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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). Search the whole document.

Found 157 total hits in 74 results.

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Salisbury, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.5
Artillery; C. Rossiter, First W. Artillery, and S. M. E. Clark, First W. Artillery (abbreviation for Washington Artillery). hard the stories of the attitude of some of the prisoners toward their companions are revolting. In Andersonville and Salisbury, organized bands preyed upon the weak or upon those who had managed to retain, or to obtain, some desired necessity or luxury. The possession of a little money, a camp-kettle, a blanket, or an overcoat was sometimes the occasion for jealousy aor by the few cents Hunting roots for firewood—Andersonville prisoners in 1864 In this photograph of Andersonville Prison, the prisoners are searching along the bank of the sluggish stream for roots with which to boil coffee. Here, as at Salisbury and other prisons, organized bands preyed upon the weak and wealthy. Wealth in this connection implies the possession of a little money, a camp kettle, a blanket, or an overcoat, which led to displays of extreme cupidity. The plutocrat owning
Port Warren (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.5
The life of the captured Holland Thompson Confederates in a Northern keep. Port Warren. 1864 Nine of the prisoners in this photograph were officers of the Confederate States ironclad Atlanta, captured at Savannah, June 17, 1863: (1) Master T. L. Wragg, (3) Gunner T. B. Travers, (4) First Assistant Engineer Morrill, (5) Second Assistant Engineer L. G. King, (6) Master Mate J. B. Beville, (7) Pilot Hernandez, (8) Midshipman Peters, (12) Third Assistant Engineer J. S. West, (13) Master Alldridge. The others were: (2) Lieutenant Moses, C. S. A., (9) Captain Underwood, C. S. A., (10) Major Boland, C. S. A., (11) Second Assistant E. H. Browne, (14) Master Mate John Billups of the privateer Tacony, and (15) Captain Sanders, C. S. A. To go into a prison of war is in all respects to be born over. And so in this far little world, which was as much separated from the outer world as if it had been in the outer confines of space, it was striking to see how society immediately r
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.5
the United States, can be picked out from the complete roster from left to right as it was written on the photograph: J. F. Stone, First Maryland Cavalry; H. C. Florance, First W. Artillery; D. Kilpatrick, First W. Artillery; William Byrne, Cit. Maryland; D. W. Slye, Cit. Maryland; Van Vinson, First W. Artillery; J. Black, Louisiana Guard; F. F. Case, First W. Artillery; G. W. Dupre, First W. Artillery; C. E. Inloes, First Maryland Cavalry; Edwin Harris, Company H., Seventh Louisiana; W. D. DuBaMaryland; Van Vinson, First W. Artillery; J. Black, Louisiana Guard; F. F. Case, First W. Artillery; G. W. Dupre, First W. Artillery; C. E. Inloes, First Maryland Cavalry; Edwin Harris, Company H., Seventh Louisiana; W. D. DuBarry, Twenty-seventh South Carolina; H. L. Allan, First W. Artillery; G. R. Cooke, First Maryland Cavalry; J. Bozant, First W. Artillery; C. Rossiter, First W. Artillery, and S. M. E. Clark, First W. Artillery (abbreviation for Washington Artillery). hard the stories of the attitude of some of the prisoners toward their companions are revolting. In Andersonville and Salisbury, organized bands preyed upon the weak or upon those who had managed to retain, or to obtain, some desired necessity or l
Newtown (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.5
tunneling, an occupation which served to pass the time even when it was discovered by the guards, which was true of the majority of such attempts to escape. The great difficulty in all prisons was the necessity of getting through the twenty-four hours without yielding to fatal despair. in money allowed them as compensation. Thus, additional barracks were constructed in some Northern prisons largely by prison labor, and the ditch through which fresh water was led into the stagnant pond at Elmira, was dug by the prisoners. The Confederacy attempted to establish shoe and harness shops at Andersonville, Millen, and perhaps other places, to utilize the skill of the mechanics in prison and the hides of the slaughtered cattle which were going to waste. Assignments to the burial squad at all these Southern prisons were eagerly sought, and men also were glad to be detailed to the wood-squad, which brought in fuel, thinking themselves well repaid by the opportunity of getting outside the
Belle Isle, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.5
escott, N. C. Trobridge, Major S. Cabot, and R. D. Crittenden. vigilance of the prison guard. Some prisoners were often cold and hungry because of their flirtation with the goddess of chance. To many of the prisoners with a limited outlook on life, some excitement was a necessary stimulus, and this was most easily obtained by a game of chance or, if facilities for a game were lacking, by making wagers upon every conceivable event. At times even some of the poorly clothed prisoners on Belle Isle and in Andersonville and Florence gambled away the clothing and blankets sent by the Sanitary Commission or by the Federal Government. Others, North and South, would wager their rations and then go hungry for days, if chance proved unkind, unless some good Samaritan took pity and stinted himself that the hungry might be fed. There was little indulgence in athletic sports even where the physical condition of the prisoners would have allowed such exertion. Generally, the prisons North a
