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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 9, 1863., [Electronic resource].

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re crazy with delight. They are stalling their Russian ally with sugar plumbs. On Wednesday they took the officers from the Russian frigates in the harbor at New York and carried them to the City Hall, to receive the freedom of the city. The Times thus describes the scene: As soon as the guests and committees were transferred to the carriages the procession moved. The line of march was through 23d street to Fifth avenue, down Fifth avenue to 14th street, through 14th street to Broadway, and down Broadway to City Hall. Throughout the whole distance the windows of buildings on either side of the street, the porches, balconies, and sidewalks, were thronged by citizens and ladies, anxious by their presence to do honor to the distinguished guests who represent among us the sympathies of a friendly Government in Europe. Residences and business establishments were decorated with flags and banners, among which there was a frequent display of the Russian cross. As the proce
o the city. The Russian Naval reception in New York. The Yankees, who are decidedly more exhausted and more in need of "intervention" than the Confederates, have found a foreign friend and are crazy with delight. They are stalling their Russian ally with sugar plumbs. On Wednesday they took the officers from the Russian frigates in the harbor at New York and carried them to the City Hall, to receive the freedom of the city. The Times thus describes the scene: As soon as the gueor of the occasion. In the centre was hung the imperial flag of Russia — the double headed eagle on a yellow ground — and the flag bearing the escutcheon of the city of New York. On either wing was unfurled the Stars and Stripes, and miniature Russian and American flags were displayed in prodigal profusion from other parts of the hall. A platform had been created for the use of the guests in witnessing the review of the troops. Long before the hour for the arrival of the procession
And, if you can find an impressible Copperhead woman, I should paint her in the attitude of reaching him a crash towe] to wipe away his tears. [Loud laughter and applause.] The late Raid on vessels on the Eastern Shore of Virginia. Capt. Townsend, of the schooner David C. Foster, which arrived at New York on Thursday, gives the following account of the capture of vessels in Wachapreague Inlet, on the Eastern Shore of Virginia, a few days since: A party of rebels--twenty-five in upon him, and his courage failing his, he returned. They then shot him and threw him overboard, sinking him with a bar of pig iron. One of the captured crew piloted the vessels out. the crews were all taken, it is supposed, to Richmond. Capt. Townsend, assisted by his crew, got off the schooner Alexander, and she was brought to the city. The Russian Naval reception in New York. The Yankees, who are decidedly more exhausted and more in need of "intervention" than the Confederates, h
he troops excited the admiration of the officers, and the perfect marching of the 7th regiment caused them to applaud the sight. The review concluded, the guests were escorted to the Governor's room, where they were welcomed in a speech by Mayor Opdyke. In response, Admiral Lessofaky said: "Mr. Mayor--Before I reached this place myself and brother officers received the kindest greetings from the people of this city, in the houses and in the streets, and from the troops who have dthe sincere friendship which now unites the two countries; and when we shall leave you it will be with a consciousness of the fact that we are your debtors." Many leading citizens were then introduced to the Admiral and his associates by Mayor Opdyke, after which they appeared on the balcony and were loudly cheered.--This being concluded, they were again escorted to their carriages, and the vast assemblage dispersed. Gen. Gillmore and Admiral Dahlgren. In the Morris Island corresp
Late Northern News.Mr. Vice-President Hamlin on "the Union as it was." It is treason now at the North to wish for "the Union as it was." That article seems to be very far below par. Vice. President Hamlin, in a speech at Philadelphia last week, gave the views of the Administration on the subject: Well, we have a class of men there who very much want "the Constitution as it is and the Union as it was." [Laughter.] Have you got them here? [Cries of "Yes," laughter and cheers.] WellPresident Hamlin, in a speech at Philadelphia last week, gave the views of the Administration on the subject: Well, we have a class of men there who very much want "the Constitution as it is and the Union as it was." [Laughter.] Have you got them here? [Cries of "Yes," laughter and cheers.] Well, sir, I have found them all round. I am very sorry, indeed that they cannot have it. [Laughter.] There is no possible way in which they can have it. Why, it is mere demagogues; it is the merest clap-trap, it is nonsense, and not very good nonsense at that. [Laughter and cheers.] "The Union as it was!" That means to bring back the States in precisely the same condition they were in when the rebellion was inaugurated. How are you going to get Missouri back so? The people of that State have, u
