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Henry Palmer (search for this): article 5
by the superstitious Spanish soldiers, happened at the very moment to be constructing fortifications on the Thames, and Winter shrewdly thought that the knowledge of this fact would greatly increase the panic with which it was his project to afflict the Spanish fleet. The plan was adopted and we make some interesting extracts from Motley's History of the United Netherlands, to show with what effect: It was decided that Winter's suggestion should be immediately acted upon, and Sir Henry Palmer was sent in a pinnace to Dover, to bring off a number of old vessels, fit to be fired, together, with a supply of light-wood, rosin, sulphur and other combustibles, most adapted to the purpose. * * * As the twilight deepened, the moon became totally obscured, dark cloud-masses spread over the heavens. At an hour past midnight, it was so dark that it was difficult for the most practiced eye to pierce far into the gloom. But a faint dip of oars now struck the ears of the Spaniards as th
ncible armada." The Italian Gianibelli, who had invented the ships alluded to, and who had ever since been held in holy horror as a devil-dealing wizard, by the superstitious Spanish soldiers, happened at the very moment to be constructing fortifications on the Thames, and Winter shrewdly thought that the knowledge of this fact would greatly increase the panic with which it was his project to afflict the Spanish fleet. The plan was adopted and we make some interesting extracts from Motley's History of the United Netherlands, to show with what effect: It was decided that Winter's suggestion should be immediately acted upon, and Sir Henry Palmer was sent in a pinnace to Dover, to bring off a number of old vessels, fit to be fired, together, with a supply of light-wood, rosin, sulphur and other combustibles, most adapted to the purpose. * * * As the twilight deepened, the moon became totally obscured, dark cloud-masses spread over the heavens. At an hour past midnight, it
Frobisher (search for this): article 5
that every ship, after the danger should be passed, was to return to its post and await his further orders. But it was useless in that moment of unreasoning panic to issue commands. The despised Gianibelli, who had met with so many rebuffs at Philip's court, and who, owing to official incredulity, had been but partially successful in his magnificent enterprise at Antwerp, had now inflicted more damage on Philip's armada than had hitherto been accomplished by Howard and Drake, Hawkins and Frobisher combined. So long as night and darkness lasted, the confusion and uproar continued. When the morning dawned, several of the Spanish vessels lay disabled, while the rest of the fleet was seen at a distance of two leagues from Calais, driving towards the Flemish coast. The author describes vividly the wreck, produced by this expedition of the fireships of the squadron of galeases, "the largest and most splendid vessel in the armada, the show-ship of the fleet, 'the very glory and
as well as might be that every ship, after the danger should be passed, was to return to its post and await his further orders. But it was useless in that moment of unreasoning panic to issue commands. The despised Gianibelli, who had met with so many rebuffs at Philip's court, and who, owing to official incredulity, had been but partially successful in his magnificent enterprise at Antwerp, had now inflicted more damage on Philip's armada than had hitherto been accomplished by Howard and Drake, Hawkins and Frobisher combined. So long as night and darkness lasted, the confusion and uproar continued. When the morning dawned, several of the Spanish vessels lay disabled, while the rest of the fleet was seen at a distance of two leagues from Calais, driving towards the Flemish coast. The author describes vividly the wreck, produced by this expedition of the fireships of the squadron of galeases, "the largest and most splendid vessel in the armada, the show-ship of the fleet,
character were effectively used by the Rhodians in their war with the Syrians, a hundred years before the commencement of the Christian era, according to Livy. The English also employed them in their engagements with the famous Spanish armada, in 1588, and very effectively, too.--Previously, in the course of the long war between Spain and the Netherlands, they were used, with fearful effect, in the defence of the city of Antwerp, to facilitate the capture of which the Duke of Parma constructed e sometimes so arranged as to explode when near, or in contact with the fleet. Grappling irons are sometimes placed upon fireships to enable those navigating them to hook the vessel they would attack, and so secure its destruction. When, in 1588, the much-vaunted Spanish armada came into the British channel for the purpose of invading England and subduing the revolted Netherlands, and was lying in those narrow straits, between Dover and Calais, and along that low, sandy shore--one hundred
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