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etary, John M. Cooley was called for, who addressed the meeting in an able and eloquent speech of about twenty minutes. He condemned the policy of the Administration; spoke of the many constitutional violations and usurpations of the President; did not look upon our Government as a consolidated one, but as a Government of limited powers, deriving its powers from the people. He thought the Union or the Constitution did not impair our State rights, his views being the same as those of Madison, Jay and Hamilton. His speech was well received throughout, and he took his seat amid great applause. Dr. J. T. Hays was then called for, who made a brilliant speech of fifteen minutes--portrayed the policy of the Black Republican party, the past as well as the present; could see no difference between John Brown and Lincoln, except that one represented and led on a small force, the other a very large one; wished for a speedy termination of our national difficulties. The Doctor's speech met
Daniel Martin (search for this): article 3
ifference between John Brown and Lincoln, except that one represented and led on a small force, the other a very large one; wished for a speedy termination of our national difficulties. The Doctor's speech met with a warm reception and much applause. On motion the meeting proceeded to ballot for delegates, when the following gentlemen were declared to be elected: Delegates.--W. A. Patterson, Major W. B. Stephenson, Samuel Sutton, George Stephenson, R. H. Smith, Dr. J. T. Hays, Daniel Martin, John M. Cooley, Dr. J. A. Preston, B. F. Heath. Alternates.--W. B. Michael, James Chesney, Dr. J. K. Sappington, John P. Dallam, Bennett Tilbert, R. Henly, A. Osborn, Thomas Jeffry, James Stephenson. W. Ewing, Jr., was then called for, and responded in a speech of twenty minutes. Spoke of the different branches of the General Government; regarded the Supreme Court as a co-ordinate and not a subordinate branch of the General Government, and, as such, the Supreme Court had as mu
ation of the Constitution and laws; and on the other civil war, endless and oppressive taxation, and the total loss of constitutional liberty." Great peace meeting at Ithaca. On Saturday last one of the largest meetings was held at Ithaca, New York, that has ever assembled in that town. The Town Hall was, crowded to excess, and so large was the number of persons pressing for admission that, on motion of Mr. Chauncy Grant, they adjourned to the Park. Here they were addressed by Messrs. McDow and Halsey, who advocated peace in the strongest terms. The meeting was composed of the most respectable citizens and farmers from the neighborhood, all of whom were evidently of a very different class from those Northerners who now congregate at Washington. The muddle of the New York press. In an article severely denouncing Lincoln and the course which has characterized his Administration, the Cincinnati Gazette thus concludes: What Administration could have been in sympa
John P. Dallam (search for this): article 3
r a speedy termination of our national difficulties. The Doctor's speech met with a warm reception and much applause. On motion the meeting proceeded to ballot for delegates, when the following gentlemen were declared to be elected: Delegates.--W. A. Patterson, Major W. B. Stephenson, Samuel Sutton, George Stephenson, R. H. Smith, Dr. J. T. Hays, Daniel Martin, John M. Cooley, Dr. J. A. Preston, B. F. Heath. Alternates.--W. B. Michael, James Chesney, Dr. J. K. Sappington, John P. Dallam, Bennett Tilbert, R. Henly, A. Osborn, Thomas Jeffry, James Stephenson. W. Ewing, Jr., was then called for, and responded in a speech of twenty minutes. Spoke of the different branches of the General Government; regarded the Supreme Court as a co-ordinate and not a subordinate branch of the General Government, and, as such, the Supreme Court had as much right and power to set aside the functions of the President, as the President had a right or power to set aside the functions of th
Alternates.--W. B. Michael, James Chesney, Dr. J. K. Sappington, John P. Dallam, Bennett Tilbert, R. Henly, A. Osborn, Thomas Jeffry, James Stephenson. W. Ewing, Jr., was then called for, and responded in a speech of twenty minutes. Spoke of the different branches of the General Government; regarded the Supreme Court as a cr to set aside the functions of the Supreme Court. Looked upon the Constitution as the law of limitation upon the one side and of obedience upon the other. Mr. Ewing also spoke of our country, her boundless resources and mighty improvements; looked forward to the amicable settlement of our national difficulties, and hoped for the future prosperity of our nation. Mr. Ewing left the floor amid much applause. Primary meeting at Centreville. A large and enthusiastic meeting was held at Centreville, Queen Anne's county, Md., on the 3d instant, at which several spirited addresses were made, and twenty-five delegates appointed to the Peace Conventio
B. F. Heath (search for this): article 3
