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Portland, Conn. (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 45
do the carving and finishing. Some of the finest monuments, headstones, tablets, and carved work have been made here, and erected in Mount Auburn and other prominent cemeteries in the United States. The works are located opposite Mount Auburn Cemetery entrance. The Connecticut steam-stone Co., incorporated April 3, 1893, with a paid — up capital of ten thousand dollars, is located on First Street, East Cambridge, and is a branch of the Connecticut Steam Brown-Stone Company of Portland, Conn., the largest stone-cutting and milling establishment in the country. E. Irving Bell, of Portland, is president; J. David Renton, treasurer; and George Everett, general manager. Their business is that of treating building-stone. Since their location in Cambridge they have invested thirty thousand dollars in the plant for stone cutting and finishing, and have been awarded contracts for such buildings as the Salem and West Newton High Schools, Lowell Court-House and State Normal School.
Brighton, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 45
on there were but nineteen institutions of the kind in the State. The original incorporators were William J. Whipple, William Hilliard, and Levi Farwell, and at a meeting of these gentlemen held in Mr. Hilliard's office on the southerly side of Brighton (now Boylston) Street, October 27, 1834, their number was increased to nine by electing Eliab W. Metcalf, Abel Willard, William Watriss, William Brown, John B. Dana, and Charles C. Little. At a meeting held November 17, 1834, at the Charles Rivde by the people of Cambridge that the accommodations furnished by the Cambridge Railway were insufficient; this culminated in the incorporation of the Charles River Railroad in 1881. Tracks were laid by this company from Harvard Square through Brighton (now Boylston), Mount Auburn streets, Putnam Avenue, and Green Street to Central Square, Main, Columbia, and Hampshire streets to the junction of the tracks of the Cambridge Railway on Broadway, the latter company having refused them the right t
Canada (Canada) (search for this): chapter 45
eight hundred church organs, by contract, which have been put in churches in nearly every State in the Union from Maine to California, besides quite a number for Canada, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia, also for the West Indies, among which may be mentioned the celebrated organ in the Cathedral of San Felipe at Havana, Cuba; also Street, Boston, about 1862. Two years later he moved to East Cambridge, where he enlarged his business, and his name soon became known over the United States and Canada for the quality and style of his work. For twenty years he ranked preeminently the leading manufacturer of furniture in America. In 1877 Mr. Geldowsky met finanre than one hundred and twenty-five skilled operators are given steady employment, and a large business has been built up, extending throughout the United States, Canada, and portions of South America. The warerooms are situated in the business portion of Boston, and are readily accessible from all parts of the city. The build
Ashfield (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 45
telescope, we find it to commence with so small a matter as the accidental breaking of a dinner-bell, in the year 1843, at the Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass. One of the students, George B. Clark by name, gathered up the fragments of the bell, took them to his home in Cambridgeport, melted them, and cast them into a disk. His father, Alvan Clark, assisted him, and the combined skill of father and son produced a five-inch reflecting telescope. Alvan Clark, the father, was born in Ashfield, Mass., in 1804, and was at this time a portrait painter; he had decided mechanical tastes, and at one time had worked as a fine-line engraver. Taking up his new work with ardor, he spent several years making glasses of gradually increasing size. The first recognition of his genius came from England. The Rev. W. R. Dawes, a leading amateur astronomer, gave him an order for a glass, which was immediately followed by an order for a second one. Mr. Clark commenced the construction of a te
Chicago (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 45
Co. has its offices in Boston, New York, and Chicago, but its manufactory and shipping department America. It has branch offices in New York, Chicago, Columbus, Atlanta, Dallas, and London, Englah L. Hayes, of Philadelphia; T. W. Gilson, of Chicago; F. M. Ambrose, of New York; and H. H. Hilton, of Chicago. The Cambridgeport Diary Company. The publication of diaries is a long establishg, Boston, and branch offices in New York and Chicago. The corporation has a very heavy capital, aw York, Iowa, Brooklyn, Philadelphia, Newark, Chicago, Boston, Atlanta, Massachusetts, Indiana, Mai have a large business in St. Louis, Buffalo, Chicago, St. Paul, Washington, Troy, and New York. company, while the branch stores in New York, Chicago, St. Louis, Denver, and San Francisco almost on, England, in 1883, and the World's Fair in Chicago in 1893, they came in competition with manufatablished in New York city, Philadelphia, and Chicago. It was found necessary to run his factory n[3 more...]
