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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: December 16, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Report of Capt. Wilkes.why he did not seize the Trent. The following is the report of Capt. Wilkes, assigning his reasons for the arrest of Messrs. Mason and Slidell: U. S. Steamer San Jacinto, At Sea, Nov. 16. Sir: --In my dispatch by Commander Taylor I confined myself to the reports of the movement of this ship, and the facts connected with the capture of Messrs. Mason, Slidell, Eustis, and Macfarland, as I intended to write you particularly relative to the reasons which induced my action in making these prisoners. When I heard at Cienfuegos, on the south side of Cuba, of these Commissioners having landed on the Island of Cuba, and that they were at Havana, and would depart in the English steamer of the 7th of November, I determined to intercept them, and carefully examined all the authorities on international law to which I had access, viz: Kent Wheaton, Vattel, besides various decisions of Sir William Scott, and other judges of the Admiralty Court of Great B
Gideon Welles (search for this): article 6
which affected the interests of our country, and interrupted the action of that of the Confederates. I would add that the conduct of H. B. M. 's subjects, both official and others, showed but little regard or obedience to her proclamation, by aiding and abetting the views and endeavoring to conceal the persons of the Commissioners. I have pointed out sufficient reasons to show you that my action in this case was derived from a firm conviction that it became my duty to make these parties prisoners, and to bring them to the United States. Although in my giving up this valuable prize I have deprived the officers and crew of a well-earned reward, I am assured they are quite content to forego any advantages which might have accrued to them under the circumstances. I may add that having assumed the responsibility, I am willing to abide the result. I am, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, Charles Wilkes, Captain. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy.
Macfarland (search for this): article 6
Report of Capt. Wilkes.why he did not seize the Trent. The following is the report of Capt. Wilkes, assigning his reasons for the arrest of Messrs. Mason and Slidell: U. S. Steamer San Jacinto, At Sea, Nov. 16. Sir: --In my dispatch by Commander Taylor I confined myself to the reports of the movement of this ship, and the facts connected with the capture of Messrs. Mason, Slidell, Eustis, and Macfarland, as I intended to write you particularly relative to the reasons which induced my action in making these prisoners. When I heard at Cienfuegos, on the south side of Cuba, of these Commissioners having landed on the Island of Cuba, and that they were at Havana, and would depart in the English steamer of the 7th of November, I determined to intercept them, and carefully examined all the authorities on international law to which I had access, viz: Kent Wheaton, Vattel, besides various decisions of Sir William Scott, and other judges of the Admiralty Court of Great B
Charles Wilkes (search for this): article 6
Report of Capt. Wilkes.why he did not seize the Trent. The following is the report of Capt. Wilkes, assigning his reasons for the arrest of Messrs. Mason and Slidell: U. S. Steamer San Jacinto, At Sea, Nov. 16. Sir: --In my dispatch by Commander Taylor I confined myself to the reports of the movement of this shiCapt. Wilkes, assigning his reasons for the arrest of Messrs. Mason and Slidell: U. S. Steamer San Jacinto, At Sea, Nov. 16. Sir: --In my dispatch by Commander Taylor I confined myself to the reports of the movement of this ship, and the facts connected with the capture of Messrs. Mason, Slidell, Eustis, and Macfarland, as I intended to write you particularly relative to the reasons which induced my action in making these prisoners. When I heard at Cienfuegos, on the south side of Cuba, of these Commissioners having landed on the Island of Cuba, anI am assured they are quite content to forego any advantages which might have accrued to them under the circumstances. I may add that having assumed the responsibility, I am willing to abide the result. I am, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, Charles Wilkes, Captain. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy.