that one represented and led on a small force, the other a very large one; wished for a speedy termination of our national difficulties. The Doctor's speech met with a warm reception and much applause. On motion the meeting proceeded to ballot for delegates, when the following gentlemen were declared to be elected: Delegates.--W. A. Patterson, Major W. B. Stephenson, Samuel Sutton, George Stephenson, R. H. Smith, Dr. J. T. Hays, Daniel Martin, John M. Cooley, Dr. J. A. Preston, B. F. Heath. Alternates.--W. B. Michael, James Chesney, Dr. J. K. Sappington, John P. Dallam, Bennett Tilbert, R. Henly, A. Osborn, Thomas Jeffry, James Stephenson. W. Ewing, Jr., was then called for, and responded in a speech of twenty minutes. Spoke of the different branches of the General Government; regarded the Supreme Court as a co-ordinate and not a subordinate branch of the General Government, and, as such, the Supreme Court had as much right and power to set aside the functions of
John Brown (search for this): article 3
overnment of limited powers, deriving its powers from the people. He thought the Union or the Constitution did not impair our State rights, his views being the same as those of Madison, Jay and Hamilton. His speech was well received throughout, and he took his seat amid great applause. Dr. J. T. Hays was then called for, who made a brilliant speech of fifteen minutes--portrayed the policy of the Black Republican party, the past as well as the present; could see no difference between John Brown and Lincoln, except that one represented and led on a small force, the other a very large one; wished for a speedy termination of our national difficulties. The Doctor's speech met with a warm reception and much applause. On motion the meeting proceeded to ballot for delegates, when the following gentlemen were declared to be elected: Delegates.--W. A. Patterson, Major W. B. Stephenson, Samuel Sutton, George Stephenson, R. H. Smith, Dr. J. T. Hays, Daniel Martin, John M. Cooley,
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): article 3
ur Northern exchanges, received up to Thursday's date, we make up the following extracts, showing the growing feeling in Lincoln's dominions for a speedy and peaceful settlement of the political difficulties which now envelop us: Now the female responsibility. How long these persecutions are to be continued, we cannot imagine; but the public shall know what Lincoln has inaugurated. Peace meeting in Harford county. Pursuant to a published call for the assembling of the peoplehe policy of the Black Republican party, the past as well as the present; could see no difference between John Brown and Lincoln, except that one represented and led on a small force, the other a very large one; wished for a speedy termination of ourtherners who now congregate at Washington. The muddle of the New York press. In an article severely denouncing Lincoln and the course which has characterized his Administration, the Cincinnati Gazette thus concludes: What Administrati
Americans (search for this): article 3
not permitted to take them from the office. "Order truly reigns in Warsaw. Yours respectfully, Sept. 1, 1861. The New York day Book. The proprietors of the New York Day Book have addressed a letter to the Courier des Etats Unis, denying that they have abandoned the position they have hitherto maintained. "The Day Book," they say "has neither interrupted its publication, nor by word or deed taken a position different from what it has preserved up to this moment. As Americans and freemen, its editors are determined to sustain the dignity of the press or perish in its defence." "our situation." Under the above caption the New York National Zeitung (German) thus writes: While the South is from day to day succeeding in throwing off the yoke of military despotism, we at the North have to suffer more from day to day by the iron grasp of the Dictator. --Terrorism against all who do not bear allegiance to the usurper, becomes more rampant every day. Sys
R. H. Smith (search for this): article 3
as the present; could see no difference between John Brown and Lincoln, except that one represented and led on a small force, the other a very large one; wished for a speedy termination of our national difficulties. The Doctor's speech met with a warm reception and much applause. On motion the meeting proceeded to ballot for delegates, when the following gentlemen were declared to be elected: Delegates.--W. A. Patterson, Major W. B. Stephenson, Samuel Sutton, George Stephenson, R. H. Smith, Dr. J. T. Hays, Daniel Martin, John M. Cooley, Dr. J. A. Preston, B. F. Heath. Alternates.--W. B. Michael, James Chesney, Dr. J. K. Sappington, John P. Dallam, Bennett Tilbert, R. Henly, A. Osborn, Thomas Jeffry, James Stephenson. W. Ewing, Jr., was then called for, and responded in a speech of twenty minutes. Spoke of the different branches of the General Government; regarded the Supreme Court as a co-ordinate and not a subordinate branch of the General Government, and, as suc
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