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Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
Potomac, to go southwestward into the interior of Virginia, at the distance of twenty-five miles, found the Mestly the strategic point for the defence of Northeastern Virginia. It was at a convenient distance from the P Jackson, in reference to his native region, Northwestern Virginia. The communications of all the region betweStates of the Northwest than with the remainder of Virginia. A large portion of the population was, moreover, prevailing there, was rather that of Ohio than of Virginia. To the military invasions of the enemy it lay coon as he, not content with the occupation of Northwestern Virginia, sought to invade the central parts of the Sand its supplies. The obvious military policy for Virginia, therefore, was to make no attempt to hold the Norhe enemy, a most important part of central and northern Virginia, the counties of the lower Valley, and of the umerous race — everywhere stanch in its loyalty to Virginia, and wielding the wealth and influence of the dist
Alleghany Mountains (United States) (search for this): chapter 8
f confronted by a force of fourfold numbers and resources, under General McClellan. On the 11th of July, the little army, indiscreetly divided into two detachments, was assailed at Rich Mountain. Both parts were compelled to retreat across the Alleghanies with the loss of their baggage and a number of prisoners, and, at the skirmish at Cannock's Ford, their unfortunate leader was killed. It was this easy triumph which procured for General McClellan, from the Yankee people, the title of The s base, push his powerful corps, by the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, direct to the Ohio River; and that thence he should cut off the retreat of General Rosecranz and his whole force, whom General Lee had drawn far eastward into the gorges of the Alleghanies. The capture of the larger part of the Federal army, and the deliverance of the country, he thought, could hardly fail to reward the prompt execution of this project. But it was not brought to the test of experiment. The fine army of Nort
Department de Ville de Paris (France) (search for this): chapter 8
s now attacked by overwhelming numbers; the commanding general hopes that his troops will step out like men, and make a forced march to save the country. At these nervous words, every countenance brightened with joy, and the army rent the air with their shouts. They hurried forward, often at a double-quick, waded the Shenandoah River, which was waist-deep to the men, ascended the Blue Ridge at Ashby's Gap, and, two hours after midnight, paused for a few hours' rest at the little village of Paris, upon the eastern slope of the mountain. Here General Jackson turned his brigade into an enclosure occupied by a beautiful grove, and the wearied men fell prostrate upon the earth without food. In a little time an officer came to Jackson, reminded him that there were no sentries posted around his bivouac, while the men were all .wrapped in sleep, and asked if some should be aroused, and a guard set. No, replied Jackson, let the poor fellows sleep; I will guard the camp myself. All the rem
Cincinnati (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
with the remainder of Virginia. A large portion of the population was, moreover, from this cause, disaffected. The type of sentiment and manners prevailing there, was rather that of Ohio than of Virginia. To the military invasions of the enemy it lay completely open, while direct access from the central parts of the Confederacy could only be had by a tedious journey over mountain roads. The western border is washed by the Ohio River, which floats the mammoth steamboats of Pittsburg and Cincinnati, save during the summer-heats. The Monongahela, a navigable stream, pierces its northern boundary. The district is embraced between the most populous and fanatical parts of the States of Ohio and Pennsylvania. Two railroads from the Ohio eastward, uniting at Grafton, enabled the Federalists to pour their troops and their munitions of war, with rapidity, into the heart of the country. The Confederate authorities, on the contrary, had neither navigable river nor railroad by which to tran
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
Black Republicans had impelled them to adopt it, but it was a confessed novelty; and with all their heat, there was no solid assurance of its success. The triumphs of the patriots against it would have taught multitudes to reconsider the rash and bloody experiment, and to return, though with reluctance, to the creed which founded the Union on the consent of the sovereign States. But especially were decisive results at the outset important to determine the wavering judgments of Maryland, Kentucky, and Missouri. The occupation of Washington would have transferred the former of these States from the Northern to the Southern side, and have united the divided allegiance of the other two; and such a change in the balance of strength, would have decided the whole subsequent success, had the North thereafter endeavored to continue the struggle. With these views of the campaign, General Jackson earnestly concurred. His sense of official propriety sealed his lips; and, when the more im