Florence, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.5
abot, and R. D. Crittenden. vigilance of the prison guard. Some prisoners were often cold and hungry because of their flirtation with the goddess of chance. To many of the prisoners with a limited outlook on life, some excitement was a necessary stimulus, and this was most easily obtained by a game of chance or, if facilities for a game were lacking, by making wagers upon every conceivable event. At times even some of the poorly clothed prisoners on Belle Isle and in Andersonville and Florence gambled away the clothing and blankets sent by the Sanitary Commission or by the Federal Government. Others, North and South, would wager their rations and then go hungry for days, if chance proved unkind, unless some good Samaritan took pity and stinted himself that the hungry might be fed. There was little indulgence in athletic sports even where the physical condition of the prisoners would have allowed such exertion. Generally, the prisons North and South were too crowded to afford
T. L. Wragg (search for this): chapter 1.5
The life of the captured Holland Thompson Confederates in a Northern keep. Port Warren. 1864 Nine of the prisoners in this photograph were officers of the Confederate States ironclad Atlanta, captured at Savannah, June 17, 1863: (1) Master T. L. Wragg, (3) Gunner T. B. Travers, (4) First Assistant Engineer Morrill, (5) Second Assistant Engineer L. G. King, (6) Master Mate J. B. Beville, (7) Pilot Hernandez, (8) Midshipman Peters, (12) Third Assistant Engineer J. S. West, (13) Master Alldridge. The others were: (2) Lieutenant Moses, C. S. A., (9) Captain Underwood, C. S. A., (10) Major Boland, C. S. A., (11) Second Assistant E. H. Browne, (14) Master Mate John Billups of the privateer Tacony, and (15) Captain Sanders, C. S. A. To go into a prison of war is in all respects to be born over. And so in this far little world, which was as much separated from the outer world as if it had been in the outer confines of space, it was striking to see how society immediately re
mpson Confederates in a Northern keep. Port Warren. 1864 Nine of the prisoners in this photograph were officers of the Confederate States ironclad Atlanta, captured at Savannah, June 17, 1863: (1) Master T. L. Wragg, (3) Gunner T. B. Travers, (4) First Assistant Engineer Morrill, (5) Second Assistant Engineer L. G. King, (6) Master Mate J. B. Beville, (7) Pilot Hernandez, (8) Midshipman Peters, (12) Third Assistant Engineer J. S. West, (13) Master Alldridge. The others were: (2) Lieutenant Moses, C. S. A., (9) Captain Underwood, C. S. A., (10) Major Boland, C. S. A., (11) Second Assistant E. H. Browne, (14) Master Mate John Billups of the privateer Tacony, and (15) Captain Sanders, C. S. A. To go into a prison of war is in all respects to be born over. And so in this far little world, which was as much separated from the outer world as if it had been in the outer confines of space, it was striking to see how society immediately resolved itself into those three estates i
F. U. Benneau (search for this): chapter 1.5
here somewhat uncongenial, but his companions are evidently at ease. Not every man is a Mark Tapley who can keep cheerful under creditable circumstances. But where the prisoners were men of some mentality they adopted many plans to mitigate the monotony. The Confederate officers at Johnson's Island had debating societies, classes in French, dancing, and music, and a miniature government. From left to right the men standing, exclusive of the two corporals on guard, are C. W. Ringgold, F. U. Benneau, S. DeForrest, J. T. Hespin, J. P. Hambleton, and M. A. Hardin; and the four men seated are J. E. Frescott, N. C. Trobridge, Major S. Cabot, and R. D. Crittenden. vigilance of the prison guard. Some prisoners were often cold and hungry because of their flirtation with the goddess of chance. To many of the prisoners with a limited outlook on life, some excitement was a necessary stimulus, and this was most easily obtained by a game of chance or, if facilities for a game were lacking, b
R. H. Gayle (search for this): chapter 1.5
ured before they had become seasoned by life in the camps. Some relapsed almost at once into helpless and hopeless apathy, caring for nothing, thinking of nothing except the homes and friends they had left. Huddled in corners they sat for hours Confederate prisoners of war in the North. Books and reading matter were evidently available to these Confederates in Fort Warren, 1864. The men in this photograph are C. T. Jenkins, seated on the left; W. W. Helm, standing behind him; R. H. Gayle, in the center with the pipe, and I. Kensfick, seated, with a paper in his hand. Behind him stands Orderly Carey. The only signs of prison are the massive walls and the sergeant on guard with his gun. Many Confederate civilians as well as prominent officers were confined in this stronghold, one of the forts guarding the port of Boston, during the course of the war. Martial law reigned supreme in those days so far as regarded men with Southern sentiments, but once in Fort Warren the pris
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