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He gained much celebrity in a suit which involved the freedom of some slaves, known as the Lemmon case. He procured the admission of colored persons to the street-cars of New York City by gaining a suit against a railway company in 1856. Mr. Arthur did efficient service during the Civil War as quartermaster-general of the State of New York. In 1872 he was appointed collector of the port of New York, and was removed in 1878. In 1880, he was elected Vice-President, and on the death of President Garfield, Sept, 19, 1881, he became President. He died in New York City, Nov. 18, 1886. Veto of Chinese immigration bill. On April 4, 1882, President Arthur sent the following veto message to the Senate: To the Senate,--After a careful consideration of Senate Bill No. 71, entitled An act to execute certain treaty stipulations relating to Chinese. I herewith return it to the Senate, in which it originated, with my objections to its passage. A nation is justified in repudiating it
Arthur, Chester Alan, 1830-1886 Twenty-first President of the United States, from Sept. 19, 1881, to March 4, 1885; Republican; born in Fairfield, Vt., Oct. 5, 1830; was graduated at Union College in 1848; studied law, was admitted to the bar ine admission of colored persons to the street-cars of New York City by gaining a suit against a railway company in 1856. Mr. Arthur did efficient service during the Civil War as quartermaster-general of the State of New York. In 1872 he was appointedecame President. He died in New York City, Nov. 18, 1886. Veto of Chinese immigration bill. On April 4, 1882, President Arthur sent the following veto message to the Senate: To the Senate,--After a careful consideration of Senate Bill No. ing the act herewith returned, which was handed to the Secretary of State by the Chinese minister in Washington. Chester A. Arthur. Executive mansion, Washington, April 4, 1882. the memorandum. 1. The time fixed in the bill, namely, twenty
and commerce into more friendly hands. It may be that the great and paramount interest of protecting our labor from Asiatic competition may justify us in a permanent adoption of this policy; but it is wiser in the first place to make a shorter experiment with a view hereafter of maintaining permanently only such features as time and experience may commend. I transmit herewith copies of the papers relating to the recent treaty with China which accompanied the confidential message of President Hayes to the Senate of Jan. 10, 1881, and also a copy of the memorandum respecting the act herewith returned, which was handed to the Secretary of State by the Chinese minister in Washington. Chester A. Arthur. Executive mansion, Washington, April 4, 1882. the memorandum. 1. The time fixed in the bill, namely, twenty years, is unreasonable. The language of Article I. that laborers shall not be absolutely prohibited from coming to the United States and that the suspension shall be r
bject. I have said that good faith requires us to suspend the immigration of Chinese laborers for a less period than twenty years. I now add that good policy points in the same direction. Our intercourse with China is of recent date. Our first treaty with that power is not yet forty years old. It is only since we acquired California and established a great seat of commerce on the Pacific that we may be said to have broken down the barriers which fenced in that ancient monarchy. The Burlingame treaty naturally followed. Under the spirit which inspired it, many thousand Chinese laborers came to the United States. No one can say that the country has not profited by their work. They were largely instrumental in constructing the railroads which connect the Atlantic with the Pacific. The States of the Pacific slope are full of evidences of their industry. Enterprises profitable alike to the capitalist and the laborer of Caucasian origin would have been dormant but for them. A t
Arthur, Chester Alan, 1830-1886 Twenty-first President of the United States, from Sept. 19, 1881, to March 4, 1885; Republican; born in Fairfield, Vt., Oct. 5, 1830; was graduated at Union College in 1848; studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1854; and became a successful practitioner. He gained much celebrity in a suit which involved the freedom of some slaves, known as the Lemmon case. He procured the admission of colored persons to the street-cars of New York City by gaining a suit against a railway company in 1856. Mr. Arthur did efficient service during the Civil War as quartermaster-general of the State of New York. In 1872 he was appointed collector of the port of New York, and was removed in 1878. In 1880, he was elected Vice-President, and on the death of President Garfield, Sept, 19, 1881, he became President. He died in New York City, Nov. 18, 1886. Veto of Chinese immigration bill. On April 4, 1882, President Arthur sent the following veto message to the
