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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. Search the whole document.

Found 414 total hits in 95 results.

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Fort Taylor (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
rdinance of Secession surrender of the regulars their loyalty and sufferings New Mexico repeals act legalizing Slavery Canby in command prepares to hold New Mexico Sibley brigade Fort Craig Sibley declines to attack battle of Valverde heroism and death of McRae fight at Apache Pass Rebels occupy Santa Fe they abandon New Mexico. The frontiers of Texas, Mexican and savage, were guarded, prior to the outbreak of Secession, by a line of forts or military posts stretching from Brownsville, opposite Matamoras, to the Red River. These forts were located at average distances of one hundred miles, and were severally held by detachments of from 50 to 150 of the regular army. San Antonio, 150 miles inland from Indianola, on Matagorda Bay, was the headquarters of the department, whence the most remote post--Fort Bliss, on the usual route thence to New Mexico--was distant 675 miles. The whole number of regulars distributed throughout Texas was 2,612, comprising nearly half the e
Fort Bliss (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
o 150 of the regular army. San Antonio, 150 miles inland from Indianola, on Matagorda Bay, was the headquarters of the department, whence the most remote post--Fort Bliss, on the usual route thence to New Mexico--was distant 675 miles. The whole number of regulars distributed throughout Texas was 2,612, comprising nearly half the far down as Fort Staunton, leaving Fort Fillmore still in the hands of the Texans. Gen. Sibley, who had hoped to advance in the Autumn of 1861, was still at Fort Bliss, within the limits of Texas, on the 1st of January, 1862; but moved forward, a few days thereafter, with 2,300 men, many of them trained to efficiency in the Me that his soldiers would decidedly object to returning to that inhospitable, undesirable country. These and kindred considerations had induced his return to Fort Bliss, Texas, and now impelled him to meditate a movement without orders still further down the country. Col. Canby wisely declined to run a race of starvation across
Valverde, N. M. (New Mexico, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ength, but entirely destitute of water, losing 100 of the mules of his baggage-train during the night, by their breaking away, in the frenzy of their thirst, from the weary and sleepy guards appointed to herd them. He was thus compelled to abandon a part of his wagons and baggage next morning, as he started for the river, the smallness of his force not permitting him to divide it in the presence of a capable and vigilant enemy. When his advance, 250 strong, under Maj. Pyron, reached, at Valverde, a point, at 8 A. M., where the river bottom was accessible, fully seven miles from the fort, they found themselves confronted by a portion of our regular cavalry, Lt.-Col. Roberts, with two most efficient batteries, Capt. McRae and Lt. Hall, supported by a large force of regular and volunteer infantry. Our batteries opening upon him, Pyron, greatly outnumbered, recoiled, with some loss, and our troops exultingly crossed the river to the cast bank, where a thick wood covered a concentratio
Indianola (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
iles, and were severally held by detachments of from 50 to 150 of the regular army. San Antonio, 150 miles inland from Indianola, on Matagorda Bay, was the headquarters of the department, whence the most remote post--Fort Bliss, on the usual route can be called — was imposed upon and readily accepted by him. Within 90 days after his arrival December 5, 1860. at Indianola, he had surrendered February 18, 1861. He immediately and openly declared that the Union could not last 60 days, any were included in its terms. Collecting and dispatching his men as rapidly as he might, he had some 1,200 encamped at Indianola ready for embarkation, when they were visited by Col. E. Van Dorn, of the Confederate service, recently a captain in oue cajoled or bribed into deserting the flag of their country. Col. Waite was still at San Antonio, when news reached Indianola April 17, 1861. of the reduction April 13. of Fort Sumter; and Col. Van Dorn, with three armed steamers from Galv
New Jersey (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
I. Texas and New Mexico. Twiggs's treason Texas State Convention passes ordinance of Se the regulars their loyalty and sufferings New Mexico repeals act legalizing Slavery Canby in come Pass Rebels occupy Santa Fe they abandon New Mexico. The frontiers of Texas, Mexican and savast--Fort Bliss, on the usual route thence to New Mexico--was distant 675 miles. The whole number of nfederate service. Of the 1,200 regulars in New Mexico, one only deserted during this time of trial the entire act, leaving the statute-book of New Mexico clean of all complicity with the chattelizinSibley brigade, designed for the conquest of New Mexico. His funds were scanty, and the credit of homfortable subsistence were not to be had in New Mexico, nor nearer than Missouri, then a revolutionre completely the impossibility of attaching New Mexico to the Confederacy, or even of remaining in ical geographical position, the Territory of New Mexico is not worth a quarter of the blood expended[2 more...]
