hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Jefferson Davis 833 7 Browse Search
United States (United States) 442 0 Browse Search
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) 353 11 Browse Search
U. S. Grant 296 2 Browse Search
Maryland (Maryland, United States) 254 0 Browse Search
William T. Sherman 209 7 Browse Search
Robert E. Lee 160 0 Browse Search
A. Lincoln 156 0 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln 142 0 Browse Search
C. C. Lee 140 2 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

Found 282 total hits in 97 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...
Dorchester (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.28
a romantic, sanguine temperament, ever alert and ripe for perilous service, he commanded the admiration and confidence of all within reach of his voice or example. His superior officers were impressed with his exceptional worth, and he received less promotion than he deserved; but his fame will descend through generations following those who were his comrades in arms. The genealogy of the Goldsboroughs appears in Old Kent. The grandfather of Major Goldsborough was a native of Dorchester county, Maryland. He removed to Frederick county in 8000, where the father of Major Goldsborough, Leander W. Goldsborough, was born and spent part of his life, removing to Hanover, Pa., in 1845. His son, William Worthington, was born at Graceham, Frederick county, Md., October 6, 1831; was educated at Hanover, Pa., and learned the trade of a printer, afterward becoming foreman of the Pittsburg Dispatch, but he went to Baltimore about 1850 and found employment on newspapers until May, 1861. As a
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.28
d employment on newspapers until May, 1861. As a compositor and proof-reader he atttained great proficiency. In politics he was always an old school Democrat. In 1857 he joined Captain D. E. Woodburn's company in the Baltimore City Guard Battalion, one of the best known military commands in the United States, and after four years drilling and instruction he was well fitted for the duties of a soldier and an officer in field service. His company, with others, having been sent to Harper's Ferry, Va., to aid in subduing John Brown's murderous raid, in October, 1859, they closed upon the United States Marines who battered down the door of Brown's Fort and rushed in, Goldsborough and another of his company were the first militiamen to enter with the marines. In May, 1861, Goldsborough, in his thirtieth year, enlisted as a private in Captain E. R. Dorsey's company in the First Maryland Infantry. In June following he was elected captain of Company A to succeed Captain Bradley T. J
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.28
repulsing many attacks in heavy force and often making counter charges. It was truthfully said that the air was thick with leaden hail. When physical endurance and cartridges alike were nearly exhausted, Captain Booth providentially discovered General Pender's brigade moving to the firing, when that gallant officer promptly reinforced Colonel Johnson's decimated but invincible line (in much the same way that the First Maryland and Third Tennessee advanced upon, drove the enemy and saved Jackson's flank at First Manassas.) In this bloody battle of Second Manassas, Captain Goldsborough was severely and it was then thought mortally wounded; but careful nursing by hospitable Virginians in the Bull Run mountains restored him in time (in the latter part of 1862) to take the captaincy of Company G, Second Maryland Infantry (which succeeded the First Maryland), being shortly afterward elected major, under Lieutenant-Colonel James R. Herbert, who had been Captain of Company D, in the First
McAllister (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.28
ent. The grandfather of Major Goldsborough was a native of Dorchester county, Maryland. He removed to Frederick county in 8000, where the father of Major Goldsborough, Leander W. Goldsborough, was born and spent part of his life, removing to Hanover, Pa., in 1845. His son, William Worthington, was born at Graceham, Frederick county, Md., October 6, 1831; was educated at Hanover, Pa., and learned the trade of a printer, afterward becoming foreman of the Pittsburg Dispatch, but he went to BaltiHanover, Pa., and learned the trade of a printer, afterward becoming foreman of the Pittsburg Dispatch, but he went to Baltimore about 1850 and found employment on newspapers until May, 1861. As a compositor and proof-reader he atttained great proficiency. In politics he was always an old school Democrat. In 1857 he joined Captain D. E. Woodburn's company in the Baltimore City Guard Battalion, one of the best known military commands in the United States, and after four years drilling and instruction he was well fitted for the duties of a soldier and an officer in field service. His company, with others, having
Maryland Line (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.28
A Maryland Warrior and hero. Death of Major William W. Goldsborough, of the famous Maryland line, C. S. A. Military funeral in Baltimore—sketch of his eventful life and distinguished services—soldier, Journalist, Historian. By Winfield Peters, Lieutenant-Colonel, etc., U. C. V., Maryland Member Historical Committee, etc., United Confederate Veterans. On Christmas afternoon last the startling information was telegraphed to Baltimore of the unexpected death in Philadelphia of Majoelphia, contributing war articles to the Record and annotating for the war collection of D. Parish, Esq., in the New York Historical Society. About two years ago Major Goldsborough was engaged by Mr. Parish to write a history of the famous Maryland Line in the Confederate army in Ms., inlaid, and to contain portraits and illustrations by a well known Philadelphia artist, the workmanship and finishing to be the very best and durable, one volume only to be made, for perpetual preservation. Th
