hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
G. T. Beauregard 2,953 73 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis 459 3 Browse Search
J. E. Johnston 448 0 Browse Search
L. Polk 387 13 Browse Search
Braxton Bragg 380 16 Browse Search
A. S. Johnston 328 0 Browse Search
Fort Pillow (Tennessee, United States) 260 6 Browse Search
W. J. Hardee 241 3 Browse Search
Jackson (Tennessee, United States) 207 115 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 206 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865. Search the whole document.

Found 579 total hits in 94 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
g battle, when called to the field of combat, will move by the Griersford road. A regiment of the infantry reserve will be thrown forward to the intersection of the Gravel Hill road with the Ridge road to Hamburg, as a support to the cavalry. The reserve will be formed of Breckinridge's, Bowen's, and Statham's brigades, as now organized, the whole under command of Brigadier-General Breckinridge. V. General Bragg will detail the 51st and 52d regiments Tennessee Volunteers, Blount's Alabama and Desha's Arkansas battalion, and Bairn's battery, from his corps, which, with two of Carroll's regiments, now en route for these headquarters, will form a garrison for the post and depot of Corinth. VI. Strong guards will be left at the railway bridge between Iuka and Corinth, to be furnished in due proportion from the commands at Iuka, Beirnsville, and Corinth. VII. Proper guards will be left at the camps of the several regiments of the forces in the field. Corps commanders wil
Purdy (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
same time, also left in front, by the road from Monterey to Purdy; the head of the column to reach, by night, the intersectios soon as the rear of the Third Corps shall have passed the Purdy road, and which it will then follow. The Second Corps wibe posted, in the same manner, on the road from Monterey to Purdy, with its rear resting on or about the intersection of thatoad, having advanced guards and pickets in the direction of Purdy. The forces at Bethel and Purdy will defend their positiPurdy will defend their positions, as already instructed, if attacked; otherwise they will assemble on Purdy and thence advance, with advanced guards, flanPurdy and thence advance, with advanced guards, flankers, and all other military precautions, forming a junction with the rest of the First Corps, at the intersection of that romoving, by the latter way, to assail Cheatham's division at Purdy. IX. The Chief-Engineers of the forces will take due meake Creek, branches, the one way tending westwardly towards Purdy, the other northwardly towards Crump's Landing, six miles b
Corinth (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
change or alteration, and published to the troops, in a general order, as follows: Headquarters of the forces, Corinth, Miss., March 29th, 1862. General orders, No.—. I. The undersigned assumes the command and immediate direction of the around set forth in the written order, which was afterwards printed as follows: Headquarters army of the Mississippi, Corinth, Miss., April 3d, 1862. Special orders, no. 8. I. In the impending movement, the corps of this army will march, assemble effective work will be done by the bayonet. By command of General A. S. Johnston, Thomas Jordan, A. Adjt.-Gen. Corinth, Miss., April 18th, 1862. The foregoing plan of operations and orders of engagement were drawn up and submitted by Generaccompanied by yourself, the night of the 2d of April, 1862, to the headquarters or apartments of General Bragg, at Corinth, Mississippi. On that occasion, I was not present through the whole interview, but while the interview lasted I was in and ou
Fort Henry (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
ing force, and the prolongation of our presence in front of their positions before the hour for battle, next morning; that the Federal army would, no doubt, be found intrenched to the eyes, and ready for our attack; that it was unwise to push, against breastworks, troops so raw and undisciplined as ours, badly armed and worse equipped, while their antagonists, besides the advantage of number, position, discipline, and superiority of arms, were largely composed of men lately victorious at Forts Henry and Donelson; that, from his experience in the war with Mexico and, more recently, at Manassas and Centreville, he considered volunteers, when well commanded and occupying strong defensive positions, equal to regulars, if attacked in front, as the Federals would be by us; General Sherman, in his Memoirs, says of the Federal position: The position was naturally strong, with Snake Creek on our right, a deep, bold stream, with a confluent (Owl Creek) to our right front, and Lick Creek, wi
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
General Beauregard, notwithstanding his impaired health, devoted himself assiduously to preparing the army for an immediate offensive movement, which he hoped would take place, at latest, on the 1st of April, as our spies and friends in middle Tennessee had informed us that General Buell was at Franklin, on his way to form a junction with General Grant, at Savannah, where he might be expected early in April. It was known, however, that the bridges on his line of march—especially the large n planned, or twenty-four hours earlier than it actually occurred, in which event Buell must have reached the theatre of action entirely too late to retrieve the disaster inflicted upon Grant, and must himself have been forced to retire from middle Tennessee. The delay which had marked the outset was followed by unwarrantable tardiness in the general conduct of the march, so much so that, by the evening of the 4th, the forces bivouacked at and slightly in advance of Monterey, only ten miles fro