Report of Capt. Wilkes.why he did not seize the Trent. The following is the report of Capt. Wilkes, assigning his reasons for the arrest of Messrs. Mason and Slidell: U. S. Steamer San Jacinto, At Sea, Nov. 16. Sir: --In my dispatch by Commander Taylor I confined myself to the reports of the movement of this ship, and the facts connected with the capture of Messrs. Mason, Slidell, Eustis, and Macfarland, as I intended to write you particularly relative to the reasons which inMessrs. Mason, Slidell, Eustis, and Macfarland, as I intended to write you particularly relative to the reasons which induced my action in making these prisoners. When I heard at Cienfuegos, on the south side of Cuba, of these Commissioners having landed on the Island of Cuba, and that they were at Havana, and would depart in the English steamer of the 7th of November, I determined to intercept them, and carefully examined all the authorities on international law to which I had access, viz: Kent Wheaton, Vattel, besides various decisions of Sir William Scott, and other judges of the Admiralty Court of Great
Nash Taylor (search for this): article 6
Report of Capt. Wilkes.why he did not seize the Trent. The following is the report of Capt. Wilkes, assigning his reasons for the arrest of Messrs. Mason and Slidell: U. S. Steamer San Jacinto, At Sea, Nov. 16. Sir: --In my dispatch by Commander Taylor I confined myself to the reports of the movement of this ship, and the facts connected with the capture of Messrs. Mason, Slidell, Eustis, and Macfarland, as I intended to write you particularly relative to the reasons which induced my action in making these prisoners. When I heard at Cienfuegos, on the south side of Cuba, of these Commissioners having landed on the Island of Cuba, and that they were at Havana, and would depart in the English steamer of the 7th of November, I determined to intercept them, and carefully examined all the authorities on international law to which I had access, viz: Kent Wheaton, Vattel, besides various decisions of Sir William Scott, and other judges of the Admiralty Court of Great B
Report of Capt. Wilkes.why he did not seize the Trent. The following is the report of Capt. Wilkes, assigning his reasons for the arrest of Messrs. Mason and Slidell: U. S. Steamer San Jacinto, At Sea, Nov. 16. Sir: --In my dispatch by Commander Taylor I confined myself to the reports of the movement of this ship, and the facts connected with the capture of Messrs. Mason, Slidell, Eustis, and Macfarland, as I intended to write you particularly relative to the reasons which inSlidell, Eustis, and Macfarland, as I intended to write you particularly relative to the reasons which induced my action in making these prisoners. When I heard at Cienfuegos, on the south side of Cuba, of these Commissioners having landed on the Island of Cuba, and that they were at Havana, and would depart in the English steamer of the 7th of November, I determined to intercept them, and carefully examined all the authorities on international law to which I had access, viz: Kent Wheaton, Vattel, besides various decisions of Sir William Scott, and other judges of the Admiralty Court of Great
William Scott (search for this): article 6
to write you particularly relative to the reasons which induced my action in making these prisoners. When I heard at Cienfuegos, on the south side of Cuba, of these Commissioners having landed on the Island of Cuba, and that they were at Havana, and would depart in the English steamer of the 7th of November, I determined to intercept them, and carefully examined all the authorities on international law to which I had access, viz: Kent Wheaton, Vattel, besides various decisions of Sir William Scott, and other judges of the Admiralty Court of Great Britain, which bore upon the rights of neutrals and their responsibilities. The Governments of Great Britain, France and Spain have issued proclamations that the Confederate States were viewed, considered, and treated as belligerents, and knowing that the ports of Great Britain, France, Spain, and Holland, in the West Indies, were open to their vessels, and that they were admitted to all the courtesies and protection vessels of the
July, 11 AD (search for this): article 6
atch by Commander Taylor I confined myself to the reports of the movement of this ship, and the facts connected with the capture of Messrs. Mason, Slidell, Eustis, and Macfarland, as I intended to write you particularly relative to the reasons which induced my action in making these prisoners. When I heard at Cienfuegos, on the south side of Cuba, of these Commissioners having landed on the Island of Cuba, and that they were at Havana, and would depart in the English steamer of the 7th of November, I determined to intercept them, and carefully examined all the authorities on international law to which I had access, viz: Kent Wheaton, Vattel, besides various decisions of Sir William Scott, and other judges of the Admiralty Court of Great Britain, which bore upon the rights of neutrals and their responsibilities. The Governments of Great Britain, France and Spain have issued proclamations that the Confederate States were viewed, considered, and treated as belligerents, and know
November 16th (search for this): article 6
Report of Capt. Wilkes.why he did not seize the Trent. The following is the report of Capt. Wilkes, assigning his reasons for the arrest of Messrs. Mason and Slidell: U. S. Steamer San Jacinto, At Sea, Nov. 16. Sir: --In my dispatch by Commander Taylor I confined myself to the reports of the movement of this ship, and the facts connected with the capture of Messrs. Mason, Slidell, Eustis, and Macfarland, as I intended to write you particularly relative to the reasons which induced my action in making these prisoners. When I heard at Cienfuegos, on the south side of Cuba, of these Commissioners having landed on the Island of Cuba, and that they were at Havana, and would depart in the English steamer of the 7th of November, I determined to intercept them, and carefully examined all the authorities on international law to which I had access, viz: Kent Wheaton, Vattel, besides various decisions of Sir William Scott, and other judges of the Admiralty Court of Great B
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