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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3. Search the whole document.

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Quincy (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
the wants, wrongs, and oppressions of our own age and our own country. Lib. 17.3. And since then, on his journeys as General Agent of the Massachusetts Society, he had perceived that it was much more difficult to get the ear of the people at large, in order to lay before them the story of the wrongs and sufferings of their enslaved countrymen, on the first day of the week than on any other Lib. 18.67.—thus making Sunday not the best but the worst day of the week. Contrary to Phillips's and Quincy's Ante, pp. 218, 219. view, therefore, anti-Sabbatarianism must, for abolitionists, be allowed to have been a moral rather than a theological reform. As for Mr. Garrison himself, his emancipation from the traditional views of the Sabbath proceeded on lines already displayed in this narrative; and Ante, 2.51, 107-114, 152-154; 3.3, 9, 65. as far back as the summer of 1844, remarking the roving commission of the Rev. Justin Edwards, D. D., of Andover, for a year past, to enforce Sabbataria
Oregon (Oregon, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
hted by a settlement which temporarily removed the grounds of its agitation, and therefore of its excuse for being. It had no share, as a party, in the anti-slavery achievements of the year under consideration, when the South was forced to admit Oregon Lib. 18.130. with its prohibition of slavery—Polk assenting on the Lib. 18.133; 19.18. pretext that the new State lay north of the Missouri Compromise parallel if protracted (as he, like Calhoun, would 36° 30′. have had it); when, in the HouseAdd the defeat by the House of the Clayton compromise measure—the final Southern Lib. 18.115, 118, 122, 123. attempt to enforce the assumption that the free status of the Northwestern Territory was debatable, and to make a nominal concession to Oregon serve as a counter in the game to win New Mexico and California for slavery. Amid all this, the contemner of compromise, John C. Calhoun, passed most unhappy days. He had, as Secretary of State, engineered the annexation of Texas, in order to
Scotland (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 8
who stole Mr. Garrison's overcoat containing the Lib. 18.62. phonographic report, and whose remorse was so nicely graduated that he returned the garment without the papers. The odium redoubled upon Mr. Garrison by the Lib. 18.22, 53, 64. religious press had a special regard to his abolitionism. Concern for the sanctity of a day was, on both sides Lib. 18.50. of the Atlantic, conspicuously manifested by those most indifferent to the desecration of man. Thus, abroad, the Free Church of Scotland was raising money to Lib. 18.50; Ms. Jan. 10, 1848, W. L. G. to E. M. Davis. support the operations of a Sabbath League. At home, a New England pro-slavery Sabbatarian press recoiled from the spectacle of the Rev. John G. Palfrey, a Massachusetts Representative in Congress, addressing to the Hon. Lib. 18.14. Robert C. Winthrop, candidate for the Speakership of the House, a catechism as to his probable use of the office with reference to slavery and the Mexican War—on Sunday! But no pain
Darlington (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 8
s because I am the least advanced in the cure. My organ of mirthfulness is constantly excited. . . . Most of the females are young ladies, all of them remarkably silent (for their sex, of course), and none of them very interesting (though I dare say they are all very worthy), excepting a Miss Thayer from Rochester, N. Y., who, Abby G. Thayer. being a Garrisonian abolitionist, and a thoroughgoing reformer, must, of course, be very agreeable. She reminds me a little of Elizabeth Pease of Darlington, though younger by one-half. She is a rigid Grahamite, and deems it wrong to take the life of any animal for food—even to destroy a spider or snake. She was surprised, she said, to see me, yesterday, take up a stone to kill a snake which lay across my pathway, a few yards from the house, with his forked tongue thrust out in self-defence; though he got away unharmed. W. L. Garrison to his Wife. Bensonville, July 26, 1848. Ms. To-day there is to be a Free Soil Convention in Nort
Nazareth, Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
onward—if not rapidly, without faltering. He changed his views and positions from time to time, but only to advance—never to retreat. Theologically, he is to be regarded as a prodigy on the score of independent investigation and free utterance. In this field, his labors cannot be overestimated. Again—he moved in a wealthy and an aristocratic circle, or rather was surrounded by those who are the last to sympathize with outcast humanity, or to believe that any good thing can come out of Nazareth. To write and speak on the subject of slavery as he did—unsatisfactory as it was to the abolitionists, who yearned to have him take still higher ground —was, in his position, an act of true heroism and of positive self-sacrifice; and, for a time—extending almost to the hour of his death—cost him the friendship of many whose good opinions nothing but a sense of duty could induce him to forfeit. The Unitarian denomination, as such, was deeply afflicted Ante, p. 24. and mortified at