Hunterstown (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.28
While thus engaged, he was entertained as a guest at the Maryland Line Confederate Soldiers' Home, Pikesville, Md., the superintendent being Sergeant Wm. H. Pope, of his company, A, First Maryland Regiment. Still being desirous to do full justice to the Maryland Confederates, he was at his death engaged in gathering materials for a third volume, which it is probable will ultimately appear. With this end in view he spent much of last summer with his brother, Charles E. Goldsborough at Hunterstown, Pa., near Gettysburg and the battlefield. No one but Major Goldsborough has ever attempted to chronicle completely and historically the deeds and incidents connected with the Maryland Confederates. The Maryland Line, C. S. A., was created by Act of the Confederate Congress, and consisted of infantry, cavalry and artillery, under Colonel Bradley T. Johnson, whom General R. E. Lee declared, with diffuse compliments, most worthy to command Marylanders. A grandson of Colonel Baker Johnson
Culp's Hill (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.28
e, 1863, which resulted in their total defeat and the capture of about four thousand in all. Milroy, outlawed by President Davis, escaping with a few hundred cavalry. Major Goldsborough, reconnoitering, was one of the first officers with a detachment to enter the town. In the battle of Gettysburg, the Second Maryland, in General George H. Steuart's brigade, Johnson's division, participated with conspicuous valor and suffered dreadfully. They helped carry the enemy's advanced works on Culp's Hill on the evening of the second day—July 2, 1863—the ascent being over huge rocks and other serious obstructions; yet while breaking the alignments and delaying the advance, the large boulders served in a measure to shield the men from the bullets of the enemy. Nightfall came, yet the brave band pushed on, directed by the continuous flash from the rifles behind the breastworks. When close upon the enemy, Major Goldsborough sought Lieutenant-Colonel Walton, commanding the Twenty-third Virgi
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.28
r, because the respective charges of Pickett's division and Steuart's brigade, in directions about opposite, moving toward each other, would, if successful, have cut Meade's army in twain. His superior numbers and his earthworks saved him. Were Stonewall Jackson alive, Gettysburg would have been Meade's Waterloo. Colonel Herbert and Major Goldsborough were among five or six hundred Confederate officers, prisoners of war, who were placed within range of the Confederate batteries at Charleston, S. C., during the fierce Federal assault on that city; suffering many hardships and privations, having often killed and eaten cats and other animals! What could have been more cowardly and despicable than such treatment to such heroes! Colonel Herbert's exchange was effected, but Major Goldsborough remained a prisoner until the war was over. Soon after the war Major Goldsborough established the Winchester, Va., Times, which he afterward sold and went to Philadelphia to reside. Major
Front Royal (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.28
in the First Maryland Infantry. In June following he was elected captain of Company A to succeed Captain Bradley T. Johnson, promoted to Major, serving thus until the muster out of the regiment, August 17, 1862, participating in both the campaigns in the Valley of Virginia, i. e., in 1861 under General Joseph E. Johnston, and in 1862 under Stonewall Jackson; also in the First Manassas battle and campaign in 1861 and in the Seven Days Battles below Richmond, in June and July, 1862. Near Front Royal, Va., during the battle on May 23d, 1862, he had the singular privilege of capturing his brother Charles and sending him to the rear with the other prisoners. The fight was between First Maryland Confederate and First Maryland Federal, and the latter was badly defeated, most of them were captured, although outnumbering their antagonist nearly three to one. So much for the genuine article versus the spurious. Stonewall Jackson on his march to Pope's rear at Manassas, in August, 1862,
Washington (Washington, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.28
other animals! What could have been more cowardly and despicable than such treatment to such heroes! Colonel Herbert's exchange was effected, but Major Goldsborough remained a prisoner until the war was over. Soon after the war Major Goldsborough established the Winchester, Va., Times, which he afterward sold and went to Philadelphia to reside. Major Goldsborough was with the Philadelphia Record from 1870 to 1890. In 1890 he migrated to the far Northwest, settling at Tacoma in Washington State. Here he came in contact with what was regarded as the roughest gang of printers on the Pacific Coast. Prior to his arrival no one had dared to run counter to them; but as foreman of the Tacoma Daily Globe he cleared out the gang, unionized the office and made it one of the best on the slope. This feat gained for him the title Fighting Foreman. Upon the sale of the Globe, Major Goldsborough removed to Everett, Washington, where he had invested in real estate. He worked for a time o
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...