o'clock. The guests having alighted and taken their positions on the platform, the military passed in marching review through the Park from the east to the west. The fine appearance of the troops excited the admiration of the officers, and the perfect marching of the 7th regiment caused them to applaud the sight. The review concluded, the guests were escorted to the Governor's room, where they were welcomed in a speech by Mayor Opdyke. In response, Admiral Lessofaky said: "Mr. Mayor--Before I reached this place myself and brother officers received the kindest greetings from the people of this city, in the houses and in the streets, and from the troops who have done us the honor to appear on the occasion of our visit; and certainly the kind words that you have addressed us make it my duty to make known the reception that has been given us by the American people. At home they will rejoice at this manifestation. It will be but another evidence that will add to their f
Lessofaky (search for this): article 1
the procession arrived at 3 o'clock. The guests having alighted and taken their positions on the platform, the military passed in marching review through the Park from the east to the west. The fine appearance of the troops excited the admiration of the officers, and the perfect marching of the 7th regiment caused them to applaud the sight. The review concluded, the guests were escorted to the Governor's room, where they were welcomed in a speech by Mayor Opdyke. In response, Admiral Lessofaky said: "Mr. Mayor--Before I reached this place myself and brother officers received the kindest greetings from the people of this city, in the houses and in the streets, and from the troops who have done us the honor to appear on the occasion of our visit; and certainly the kind words that you have addressed us make it my duty to make known the reception that has been given us by the American people. At home they will rejoice at this manifestation. It will be but another eviden
Russia (Russia) (search for this): article 1
nd banners, among which there was a frequent display of the Russian cross. As the procession moved past handkerchiefs were waved by the fair ones of our city, while cheers went up from our men and youth. All vied in the effort to indicate how deep and earnest was the welcome tendered to our guests. At Madison square and Union square salutes were fired as the procession passed. The City Hall was tastefully decorated in honor of the occasion. In the centre was hung the imperial flag of Russia — the double headed eagle on a yellow ground — and the flag bearing the escutcheon of the city of New York. On either wing was unfurled the Stars and Stripes, and miniature Russian and American flags were displayed in prodigal profusion from other parts of the hall. A platform had been created for the use of the guests in witnessing the review of the troops. Long before the hour for the arrival of the procession the Park was thronged with people to witness the grand pageant. At l
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 1
e? [Cries of "Yes," laughter and cheers.] Well, sir, I have found them all round. I am very sorry, indeed that they cannot have it. [Laughter.] There is no possible way in which they can have it. Why, it is mere demagogues; it is the merest clap-trap, it is nonsense, and not very good nonsense at that. [Laughter and cheers.] "The Union as it was!" That means to bring back the States in precisely the same condition they were in when the rebellion was inaugurated. How are you going to get Missouri back so? The people of that State have, unsolicited and uninterfered with by any power, inaugurated a system of measures for the emancipation of slaves. How are you going to get it back as it was? These people want to have the Union as it was! And what are you going to do with that little State nestled in Western Virginia, formed by loyal men, which has adopted a series of measures to rid itself of slavery? How are you to get it back as it was, I should like to know? [Cheers.] I know
New York (New York, United States) (search for this): article 1
s of measures to rid itself of slavery? How are you to get it back as it was, I should like to know? [Cheers.] I know they mourn over it, and regret their inability to bring back the Union as it was. Now if there are any men in your goodly city of New York who have any tears to shed over such a result, I am half inclined to think they must be crocodile tears, --but if they are not and you have got those who have tears to shed for "the Union as it was"--I think it would form a good subject for ired as the procession passed. The City Hall was tastefully decorated in honor of the occasion. In the centre was hung the imperial flag of Russia — the double headed eagle on a yellow ground — and the flag bearing the escutcheon of the city of New York. On either wing was unfurled the Stars and Stripes, and miniature Russian and American flags were displayed in prodigal profusion from other parts of the hall. A platform had been created for the use of the guests in witnessing the rev
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