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Bacon Creek, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 47
opes of loyal men in the South, and damaging the rebel cause in the eyes of the nations of Europe, will be incalculable. I, for one am proud to be, even in an humble capacity, a member of that division of the army which first occupied the Western Manassas of the enemy, Bowling Green. Y. S. Providence journal account. Bowling Green, February 16. The last few days have been days of excitement and trial. Last Tuesday, February 11th, Gen. Mitchell's division left their camp at Bacon Creek, Kentucky, and marched to their camp called Camp Madison, one mile beyond Green River. The business of this division is transacted very secretly, and consequently thoroughly. We did not receive orders to start until until about nine o'clock the preceding evening, and being required to strike tents at five, we had a busy night. The roads were in splendid order, except near the creek and Green River, where they were very bad. Though we marched but ten miles, we were all tired enough when
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 47
Doc. 45.-occupation of Bowling Green, Ky. Gen. Buell's despatch. Louisville, February 15, 1862. To Major General-Mh, and by your enemy proudly denominated the Gibraltar of Kentucky. With your own hands, through deep mud, in drenching rnding. Cincinnati Gazette narrative. Bowling Green, Ky., February 15. Our victory is completed! We are now in po strikingly illustrated the proclamation to the people of Kentucky, which that arch — scoundrel, Simon Bolivar Buckner, issued last September: I return amongst you, citizens of Kentucky, at the head of a force the advance of which is composed entirad such terror amongst the loyal, peaceable people of Southern Kentucky, but notwithstanding their braggadocio, swell, and swy almost equivalent to the expulsion of the traitors from Kentucky, and its moral effect in discouraging them, raising the h Gen. Mitchell's division left their camp at Bacon Creek, Kentucky, and marched to their camp called Camp Madison, one mile
Mihialotzs (search for this): chapter 47
feel precisely as does your Commanding General, that nothing is done, while anything remains to be done. By order of Brig.-Gen. O. M. Mitchell, Commanding. Cincinnati Gazette narrative. Bowling Green, Ky., February 15. Our victory is completed! We are now in possession of Bowling Green. Last night, at about nine o'clock, Col. Turchin's brigade, consisting of the Eighteenth Ohio, Col. Stanley, the Thirty-seventh Indiana, Major Hall Commanding, the Twenty fourth Illinois, Col. Mihialotzs, the Nineteenth Illinois, Col. Turchin, together with sections of Loomis's, Edgarton's and Simonson's batteries, and three companies of Col. Kennett's cavalry, were formed in order, and marched rapidly to a ferry, a mile and a half below the town. A single boat was there, a kind of flat-boat, upon which about fifty infantry or a score of cavalry could pass at once. The river is about a hundred yards wide at this place, and the descent to the water on one side, and the ascent from it o
O. M. Mitchell (search for this): chapter 47
s despatch. Louisville, February 15, 1862. To Major General-McClellan: Mitchell's division, by a forced march, reached the river at Bowling Green to-day, maki The following is a general order, issued by Gen. Buell to the troops of General Mitchell's division, after their advance upon Bowling Green: General order at nothing is done, while anything remains to be done. By order of Brig.-Gen. O. M. Mitchell, Commanding. Cincinnati Gazette narrative. Bowling Green, Kye value of the rebel property destroyed at Bowling Green, in consequence of Gen. Mitchell's brilliant dash, has been variously estimated. When I put it at a half-mizen of the thieving rascals were made to bite the dust. But the value of Gen. Mitchell's conquest is not to be estimated either by the number of the enemy killed days have been days of excitement and trial. Last Tuesday, February 11th, Gen. Mitchell's division left their camp at Bacon Creek, Kentucky, and marched to their c
D. C. Buell (search for this): chapter 47
Doc. 45.-occupation of Bowling Green, Ky. Gen. Buell's despatch. Louisville, February 15, 1862. To Major General-McClellan: Mitchell's division, by a forced march, reached the river at Brned the bridge at one o'clock in the morning, and were evacuating the place when he arrived. D. C. Buell, Brigadier-General Commanding. Gen. Buell's General order. The following is a general Gen. Buell's General order. The following is a general order, issued by Gen. Buell to the troops of General Mitchell's division, after their advance upon Bowling Green: General order no. 70. headquarters Third division, Camp John Q. Adams, BowlingGen. Buell to the troops of General Mitchell's division, after their advance upon Bowling Green: General order no. 70. headquarters Third division, Camp John Q. Adams, Bowling Green, February 19, 1862. soldiers of the Third division: You have executed a march of forty miles in twenty-eight hours and a half. The fallen timber and other obstructions, opposed by the enemy n a degree which leaves no limit to my confidence in their future movements. By order of Brig.-Gen. Buell, Commanding Department of the Ohio. Soldiers! I feel a perfect confidence that the high
