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Browsing named entities in a specific section of An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps.. Search the whole document.

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West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
annock rivers was selected by him as our point of defence; while Beauregard preferred Manassas and Bull Run-much inferior situations, although accidental victory crowned our efforts and immortalized the latter place. The defeat of Pegram in Western Virginia by McClellan and Rosecrans, at Rich Mountain, occurred before Manassas, as I have mentioned in another place. A few weeks after the Yankee rout at Manassas, Lee was sent to Western Virginia, with only a few raw recruits, under Wise and FWestern Virginia, with only a few raw recruits, under Wise and Floyd, to contend against the numerous and well-provided thousands who flocked to the Federal standard from Ohio and other adjacent States, having canal and railroad communication beyond all their necessities. What Lee needed in men he made up by skilful manoeuvres, and by well fortifying different mountain passes and important hills. It was said, be cause he did not fight, that he was afraid, that he was one of the old school, etc. The truth is, he did not dare to fight, exception very advanta
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
annon and stores of all kinds; but while our ports were blockaded, it was sheer madness to incur vast expense in keeping open naval establishments and depots when all our small craft were blocked up in harbors. This' should have been done at first. Ours was a defensive war even upon land; it could not be otherwise on water. It is true that our infant navy achieved great glory in its encounter with the United States vessels, and the names of the Merrimac, Manassas, Arkansas,. Sumter, and Nashville can never be forgotten; and it is doubtful whether any navy in the world did so much with such indifferent resources, While Huger was preparing to evacuate Norfolk, most of our troops were retracing their steps up the peninsula towards Richmond, and not one brigade was unnecessarily detained at Yorktown. General D. H. Hill commanded Yorktown and the left wing; Magruder the right; Longstreet the centre; while Johnston was chief over all. Many episodes and incidents worthy of remembrance da
Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
uch inferior situations, although accidental victory crowned our efforts and immortalized the latter place. The defeat of Pegram in Western Virginia by McClellan and Rosecrans, at Rich Mountain, occurred before Manassas, as I have mentioned in another place. A few weeks after the Yankee rout at Manassas, Lee was sent to Western Virginia, with only a few raw recruits, under Wise and Floyd, to contend against the numerous and well-provided thousands who flocked to the Federal standard from Ohio and other adjacent States, having canal and railroad communication beyond all their necessities. What Lee needed in men he made up by skilful manoeuvres, and by well fortifying different mountain passes and important hills. It was said, be cause he did not fight, that he was afraid, that he was one of the old school, etc. The truth is, he did not dare to fight, exception very advantageous terms, which Rosecrans was too much of an officer to grant. There was no excuse for the latter not off
Vermont (Vermont, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
s from the mud. This affair lasted about half an hour; the enemy numbered near two thousand, While our force did not exceed half that number. The scene of carnage was frightful; several hundreds of the enemy might be seen lying in all directions in the battery, many along the causeway, and more to the right and left of it in the swamp. Our loss was unaccountably small, and never did Louisianians use the bayonet with greater good will, for they had met for the first time real Yankees, (Vermont,) who had done more lying and boasting than those of any State in the North-always excepting the arch-hypocrites and negro-worshippers of Massachusetts. Proud as were our men of this affair, all regretted one thing, namely, that the gentlemen in blue had not proved to be Massachusetts men. There was not a regiment in the service but would have willingly marched fifty miles for a fair fight with double the number of them. Smith, the Federal Commander, kept up the cannonade till long af
Manassas, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
to move on the Upper Potomac in march McClellan prepares to flank Manassas by marching heavy masses up the Shenandoah Valley, and crossing th cautiously. General ( Stonewall ) Jackson had been detached from Manassas before Christmas, with about three thousand men, which, together wtly maturing plans for the surprise and capture of Centreville and Manassas, when Johnston suddenly gave orders for a general retreat, and allelected by him as our point of defence; while Beauregard preferred Manassas and Bull Run-much inferior situations, although accidental victoryinia by McClellan and Rosecrans, at Rich Mountain, occurred before Manassas, as I have mentioned in another place. A few weeks after the Yankee rout at Manassas, Lee was sent to Western Virginia, with only a few raw recruits, under Wise and Floyd, to contend against the numerous ter with the United States vessels, and the names of the Merrimac, Manassas, Arkansas,. Sumter, and Nashville can never be forgotten; and it i