by gaining a suit against a railway company in 1856. Mr. Arthur did efficient service during the Civil War as quartermaster-general of the State of New York. In 1872 he was appointed collector of the port of New York, and was removed in 1878. In 1880, he was elected Vice-President, and on the death of President Garfield, Sept, 19, 1881, he became President. He died in New York City, Nov. 18, 1886. Veto of Chinese immigration bill. On April 4, 1882, President Arthur sent the following venited States. The examination which I have made of the treaty and of the declarations which its negotiators have left on record of the meaning of its language leaves no doubt in my mind that neither contracting party in concluding the treaty of 1880 contemplated the passage of an act prohibiting immigration for twenty years, which is nearly a generation, or thought that such a period would be a reasonable suspension or limitation, or intended to change the provisions of the Burlingame treaty
Arthur, Chester Alan, 1830-1886 Twenty-first President of the United States, from Sept. 19, 1881, to March 4, 1885; Republican; born in Fairfield, Vt., Oct. 5, 1830; was graduated at Union College in 1848; studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1854; and became a successful practitioner. He gained much celebrity in a suit which involved the freedom of some slaves, known as the Lemmon case. He procured the admission of colored persons to the street-cars of New York City by gaining a suit against a railway company in 1856. Mr. Arthur did efficient service during the Civil War as quartermaster-general of the State of New York. In 1872 he was appointed collector of the port of New York, and was removed in 1878. In 1880, he was elected Vice-President, and on the death of President Garfield, Sept, 19, 1881, he became President. He died in New York City, Nov. 18, 1886. Veto of Chinese immigration bill. On April 4, 1882, President Arthur sent the following veto message to the
, was admitted to the bar in 1854; and became a successful practitioner. He gained much celebrity in a suit which involved the freedom of some slaves, known as the Lemmon case. He procured the admission of colored persons to the street-cars of New York City by gaining a suit against a railway company in 1856. Mr. Arthur did efficient service during the Civil War as quartermaster-general of the State of New York. In 1872 he was appointed collector of the port of New York, and was removed in 1878. In 1880, he was elected Vice-President, and on the death of President Garfield, Sept, 19, 1881, he became President. He died in New York City, Nov. 18, 1886. Veto of Chinese immigration bill. On April 4, 1882, President Arthur sent the following veto message to the Senate: To the Senate,--After a careful consideration of Senate Bill No. 71, entitled An act to execute certain treaty stipulations relating to Chinese. I herewith return it to the Senate, in which it originated, wit
Arthur, Chester Alan, 1830-1886 Twenty-first President of the United States, from Sept. 19, 1881, to March 4, 1885; Republican; born in Fairfield, Vt., Oct. 5, 1830; was graduated at Union College in 1848; studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1854; and became a successful practitioner. He gained much celebrity in a suit which involved the freedom of some slaves, known as the Lemmon case. He procured the admission of colored persons to the street-cars of New York City by gaining a suit against a railway company in 1856. Mr. Arthur did efficient service during the Civil War as quartermaster-general of the State of New York. In 1872 he was appointed collector of the port of New York, and was removed in 1878. In 1880, he was elected Vice-President, and on the death of President Garfield, Sept, 19, 1881, he became President. He died in New York City, Nov. 18, 1886. Veto of Chinese immigration bill. On April 4, 1882, President Arthur sent the following veto message to the
September 19th, 1881 AD (search for this): entry arthur-chester-alan
Arthur, Chester Alan, 1830-1886 Twenty-first President of the United States, from Sept. 19, 1881, to March 4, 1885; Republican; born in Fairfield, Vt., Oct. 5, 1830; was graduated at Union College in 1848; studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1854; and became a successful practitioner. He gained much celebrity in a suit which involved the freedom of some slaves, known as the Lemmon case. He procured the admission of colored persons to the street-cars of New York City by gaining a suit ice during the Civil War as quartermaster-general of the State of New York. In 1872 he was appointed collector of the port of New York, and was removed in 1878. In 1880, he was elected Vice-President, and on the death of President Garfield, Sept, 19, 1881, he became President. He died in New York City, Nov. 18, 1886. Veto of Chinese immigration bill. On April 4, 1882, President Arthur sent the following veto message to the Senate: To the Senate,--After a careful consideration of Sen
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