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
f the battle of Shiloh, this phenomenon might, however, possibly have happened; for in about thirty days, with our defective means of transportation, we had collected at Corinth, from Murfreesboroa, Pensacola, Mobile, New Orleans, and other distant points, an effective force of over forty thousand men of all arms, while the Federals had failed to bring together, in time, at Pittsburg Landing, notwithstanding their ample means of land and water transportation, the armies of Buell, from Nashville, Tennessee, and of Pope, from southeast Missouri. Yet the Confederate army had advanced and was then assembled at Monterey and vicinity, less than nine miles in his front. Our forces, as they had arrived in the afternoon of the 5th, at the intersection of the Griersford (Lick Creek) and Ridge roads, from Corinth to Pittsburg, less than two miles from the Shiloh meeting-house, were formed into three lines of battle; the first, under General Hardee, extended from near Owl Creek, on the left,
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 20
positions before the hour for battle, next morning; that the Federal army would, no doubt, be found intrenched to the eyes, and ready for our attack; that it was unwise to push, against breastworks, troops so raw and undisciplined as ours, badly armed and worse equipped, while their antagonists, besides the advantage of number, position, discipline, and superiority of arms, were largely composed of men lately victorious at Forts Henry and Donelson; that, from his experience in the war with Mexico and, more recently, at Manassas and Centreville, he considered volunteers, when well commanded and occupying strong defensive positions, equal to regulars, if attacked in front, as the Federals would be by us; General Sherman, in his Memoirs, says of the Federal position: The position was naturally strong, with Snake Creek on our right, a deep, bold stream, with a confluent (Owl Creek) to our right front, and Lick Creek, with a similar confluent, on our left, thus narrowing the space over
Centreville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
rning; that the Federal army would, no doubt, be found intrenched to the eyes, and ready for our attack; that it was unwise to push, against breastworks, troops so raw and undisciplined as ours, badly armed and worse equipped, while their antagonists, besides the advantage of number, position, discipline, and superiority of arms, were largely composed of men lately victorious at Forts Henry and Donelson; that, from his experience in the war with Mexico and, more recently, at Manassas and Centreville, he considered volunteers, when well commanded and occupying strong defensive positions, equal to regulars, if attacked in front, as the Federals would be by us; General Sherman, in his Memoirs, says of the Federal position: The position was naturally strong, with Snake Creek on our right, a deep, bold stream, with a confluent (Owl Creek) to our right front, and Lick Creek, with a similar confluent, on our left, thus narrowing the space over which we could be attacked to one and a half
Narragansett (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
, 1862. The foregoing plan of operations and orders of engagement were drawn up and submitted by General Beauregard, on the morning of the 3d of April, 1862, to General A. S. Johnston, who accepted the same without modification in a single particular. Thomas Jordan, Brig.-Gen. and A. A. G. The following passage is taken from a statement of Colonel D. Urquhart, of General Bragg's staff, addressed to General Jordan. It confirms, as the reader will see, all that precedes: Narragansett, R. I., August 25th, 1880. My dear General,—I am in receipt of your letter of—, and in reply have to say, that I remember the visit of General A. S. Johnston, accompanied by yourself, the night of the 2d of April, 1862, to the headquarters or apartments of General Bragg, at Corinth, Mississippi. On that occasion, I was not present through the whole interview, but while the interview lasted I was in and out of the room repeatedly, and know that that interview was had for the consideratio
Caffey (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
s house, at the intersection of the road from Monterey to Savannah. The cavalry, thrown well forwarMajor-General Braxton Bragg, will assemble on Monterey and move thence as early as practicable, the ht wing, with left in front, by the road from Monterey to Savannah, the head of column to reach theme time, also left in front, by the road from Monterey to Purdy; the head of the column to reach, by posted, in the same manner, on the road from Monterey to Purdy, with its rear resting on or about tentrated, by the shortest and best routes, at Monterey, as soon as the rear of the Second Corps shald forward, at once, to scout on the road from Monterey to Savannah, between Mickey's and its interserces bivouacked at and slightly in advance of Monterey, only ten miles from Corinth; and it was not r rise very near each other, just westward of Monterey (in a ridge which parts the waters that fall e army had advanced and was then assembled at Monterey and vicinity, less than nine miles in his fro
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...