is completed! We are now in possession of Bowling Green. Last night, at about nine o'clock, Col. Turchin's brigade, consisting of the Eighteenth Ohio, Col. Stanley, the Thirty-seventh Indiana, Major Hall Commanding, the Twenty fourth Illinois, Col. Mihialotzs, the Nineteenth Illinois, Col. Turchin, together with sections of Loomis's, Edgarton's and Simonson's batteries, and three companies of Cod in time, and orders were issued for all the other regiments to cross at the same place with Col. Turchin's brigade. Owing to the failure of this order to reach the headquarters of Gen. Dumont, undelroad bridge was destroyed, and that the confederates would now stand this side of the river, Col. Turchin ordered the cavalry and one battery ahead. The ranks opened to the right and left, and Capt.s' knapsacks drawn by horses the rest of the way, much to the relief of our tired shoulders. Gen. Turchin fired the first shell into the town, and immediately three regiments were seen scampering on
James F. Hall (search for this): chapter 47
and of our Government and our country. I trust you feel precisely as does your Commanding General, that nothing is done, while anything remains to be done. By order of Brig.-Gen. O. M. Mitchell, Commanding. Cincinnati Gazette narrative. Bowling Green, Ky., February 15. Our victory is completed! We are now in possession of Bowling Green. Last night, at about nine o'clock, Col. Turchin's brigade, consisting of the Eighteenth Ohio, Col. Stanley, the Thirty-seventh Indiana, Major Hall Commanding, the Twenty fourth Illinois, Col. Mihialotzs, the Nineteenth Illinois, Col. Turchin, together with sections of Loomis's, Edgarton's and Simonson's batteries, and three companies of Col. Kennett's cavalry, were formed in order, and marched rapidly to a ferry, a mile and a half below the town. A single boat was there, a kind of flat-boat, upon which about fifty infantry or a score of cavalry could pass at once. The river is about a hundred yards wide at this place, and the desce
Oscar M. Loomis (search for this): chapter 47
Commanding, the Twenty fourth Illinois, Col. Mihialotzs, the Nineteenth Illinois, Col. Turchin, together with sections of Loomis's, Edgarton's and Simonson's batteries, and three companies of Col. Kennett's cavalry, were formed in order, and marched s had gone away — the secessionists from the fear of the Union army, the Union people because they were frightened by Captain Loomis's shells. Those who remained, whether rebel or loyal, did the best, for neither class were molested, nor were their d men slain in battle. The retreat of the enemy's cavalry was not accomplished without some loss. A shell or two from Loomis's unerring ten-pounder Parrotts, burst among them before they got entirely out of range, killing and wounding at least a ide of the river, Col. Turchin ordered the cavalry and one battery ahead. The ranks opened to the right and left, and Capt. Loomis's battery dashed by in fine style, and reached Bowling Green about ten o'clock. We heard the cannon roar, and then we
Simon Bolivar Buckner (search for this): chapter 47
ave shared the same fate had not the vandals been suddenly and unexpectedly driven from their prey. It is hardly necessary to say that both the Judge and his brother have been unflinching Union men all their lives, and that neither the seductions of treason, nor the threats of traitors could shake their steadfast loyalty. Their devotion has cost them much, and what they have suffered has strikingly illustrated the proclamation to the people of Kentucky, which that arch — scoundrel, Simon Bolivar Buckner, issued last September: I return amongst you, citizens of Kentucky, at the head of a force the advance of which is composed entirely of Kentuckians. We do not come to molest any citizen, whatever may be his political opinions. Falsehood seems to be a constituent element of the rebellion, as much as plunder and outrage. The value of the rebel property destroyed at Bowling Green, in consequence of Gen. Mitchell's brilliant dash, has been variously estimated. When I put it at a ha
W. J. Hardee (search for this): chapter 47
provisions for a week. Still, immense quantities were destroyed — boxes of guns, large numbers of Bowie-knives roughly fashioned of iron, and every conceivable kind of shooting apparatus, and all sorts of hardware for cooking and other uses, in immense quantities. I learn that we were not expected for a week, and we took them by surprise. Our artillery made such quick time, that they received their first news of our approach in the shape of a cannonball, which struck the building in which Hardee was, and caused him to make double-quick time out of town. We anticipated, for the first twenty-four hours, an attack from the confederate forces, as we had but only four regiments and some cavalry; but we have the town safe and fast now. The citizens seem to be out of heart, and do nothing. No alarm was given at a fire last night, arid you would not have known, in the back part of the town, that there was any fire. Bowling Green had a population of about two thousand five hundred. Th
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