Unity, N. H. (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 45
rm was no hindrance to him in his later experience in business life. His first introduction to business was in his sixteenth year, when he entered the store of Mr. Gad Orvis, in the village of West Windsor, Vt. He remained with Mr. Orvis until the winter of 1837, and, although everything was conducted on a very small scale, he gained a good deal of insight into the methods of business management. In the winter of 1837, feeling the need of a better education, he attended the academy at Unity, N. H., of which the late Rev. A. A. Miner was then the principal; and during a part of the same year, to enable him to pay his expenses at the academy, he taught school at Cavendish, Vt. This finished his school education. He left the home of his boyhood, and moved to Boston March 19, 1838. He went to work immediately for Nathan Robbins, who was in business in Quincy Market, now commonly called Faneuil Hall Market, and continued with him until April 30, 1842, when he started for himself and f
North Adams (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 45
ighing over one million pounds each. Among the prominent American cities using the Blake water-works engines may be mentioned: Boston, New York, Washington, Camden, New Orleans, Cleveland, Mobile, Toronto, Shreveport, Helena, Birmingham, Racine, La Crosse, Mc-Keesport, etc. A partial list of places in Massachusetts includes: Cambridge, Newton, Brookline, Woburn, Natick, Hyde Park, Dedham, Needham, Wakefield, Malden, Arlington, Belmont, Walpole, Lexington, Gloucester, Marlboro, Weymouth, North Adams, Maynard, Mansfield, Randolph, Foxboro, Cohasset, Lenox, Chelsea, Brockton, Franklin, Provincetown, Canton, Stoughton, Braintree, and Wellesley. These engines are also in use in foreign water-works, as for instance at St. Petersburg, Honolulu, and Sydney. The new United States Navy is practically fitted out with Blake pumps, a partial list including the following vessels: Columbia, New York, Iowa, Brooklyn, Philadelphia, Newark, Chicago, Boston, Atlanta, Massachusetts, Indiana, Maine,
America (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 45
it the oldest book-printing establishment in America. One of the earliest books issued by the Pre to be the largest single schoolbook house in America. It has branch offices in New York, Chicago, houses of luxury or in modest homes all over America, these Cambridge-made diaries are to be foundzed, and the organs were sold in all parts of America. The manufacture was commenced on Cambridgits trade. There is probably no factory in America where there is at work more ingenious machinehis part. No assumption is more certain in America than that a man who works with energy, intelln fact, this certainty of success which makes America the Eldorado of workmen. In the case of the nd agencies in nearly all the large cities in America, with a foreign representative. A brief hi kinds of wood than can be found elsewhere in America. Their extensive storehouses are filled winor of being the oldest ladder manufactory in America. Their product is extension ladders, step la[1 more...]
La Crosse (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): chapter 45
employees at the present time is about one thousand. The pumping machinery is shipped in quantity to every quarter of the globe, and ranges in size from pumps of a few hundred pounds weight to the highest grade of water-works pumping engines weighing over one million pounds each. Among the prominent American cities using the Blake water-works engines may be mentioned: Boston, New York, Washington, Camden, New Orleans, Cleveland, Mobile, Toronto, Shreveport, Helena, Birmingham, Racine, La Crosse, Mc-Keesport, etc. A partial list of places in Massachusetts includes: Cambridge, Newton, Brookline, Woburn, Natick, Hyde Park, Dedham, Needham, Wakefield, Malden, Arlington, Belmont, Walpole, Lexington, Gloucester, Marlboro, Weymouth, North Adams, Maynard, Mansfield, Randolph, Foxboro, Cohasset, Lenox, Chelsea, Brockton, Franklin, Provincetown, Canton, Stoughton, Braintree, and Wellesley. These engines are also in use in foreign water-works, as for instance at St. Petersburg, Honolulu,
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 45
ing sleighs, and the first omnibus built in New England. In 1834 they took the contract to build sost modern improvements, being the first in New England to introduce individual electric motors forons per day, which is distributed mostly in New England. The plant has all the latest improvementsto its trade in New York, Pennsylvania, and New England. It was at one time extensively engaged ve men. They have a large trade all through New England. A. B. & E. L. Shaw. A. B. & E. L. Shanufacture of fine upholstered furniture in New England, and have furnished some of the finest clube. The firm do a large business throughout New England in desks, bookcases, plumbers' supplies, Ph now the largest concern of the kind in the New England States. Mr. George G. Page, whose name the forty hands. The output is sold mainly in New England, although there is some export trade. Elmet, the industry was once a prominent one in New England. Competition in the West and the ability t[20 more...]
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