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Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
usively. Towards the latter part of the last century the town histories of Massachusetts give us glimpses of women taking charge of schools here and there, in a spostill. Of the fourteen high schools reported to be in existence in 1838 in Massachusetts, there were several where co-education had been the rule for years. The hi adorned by the most complete and varied group of educational structures in Massachusetts. Grounds, buildings, and improvements will represent, all told, an investmic. It is usually understood that the first superintendent of schools in Massachusetts was appointed in Springfield in 1840. Cambridge records show, however, thaexpenditure are seemingly gone forever, not simply in Cambridge, but in all Massachusetts communities of consequence. Were Cambridge suddenly and alone to go back th place which she holds to-day in the list of three hundred and fifty-three Massachusetts towns and cities to the three hundred and fifty-second, with the Indian tow
Springfield (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
confidence of his committee, the schools, and the public. It is usually understood that the first superintendent of schools in Massachusetts was appointed in Springfield in 1840. Cambridge records show, however, that the town warrant of March 17, 1836, contained an article with reference to employing a superintendent of schoolssiah Hayward was accordingly elected superintendent, April 25, 1836, and that his salary was fixed at $250. The office was not kept up long in Cambridge; but in Springfield it was permanent, so that Springfield's claim to priority has a pretty solid basis. The high school system of Cambridge embraces practically three schools,—tSpringfield's claim to priority has a pretty solid basis. The high school system of Cambridge embraces practically three schools,—the Cambridge Latin School, under the head mastership of William F. Bradbury, with 14 teachers and 388 pupils; the Cambridge English High School, under the head mastership of Ray Greene Huling, with 21 teachers and 674 pupils; and the Cambridge Manual Training School for Boys, under the superintendency of Charles H. Morse, with 10 r
Salem (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
It is not until 1643 that we find any authentic account of a school in Cambridge. In that year the curtain suddenly rises on Elijah Corlett's faire Grammar Schoole, by the side of the college. There is abundant reason for believing, however, that Cambridge was not without a school for some years prior to this date. We catch a glimpse of the Boston Latin School as early as 1635, in the pathetic record of the town that our brother Philemon Pormort shall be intreated to become its master. Salem, Charlestown, and Dorchester also had schools before 1640. The conditions for the early existence of a school were as favorable in Cambridge as elsewhere in the colony. When the town was founded in 1631, the intention was to make it the fortified political centre of the colony. It speedily became instead an important residential and intellectual centre. A writer in 1637 pictures it with artless exaggeration as one of the neatest towns in New England, with many fair structures and hand
James M. Stone (search for this): chapter 23
m of Swedish gymnastics. For eleven years Mrs. Quincy A. Shaw of Boston maintained three free kindergartens in Cambridge. A fourth was supported by a few Cambridge ladies. In 1889 the school committee assumed them as a part of the public school system and since that time have gradually added to their number until today there are eight kindergartens with 417 pupils and sixteen teachers. The city employs several special teachers. Mr. Frederick E. Chapman is director of music and Mr. James M. Stone director of drawing. There are also teachers of botany, gymnastics, and sewing. The city maintains one evening high school, four evening elementary schools, and one evening drawing school. It is sad that the blessings of school so prized by the vast majority of our citizens should fail to impress some of our number. Absenteeism in a bad sense has been heavily reduced since the founding of the city, but it still exists. Whatever its cause, whether the ignorance, indifference, m
Oliver Wendell Holmes (search for this): chapter 23
f six, was studying Latin with her father, and whom we see again nine years later reciting Greek in the C. P. P. G. S., that is, in the Cambridge Port Private Grammar School,—a school for classical instruction where Richard Henry Dana and Oliver Wendell Holmes were among her schoolmates. Here was coeducation in secondary subjects, though not in a public school, as early as 1825. In the same year a high school for girls was opened in Boston. Its very success was its defeat. It was crowded tohe army of Burgoyne from New York marched into Cambridge; Hollis, Stoughton, Holworthy, and the rest,—the sometime homes of scores of men subsequently distinguished in their respective fields of service; the site of the gambrel-roofed house where Holmes was born; the stately home of Lowell among the pines and near the willows that stirred his muse; and doubly dear, with its memories of Washington as of the poet, that of Longfellow, with its vista of the sinuous Charles and the marshes beyond; be
