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Mississippi (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.65
ealed against help from the outside world to the Confederacy, which had to organize its government and improvise everything for the unequal struggle from an agricultural population. With an army of 600,000 men and no navy, except a few river steamers and privateers, opposed by an army outnumbering it by 2,000,000 of soldiers, by a navy of 700 vessels of war, manned by 105,000 men; with a fleet of transports, steamers, barges, and coal floats almost innumerable, which in 1862, on the Mississippi river and its tributaries alone, numbered over 2,200 vessels. (It is not known what was the number of vessels chartered on the Atlantic and Gulf coasts in moving the large armies.) The navy in its help was as decisive in results as the great armies in the field in blockading ports, in cutting up the Confederacy by her rivers, in establishing many depots and points of departure from the rivers and along the coast for armies to invade and overrun new territory, and in transporting armies arou
Poland (Poland) (search for this): chapter 1.65
ts we sentence the unfortunate. Men do not idly erect monuments to lost causes. Fame has no trumpet for failure. The world hears not the voice of the vanquished. Yet history might teach us strange things of men who fail and causes that are lost. Genius did not keep Hannibal or Napoleon from defeat; heroism went with Joan of Arc to the stake, and Emmett to the scaffold. The eloquence of Demosthenes did not save Greece, or Cato's virtue Rome. The courage of Kosciusko availed naught for Poland, and Hungary went down for all the patriotism of Kossuth. Sometimes defeat gives a tragic pathos which lifts the commonplace into the immortal, and tenderly preserves the memory of the vanquished long after the victor has been forgotten. Since the death of Napoleon there has been no career which illustrates so dramatically the vicissitudes of fortune as that of Jefferson Davis. Born amid the rugged surroundings of a frontier State, he lived to win the triple glory of the soldier, the or
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 1.65
on foreign soil, he is generally believed to have saved the day. Truly represented us. We love and respect him, for he truly represented us in his political life. He became a member of Congress in 1845, resigning the next year to serve in Mexico. Upon his return from the war he became United States Senator. He was eight years a member of the Senate, during the most brilliant epoch of its history, where he sustained himself as an equal in debate with the most illustrious statesmen in Amaylor, Major, Thomas, 9th Virginia Cavalry, 215. Taylor, Colonel Walter H., 73, 267. Terry, General W. R., 87. Texas, Reconstruction in, 4; its fidelity to the Confederacy, 43; its aid to the Confederacy in supplies, 44; officers who went to Mexico, 53. Thomas alias Zarvona. Colonel, 88. Thompson, Major J. W., a martyr, 249, 274. Tobacco Cure, Clingman's, 307. Torpedoes, War history of, 284. University of North Carolina in the Civil War, 1; Alumni of, in public life, and the
Shady Grove (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.65
Roller, A. H., 294. Ruggles, General, Daniel, 66. Ruffin, Edmond, 111. Ruffin, Julian M., 111. Sailor's Creek, Battle of, 83, 250. St Nicholas, Capture of the Federal steamer, 88. Salem Church, Action at. 100. Savannah Guard; its part at Sailor's Creek, 250. Schaller, Colonel, Frank, 277. Schuricht, Diary of Lieutenant H.; Gettysburg Campaign, 339. Secession a Constitutional right, 369. Seddon, James A., 27. Seven Days Battles. Casualties in the, 143, 262. Shady Grove, Battle of, 101. Sharpsburg, The battle of, discussed, 267; forces at the battle, 272, 331. Shelby, General, Joe, Address of, April 26, 1865, 42. Shepherdstown, Battle of, 331. Shepherd, Joseph H, 151. Shiloh, Battle of, 66; forces engaged in, and compiled account of, 119. Slatter, W. J., 309. Slaughter, General James E., 309. Slaves, Emancipation of the, 53; their conduct during the war, 54. Smith, Miss Anna M. D., 40. Smith, General, E. Kirby, 44, 51. Smith,
Salem (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.65
nd deeply beloved than any other man in the history of the nation. If his enemies had succeeded in putting him to death he would have been the most conspicuous figure in American history. See him as he is. When the mists of passion and prejudice have passed away the calm light of justice gives the right niche to each figure in history. The descendants of the men who burned Joan of Arc now regard her as a character of heroism and beauty. The posterity of the men who hanged witches in Salem as a pious duty now hear the story with horror. The descendants of the men who to-day look on Jefferson Davis with unkind expressions will see him as we do—the stainless gentleman, the gallant soldier, the devoted patriot, the pure and gifted statesman. I do not propose to discuss now the unhappy causes leading to the war between the States. It is still too soon. Criminating and recriminating over irritating causes of differences cannot readjust what the war has settled. We must wait
West Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.65
. We love and honor Mr. Davis for his eminent public services. He came from a stock distinguished for its patriotism. His father and uncles fought through the Revolutionary war. Three of his brothers were in the war of 1812. As a cadet at West Point, he entered the service of his country, and for twelve years he bore its arms. He rendered conspicuous service in the Black Hawk war against the Indians. In the Mexican war his gallantry at the storming of Monterey was most conspicuous, whileof, 237 Old Dominion Dragoons, Roll of, 187. Ox Hill, Battle of, 331. Parrott, W. A., 115. Pawnee, The Federal gunboat, 90. Perry, Leslie J., 145. 301. Pettigrew, General J., 16, 260. Pickett, General George E., Appointment of to West Point; his characteristics, 151. Pickett, Mrs. La Salle Corbeil, 154. Polk, General, Leonidas, 130. Pope, Movements in the war of General John, 353. Pouncing on pickets, 213. Powell, C. H., 359. Randall, James R., 277 Rawlins, General
North Anna (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.65
Battle of, 101, 336. Minor, Lieutenant Robert D., 91. Mission Ridge, Battle of, 95. Monroe, General Thomas B., 58. Morgan, General, John, Famous Raid of, 194. Morgan, Colonel, Richard, 194. Mosby's Men, Hanging of, by General Custer, in 1864, 109. Morse, Captain, Edward, 225. Murfreesboro, Battle of, 67. Munford, General Thomas T., 132. Murrah, General, Pendleton, 43. Neimeyer, Colonel, Wm. F., killed, 101. Newmarket, Heroism of the V. M. I. Cadets at 302. North Anna, Battle of, 262, 266. North Carolina; Armory Guards, 6th Battalion, 231: 22d Infantry, History of the, 256; 28th Infantry, History of the, 324; University of, 1; Union sentiment in 1861, and the action of the Assembly of, 5; its Alumni in public and military life, 9, 11; losses of the troops in the C. S. Army, 17; supplied the Confederacy by blockade running, 36; soldiers of, paroled at Appomattox C. H., 254 Nottoway Grays, Company G, 18th Virginia Infantry, Organization and record o
Franklin (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.65
orces, 179. Ellyson, Hon., J. Taylor, 365. Essex Sharpshooters at Chancellorsville, 206. Fayetteville Arsenal; its history, and that of the 6th N. C. Battalion, Armory Guards, with roster, 231. Flag, History and description of the Confederate, 117. Flournoy, Colonel T. S., 133. Ford, Captain N. P., 284. Forrest. Dispatch of General N. B., to General L. Polk, 92. Forts; Curtis, 197. Donelson, 197, 317. Fisher, 276, Henry, 198. Morris' Island, 228. Sumter, 14, 228. Franklin, Tenn., Carnage at battle of, 189. Frazier's Farm, Battle of, 102. Fredericksburg, Battle of, 99. Front Royal, May 23, 1862, Battle of, 131. Funkhouser, Captain R. D., 80. Fussell's Mill, Battle of, 337. G, Company, 49th Virginia Infantry, Roll of, 171. Gardner, General, Frank. 67 Gettysburg, Battle of; North Carolina troops engaged in the, 16, 100; Heth's Brigade at, 264; Jenkins' Cavalry Brigade at, 339. Goldsmith, Colonel W I., 79. Goochland Light Artillery, Capta
ridge, General J. C. Bitter feeling between him and General Bragg, 68. Breedlove, J. W., 211. Bristow Station, Action at, 101, 335, 356. Brockenbrough, Colonel J. W., 185. Brockenbrough, Dr. W. S. R., 193 Bucknerand McClellan. How the former outwitted the latter General, 295. Bull Run, Casualties in Second Battle of, 143. Burgess' Mill, Action at, 103. Butt, M. F., killed, 101. Campbell, John A., Assistant-Secretary of War, 357 Capston, Lieutenant J. L. His mission to Ireland, 202. Cary Rebellion, The, 2. Catlett's Station, Action at, 99. Cedar Mountain, Casualties in Battle of, 143, 262. Cedar Run, Battle of, 331. Chalmers, General J. R , 122. Chancellorsville, Battle of, 100-205, 264; burnt field of, 333. Chattanooga, 92. Chickamauga, Battle of, 92. Clarke Cavalry (Co. D), 1st Virginia Cavalry; history and roster of, 145. Clingman, General T. L., The career of, 303; duel with W. L. Yancey, 304; as a Senator, 306; his tobacco cure,
Cedar Mountain (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.65
J. W., 211. Bristow Station, Action at, 101, 335, 356. Brockenbrough, Colonel J. W., 185. Brockenbrough, Dr. W. S. R., 193 Bucknerand McClellan. How the former outwitted the latter General, 295. Bull Run, Casualties in Second Battle of, 143. Burgess' Mill, Action at, 103. Butt, M. F., killed, 101. Campbell, John A., Assistant-Secretary of War, 357 Capston, Lieutenant J. L. His mission to Ireland, 202. Cary Rebellion, The, 2. Catlett's Station, Action at, 99. Cedar Mountain, Casualties in Battle of, 143, 262. Cedar Run, Battle of, 331. Chalmers, General J. R , 122. Chancellorsville, Battle of, 100-205, 264; burnt field of, 333. Chattanooga, 92. Chickamauga, Battle of, 92. Clarke Cavalry (Co. D), 1st Virginia Cavalry; history and roster of, 145. Clingman, General T. L., The career of, 303; duel with W. L. Yancey, 304; as a Senator, 306; his tobacco cure, 307. Cloninger, Lieutenant W. W., killed, 333. Cohoon's Battalion disbanded, 9
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