Mexico (Mexico) (search for this): chapter 1
nby in command prepares to hold New Mexico Sibley brigade Fort Craig Sibley declines to attack battle of Valverde heroism and death of McRae fight at Apache Pass Rebels occupy Santa Fe they abandon New Mexico. The frontiers of Texas, Mexican and savage, were guarded, prior to the outbreak of Secession, by a line of forts or military posts stretching from Brownsville, opposite Matamoras, to the Red River. These forts were located at average distances of one hundred miles, and were sd by court-martial to be reprimanded in general orders, and suspended from duty for six months! New Mexico, thus shamefully bereft, at a blow, of half her defenders, was now reckoned an easy prey to the gathering forces of the Rebellion. Her Mexican population, ignorant, timid, and superstitious, had been attached to the Union by conquest, scarcely fifteen years before, and had, meantime, been mainly under the training of Democratic officials of strong pro-Slavery sympathies, who had induce
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 1
and rigorous, was promptly responded to by an almost unanimous repeal of the entire act, leaving the statute-book of New Mexico clean of all complicity with the chattelizing of man. Meantime, Col. Canby was quietly proceeding with the organization of his militia and other forces for the inevitable contest, crippled throughout by the want of money, munitions, and supplies of all kinds. Even directions and orders, so plentifully bestowed on most subordinates, were not vouchsafed him from Washington, where the absorption of all energies in the more immediate and momentous struggle on the Potomac and the Missouri, denied him even an answer to his frequent and importunate requisitions and representations. An urgent appeal, however, to the Governor of the adjacent Territory of Colorado, had procured him thence a regiment of volunteers, who, though falling far enough short of the efficiency of trained soldiers, were worth five to ten times their number of his New Mexican levies. Making
Matagorda Bay (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ism and death of McRae fight at Apache Pass Rebels occupy Santa Fe they abandon New Mexico. The frontiers of Texas, Mexican and savage, were guarded, prior to the outbreak of Secession, by a line of forts or military posts stretching from Brownsville, opposite Matamoras, to the Red River. These forts were located at average distances of one hundred miles, and were severally held by detachments of from 50 to 150 of the regular army. San Antonio, 150 miles inland from Indianola, on Matagorda Bay, was the headquarters of the department, whence the most remote post--Fort Bliss, on the usual route thence to New Mexico--was distant 675 miles. The whole number of regulars distributed throughout Texas was 2,612, comprising nearly half the effective force of our little army. When, soon after Mr. Lincoln's election, but months prior to his inauguration, Gen. David E. Twiggs was dispatched by Secretary Floyd from New Orleans to San Antonio, and assigned to the command of the departmen
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
e in the qualities of his men, in organizing and arming, in north-western Texas, the Sibley brigade, designed for the conquest of New Mexico. His funds were scanty, and the credit of his Government quite as low as that depended on by Canby; but the settled, productive districts of Texas were not very remote nor inaccessible, while Canby's soldiers were for weeks on short allowance, simply because provisions for their comfortable subsistence were not to be had in New Mexico, nor nearer than Missouri, then a revolutionary volcano, where production had nearly ceased. Two insignificant collisions had taken place near Fort Craig. In October, 1861. In the earlier, a company of New Mexican volunteers, Capt. Mink, were routed and pursued by a party of Texans, who, in their turn, were beaten and chased away, with considerable loss, by about 100 regulars from the fort. The surviving Texans escaped to Mesilla; and Canby occupied the frontier posts so far down as Fort Staunton, leaving Fort
Albuquerque (New Mexico, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
t found opportunity to give notice to Capt. Hatch, commanding at Albuquerque, to Capt. Morris, who held Fort Craig, and other loyal officers,n their good-will. Their sufferings, on that forlorn march to Albuquerque and Fort Wise, wee protracted and terrible; some becoming derang their wounded at Socorro, 30 miles on the way, they advanced to Albuquerque, 50 miles further, which fell without resistance, and where theievacuate his hard-won conquest, and retreat by forced marches to Albuquerque, his depot, which Canby, advancing from Fort Craig, was seriouslmeet him, leaving his sick and wounded in hospitals at Santa Fe, Albuquerque, and Socorro, to fare as they might. He naively reports that suManuel Armijo--wealthy native merchants — who, on his arrival at Albuquerque, had boldly avowed their sympathy with the Confederate cause, anrth of goods at his disposal. He states that, when he evacuated Albuquerque, they abandoned luxurious homes to identify their fixture fortun
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