermont, Kansas-16. Noes-Iowa, Maine,Massachusetts, North Carolina, Virginia--5. ansas-11. Noes--Connecticut, Indiana, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, North Carolina, New Hampshire,nnessee, Kansas-12. Noes-Connecticut, Iowa, Maine, Missouri, North Carolina, Vermont, Virginia-- Noes-Connecticut, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania--7. Mr. J. A.missioners, representing the following States: Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode [8 more...]
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 25
the nullification of all the rights of the United States, and the execution of the laws! A threat rve the dignity of the government of these United States as well. [Applause.] Mr. Elseffer's a submitted an Address to the People of the United States, deploring the divisions and distractions m each other portions of the people of the United States to such an extent as seriously to disturb on 1. In all the present territory of the United States, north of the parallel of thirty-six degre 2. No territory shall be acquired by the United States, except by discovery, and for naval and coes under the exclusive jurisdiction of the United States within those States and Territories where persons held to service or labor, into the United States and the Territories from places beyond the7. Congress shall provide by law that the United States shall pay to the owner the full value of h their allegiance to the Government of the United States. Mr. Barringer, of North Carolina, mov[7 more...]
Albion (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
Democratic candidates for Governor; one of them once elected, and since chosen again. Though called as Democratic, there was a large and most respectable representation of the old Whig party, with a number who had figured as Americans. No Convention which had nominations to make, or patronage to dispose of, was ever so influentially constituted. All sympathizing State officers and members of the Legislature were formally invited to participate in its deliberations. Sanford E. Church, of Albion, was temporary Chairman, and Judge Amasa J. Parker, of Albany, President. On taking the Chair, Judge Parker said: This Convention has been called with no view to mere party objects. It looks only to the great interests of State. We meet here as conservative and representative men who have differed among themselves as to measures of governmental policy, ready, all of them, I trust, to sacrifice such differences upon the altar of our common country. He can be no true patriot who is not
Northampton (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
d together only by public opinion. Each State is organized as a complete government, holding the purse and wielding the sword, possessing the right to break the tie of the confederation as a nation might break a treaty, and repel coercion as a nation might repel invasion. * * * Coercion, if it were possible, is out of the question. The Charleston Courier of November, 1860, announced the formation of Military organizations in various parts of the North in defense of Southern rights. Allentown, Pa., was specified as one of the points at which such forces were mustering and drilling. The Peace Conference, or Congress, so called, was assembled on the unanimous invitation of the Legislature of Virginia, Adopted January 19, 1861. So early as Nov. 30, 1860, Gov. John Letcher, of Virginia, who, as a Douglas Democrat and former anti-Slavery man, was regarded as among the most moderate of Southern politicians, in answer to a Union letter from Rev. Lewis P. Clover, a Democrat of
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
ed by the conservative States of Virginia and Kentucky that, if force is to be used, it must be exerDelaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Missouri. Ex-President John Tshire, Vermont, Kansas--10. Noes-Delaware, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, New Jersey, North Caroli And whereas, the Legislature of the State of Kentucky has made application to Congress to call a Corecommend to the several States to unite with Kentucky in her application to Congress to call a Convys--Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, New-Jersey, North Caroliys--Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, New-Jersey, New York, Ne and not voting: Ays--Delaware, Illinois, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, New Jersey, Ohio, Pennsy Whereas, the Legislatures of the States of Kentucky, New Jersey, and Illinois, have applied to Coy the aid of all the Slave States represented-Kentucky among them. II. The Republicans likewise [16 more...]
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