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
Ferry to within a few miles of Drainsville, effectually destroying immense stacks of wheat, straw, hay, clover, etc., so that when our force arrived on a neighboring hill, the scene was like a grand illumination, for many miles. The Yankees in Maryland and from Sugar-Loaf Observatory could not understand it at all, and their telegraph lights and rockets were working in all directions: It is true enough that much property was thus destroyed which did not belong to us; but we had previously offefulness of their dogs saved them on many occasions from loss, for the animals would howl and retire from any one unless dressed in blue. As woodsmen, the enemy were complete novices compared to us; but this was as might be expected. There were Maryland regiments; however, in their service who were equal to us, but these were not trusted-McClellan thought, and wisely, that with the first opportunity they would skedaddle to the rebels! Our various batteries commanding the dams seemed to give t
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
t and little matters. Not that our army was absolutely without order previously, but there now seemed to be more of intellect displayed in the movements, and results were effected with less noise and bluster than formerly. Of the fortifications at Yorktown and elsewhere on the peninsula, it is desirable to say a few words, otherwise it will be impossible to understand the movements that occurred there. The occupation of Hampton Roads by large fleets, and the menacing appearance of Fortress Monroe, with its immense number of troops and munitions of war, rendered it necessary for some force to watch the peninsula. This duty was assigned to General Magruder, who often ventured to the vicinity of Newport News, (the most southern point of the peninsula,) and greatly annoyed General Butler, who then commanded the fortress. Butler was tempted to open the campaign of 1861 before Scott, by marching upon Magruder in the hope of overwhelming him. Having made his preparations, he found th
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
nians use the bayonet with greater good will, for they had met for the first time real Yankees, (Vermont,) who had done more lying and boasting than those of any State in the North-always excepting the arch-hypocrites and negro-worshippers of Massachusetts. Proud as were our men of this affair, all regretted one thing, namely, that the gentlemen in blue had not proved to be Massachusetts men. There was not a regiment in the service but would have willingly marched fifty miles for a fair fightMassachusetts men. There was not a regiment in the service but would have willingly marched fifty miles for a fair fight with double the number of them. Smith, the Federal Commander, kept up the cannonade till long after sundown, but with more destruction to his own wounded than to us; for as we screened ourselves during the fire, it did not cause us the loss of a man. This conduct, if nothing more were added, affords ample justification for the assertions of the enemy that their commander was completely intoxicated during the whole affair, and incapable of conducting it. During the night we endeavored to ex
Rapidan (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
es to his native State. His patrimony was situated on Arlington Heights, overlooking Washington, and he knew every inch of the ground and all its capabilities. He had indeed occupied it with a small force, but was ordered to fall back to Fairfax Court-House by the Minister of War. He was the only man capable of filling the seat of Minister of War, and, upon going to Richmond, was installed in that office, and fulfilled its Herculean duties with great talent and despatch. The line of the Rapidan and Rappahannock rivers was selected by him as our point of defence; while Beauregard preferred Manassas and Bull Run-much inferior situations, although accidental victory crowned our efforts and immortalized the latter place. The defeat of Pegram in Western Virginia by McClellan and Rosecrans, at Rich Mountain, occurred before Manassas, as I have mentioned in another place. A few weeks after the Yankee rout at Manassas, Lee was sent to Western Virginia, with only a few raw recruits, u
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
school, etc. The truth is, he did not dare to fight, exception very advantageous terms, which Rosecrans was too much of an officer to grant. There was no excuse for the latter not offering or seeking battle, for his force — was large and superabundantly supplied. Lee, however completely foiled him on every occasion; and thus' the time passed, until the fall of heavy snows completely blocked up the roads, and rendered all that mountainous region an inhospitable waste. As Charleston (South-Carolina) was threatened, Lee left the care of his troops to Floyd, and took command there, putting the coasts and harbors in complete defence, and rendering his work almost impregnable. The extensive works, however, which he had planned for the defence of Richmond and its vicinity, occupied much of his time, and when our winter quarters broke up the army were, for the most part, gratified by the announcement that he had been selected by Government for the post of commander in-chief. Those who
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