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
penalty of the law; but, should they venture to labor even for bread on that day, or be guilty of what is called Sabbath desecration, they are liable either to fine or imprisonment! Cases of this kind have occurred in Massachusetts, Vermont, Pennsylvania, and Ohio, within a comparatively short period, where conscientious and upright persons have been thrust into prison for an act no more intrinsically heinous than that of gathering in a crop of hay, or selling moral or philanthropic publicatiuary, 1847, was twice put in jail in West Chester, Pa. (the second time for six days), for selling anti-slavery books on Sunday (Lib. 17.54, 59; Penn. Freeman, Mar. 25, 1847). For the conviction of a Seventh-Day Baptist farmer for working, in Pennsylvania, on Sunday, see Lib. 18: 119. There is, therefore, no liberty of conscience allowed to the people of this country, under the laws thereof, in regard to the observance of a Sabbath day. The last sentence originally read, . . . observance or
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
t is called Sabbath desecration, they are liable either to fine or imprisonment! Cases of this kind have occurred in Massachusetts, Vermont, Pennsylvania, and Ohio, within a comparatively short period, where conscientious and upright persons have bis animated by the spirit of religious bigotry and ecclesiastical tyranny—the spirit which banished the Baptists from Massachusetts, and subjected the Quakers to imprisonment and death, in the early settlement of this country —admits of little doubterable, and is every day increasing. Lewis Cass. It seems probable, now, that there will be no choice of electors in Massachusetts, by the people, at the November election. So the event proved (Lib. 18: 182). I long to see the day when the great. Garrison's letters have just shown, the agitation was carried on during the month of July. The Conscience Whigs of Massachusetts were in revolt Lib. 18.94, 98, 102. against the action of their party at Philadelphia on June 7, when the popular he
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 8
the Sabbatical yoke yet more heavily on the necks of the American people. In a recent appeal made for pecuniary assistance by the Executive Committee of that Union, it is stated that the Secretary (Rev. Dr. Edwards) has visited twenty of the United States, and travelled more than thirty thousand miles, addressing public bodies of all descriptions, and presenting reasons why, as a nation, we should keep the Sabbath,—all secular business, travelling, and amusement be confined to six days in a weture or reason, and a shameful act of imposture and tyranny. We claim for ourselves, and for all mankind, the right to worship God according to the dictates of our own consciences. This right, inherent and inalienable, is cloven down in the United States; and we call upon all who desire to preserve civil and religious liberty to rally for its rescue. . . . We are aware that we shall inevitably be accused, by the chief priests, scribes, and Pharisees of the present time, as was Jesus by the
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 8
efore, and on the eve of as base a compromise. The Free Soil Party arose as soon as possible after the enormous acquisitions of territory through the treaty with Mexico had intensified the dread of proslavery aggrandizement; but it was feeble in numbers on Lib. 18.194; 19.3. its first demonstration at the polls, and before it co forestall British (and therefore abolition) possession, but he was no manifest destiny filibuster, and he was filled with alarm at the wholesale dismemberment of Mexico Lib. 18.10. contemplated by some of his section after the conquest. He dreaded the taking into a white man's government Lib. 18.10. new States both free and inounds. On the other, the defensive seizure of a vast, sparsely-settled wilderness to the north of the Gila and the Rio Grande, dedicated to freedom by the law of Mexico, and which slavery Ante, 1.158. could not colonize as fast as freedom, returned to plague the inventor, by renewing his mortal apprehension of the Ante, p. 216.
West Chester (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
esecration, they are liable either to fine or imprisonment! Cases of this kind have occurred in Massachusetts, Vermont, Pennsylvania, and Ohio, within a comparatively short period, where conscientious and upright persons have been thrust into prison for an act no more intrinsically heinous than that of gathering in a crop of hay, or selling moral or philanthropic publications. Allusion is here made to the case of Charles C. Burleigh, who in February, 1847, was twice put in jail in West Chester, Pa. (the second time for six days), for selling anti-slavery books on Sunday (Lib. 17.54, 59; Penn. Freeman, Mar. 25, 1847). For the conviction of a Seventh-Day Baptist farmer for working, in Pennsylvania, on Sunday, see Lib. 18: 119. There is, therefore, no liberty of conscience allowed to the people of this country, under the laws thereof, in regard to the observance of a Sabbath day. The last sentence originally read, . . . observance or non-observance of the first day of the week a
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