Bath County (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
ve in any capacity under General Garnett, then commanding there. After that unfortunate commander was killed, and his army expelled from the country, the Confederate Government sent out from Staunton a much more powerful expedition, under General Robert E. Lee. This commander endeavored to shorten the arduous line of communication over the mountain roads, by leaving the Central Virginia Railroad, at a point forty miles west of Staunton, and penetrating the northwest through the counties of Bath and Pochahontas at the Valley Mountain. But the intrinsic difficulties of his line, aggravated by a season of unusual rains, robbed him of solid success. From his great reputation, and the fine force entrusted to him, brilliant results were expected. In this hope General Jackson concurred. He wrote, August 15th, to his wife:--General Lee has recently gone west, and I hope that we will soon hear that our God has again crowned our arms with victory. . .. If General Lee remains in the Northw
Manassa (Colorado, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
neral Beauregard. The traveller who left the town of Alexandria, upon the Potomac, to go southwestward into the interior of Virginia, at the distance of twenty-five miles, found the Manassas Gap Railroad dividing itself on the right hand from the main stem, and turning westward towards the peaks of the Blue Ridge, which are visible in the horizon. This road sought a passage through those mountains at Manassa's Gap, a depression which received its name from an obscure Jew merchant named Manassa, who, years ago, had fixed his home in the gorge of the ravine. From this the railroad was called the Manassa's Gap Road, and the junction with the Alexandria Railroad the Manassa's Junction. Thus the name of an insignificant Israelite has associated itself with a spot, which will never cease to be remembered, while liberty and heroism have votaries in the world. This Junction was manifestly the strategic point for the defence of Northeastern Virginia. It was at a convenient distance fr
France (France) (search for this): chapter 8
se could, for a moment, doubt that this much-ado-about-nothing would end in a month. The Northern people were simply invincible. The rebels, a mere band of ragamuffins, will fly, like chaff before the wind, on our approach. But who can wonder that the press of America should pander thus to the ignorance and the arrogance of the North, when Seward himself, just a month before the Battle of Manassas, wrote thus in a public document, addressed to Mr. Dayton, the Minister at the French Court: France seems to have mistaken a mere casual and ephemeral insurrection here, such as is incidental in the experience of all nations, for a war, which has flagrantly separated this nation into two co-existing political powers, who are contending in arms against each other, after the separation. And again: It is erroneous to suppose that any war exists in the United States. Certainly there cannot be two belligerent powers, where there is no war. Read in the light of subsequent events, can anything
Wheeling, W. Va. (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
t of the eminence had now continued three hours, and was evidently approaching its crisis. Both of Jackson's flanks were threatened. Upon his front the enemy was pressing with overwhelming numbers; the ammunition and the strength of his cannoneers were failing together; and the red cloud of dust, in which the advancing line of the Federalists shrouded itself, was rolling perilously near to his batteries. Jackson saw that the moment had come to appeal to his supreme arbiter, the bayonet. Wheeling his guns suddenly to the rear by his right and left, he cleared away the arena before his regiments, and gave them all the signal. Riding up to the 2d regiment, he cried, Reserve your fire till they come within fifty yards, then fire and give them the bayonet; and, when you charge, yell like furies! Like noble hounds unleashed, his men sprang to their feet, concentrating into that moment all the pent — up energies and revenge of the hours of passive suffering, delivered one deadly volley,
Staunton, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
or railroad by which to transport their troops, or to subsist them there, but could only effect this by a long wagon-road crossing numerous mountain-ridges from Staunton, upon the Central Virginia Railroad. It was manifest, therefore, that the Government had little prospect of being able to cope with the Federalists for the occual Garnett, then commanding there. After that unfortunate commander was killed, and his army expelled from the country, the Confederate Government sent out from Staunton a much more powerful expedition, under General Robert E. Lee. This commander endeavored to shorten the arduous line of communication over the mountain roads, by leaving the Central Virginia Railroad, at a point forty miles west of Staunton, and penetrating the northwest through the counties of Bath and Pochahontas at the Valley Mountain. But the intrinsic difficulties of his line, aggravated by a season of unusual rains, robbed him of solid success. From his great reputation, and the
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