Mary A. Lewis (search for this): chapter 23
simple elementary principles as may be readily apprehended by the young, and the methods of study are largely objective and experimental. In the primary schools there are 5087 pupils and 116 teachers. They are under the immediate supervision of a Special Teacher of Primary Schools, whose work is directed by the superintendent of schools. Miss Lelia A. Mirick, now Mrs. Frederick S. Cutter, was the first to hold this position, which was created in 1892. She was succeeded in 1895 by Miss Mary A. Lewis. The course of study is for three years. Of the 1159 pupils graduated in June, 1894, ten per cent. completed this course in less than three years, fifty-eight per cent. in three years, and thirty-two per cent. in more than three years. Regular instruction in botany has recently been introduced; also the Ling system of Swedish gymnastics. For eleven years Mrs. Quincy A. Shaw of Boston maintained three free kindergartens in Cambridge. A fourth was supported by a few Cambridge ladie
Frederick S. Cutter (search for this): chapter 23
table of these schools is based on the data of December, 1895:— Schools.When founded.Teachers.Pupils.Principals. Allston184814571Benjamin W. Roberts. Harvard184119742James S. Barrell. Morse189011414Mary A. Townsend. Peabody18897295Frederick S. Cutter. Putnam184518688Thomas W. Davis. Shepard185212449Edward O. Grover. Thorndike186113488Ruel H. Fletcher. Washington184214453John W. Freese. Webster185317685John D. Billings. Wellington18845 Assisted by the training class.435Herbert tal. In the primary schools there are 5087 pupils and 116 teachers. They are under the immediate supervision of a Special Teacher of Primary Schools, whose work is directed by the superintendent of schools. Miss Lelia A. Mirick, now Mrs. Frederick S. Cutter, was the first to hold this position, which was created in 1892. She was succeeded in 1895 by Miss Mary A. Lewis. The course of study is for three years. Of the 1159 pupils graduated in June, 1894, ten per cent. completed this course i
Benjamin W. Roberts (search for this): chapter 23
de. Cambridge has nine grammar schools, each for both sexes, with six grades of pupils. The following table of these schools is based on the data of December, 1895:— Schools.When founded.Teachers.Pupils.Principals. Allston184814571Benjamin W. Roberts. Harvard184119742James S. Barrell. Morse189011414Mary A. Townsend. Peabody18897295Frederick S. Cutter. Putnam184518688Thomas W. Davis. Shepard185212449Edward O. Grover. Thorndike186113488Ruel H. Fletcher. Washington184214453John W. Freese. Webster185317685John D. Billings. Wellington18845 Assisted by the training class.435Herbert H. Bates. The history and work of these great schools merit a larger notice than is here possible. It may be said in passing that Mr. Roberts has been principal of the Allston School from its beginning. At the age of eighty, he shows the vigor and progressive spirit of his prime. Many of these schools had an existence under other names and conditions before the dates of their founding
W. F. Webster (search for this): chapter 23
idge has nine grammar schools, each for both sexes, with six grades of pupils. The following table of these schools is based on the data of December, 1895:— Schools.When founded.Teachers.Pupils.Principals. Allston184814571Benjamin W. Roberts. Harvard184119742James S. Barrell. Morse189011414Mary A. Townsend. Peabody18897295Frederick S. Cutter. Putnam184518688Thomas W. Davis. Shepard185212449Edward O. Grover. Thorndike186113488Ruel H. Fletcher. Washington184214453John W. Freese. Webster185317685John D. Billings. Wellington18845 Assisted by the training class.435Herbert H. Bates. The history and work of these great schools merit a larger notice than is here possible. It may be said in passing that Mr. Roberts has been principal of the Allston School from its beginning. At the age of eighty, he shows the vigor and progressive spirit of his prime. Many of these schools had an existence under other names and conditions before the dates of their founding as given abo
John D. Billings (search for this): chapter 23
r schools, each for both sexes, with six grades of pupils. The following table of these schools is based on the data of December, 1895:— Schools.When founded.Teachers.Pupils.Principals. Allston184814571Benjamin W. Roberts. Harvard184119742James S. Barrell. Morse189011414Mary A. Townsend. Peabody18897295Frederick S. Cutter. Putnam184518688Thomas W. Davis. Shepard185212449Edward O. Grover. Thorndike186113488Ruel H. Fletcher. Washington184214453John W. Freese. Webster185317685John D. Billings. Wellington18845 Assisted by the training class.435Herbert H. Bates. The history and work of these great schools merit a larger notice than is here possible. It may be said in passing that Mr. Roberts has been principal of the Allston School from its beginning. At the age of eighty, he shows the vigor and progressive spirit of his prime. Many of these schools had an existence under other names and conditions before the dates of their founding as given above, like the Shepard,
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