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England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 7
t in England is felt wherever English is spoken. We may have declared political independence, but while we speak our mother-tongue, the sceptre of intellect can never depart from Judah,--the mind of America must ever be, to a great extent, the vassal of England. Two stars keep not their motion in one sphere, and whoever hangs with rapture over Shakspeare, kindles with Sidney and Milton, or prays in the idiom of the English Bible, London legislates for him. [Cheers.] When, therefore, Great Britain abolished slavery in the West Indies, she settled the policy of every land which the Saxon race rules; for all such, the question is now only one of time. Every word, therefore, that our friend has spoken for the slave at home, instead of losing power has gained it from the position he occupied, since he was pouring the waters of life into the very fountainhead of our literature. Neither have his labors in behalf of other reforms been so much lost to the slave. The cause of tyrants
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
e moved in the best society! Could he but have chanced to be born in Ireland, and have early contracted the habit of kissing the Blarney stone of every nation, instead of shivering here beneath that North Star,--which South Carolina, it is said, intends to forbid her pilots to steer by, it is so incendiary a twinkler! [laughter and cheers]instead of this, he could repose his wearied virtue -- Where the gentle south wind lingers, 'Mid Carolina's pines; Or falls the careless sunbeam Down Georgia's golden mines. I come to-night from that little family party of the Curtises, the slave-catchers' meeting in Faneuil Hall, and am exceedingly glad to be able to inform you that our ever-active [!] Mayor has been able, quite contrary to his expectations, to keep the peace there to-night. [Laughter.] I was much pleased, even in that gathering, to witness the unconscious effect of our agitation. In the first place it is considered a settled thing that the Union is in danger! Nothing le
Lisbon, Grafton County, New Hampshire (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ore, in what part of the Lord's harvest-field our friend has been toiling: whether his voice cheered the starving Hindoo crushed beneath British selfishness, or Hungary battling against treason and the Czar; whether he pleaded at home for bread and the ballot, or held up with his sympathy the ever-hopeful enthusiasm of Ireland,--every true word spoken for suffering man, is so much done for the negro bending beneath the weight of American bondage. [Cheers.] It is said that the earthquake of Lisbon tossed the sea in billows on the coast of Cuba; so no indignant heart is beating anywhere whose pulses are not felt on the walls of our American Bastile. [Cheers.] When, therefore, we recount to Mr. Thompson our success and marvellous progress, we are but returning to him the talent he committed to our trust; not only in that for many of us his eloquence breathed into our souls the breath of Antislavery life, but inasmuch, also, as we have been aware, with the Roman consul whom the gods aid
Concord (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
his own party that hardly enough were left to count them. [Cheers.] Now, at least, the question is settled where Massachusetts stands; so unequivocally, that even the Daily Advertiser, which never announced the nomination of Horace Mann until after he was elected [cheers and laughter], even that late riser may be considered posted on this point. I remember Mr. Webster once said, in reply to some taunt of Hayne's, There is Massachusetts! Behold her, and judge for yourselves! There is Concord and Lexington and Bunker Hill, and there they will remain forever. Let us borrow the formula, and when anybody in the United States Senate doubts our position, let us cry, There is Massachusetts! Behold her, and judge for yourselves! There is George Thompson, welcomed by the heart, if he could not be by the pocket of the Commonwealth. [Cheers.] There is Horace Mann in, and Charles W. Upham out, and there they will remain forever. [Cheers.] There is George S. Boutwell in, and George N.
Brazil (Brazil) (search for this): chapter 7
d that we are called to put implicit confidence in the peculiarly conscientious and striking reluctance of slaveholders to trespass on the rights of others, that this loose law, this wide-open gate for avarice and perjury, shall never be abused! And, further still, we are told not to be anxious about the checks and safeguards of jury trial; since, when such unfortunates reach Charleston or New Orleans,--and, by the way, what bond is taken that they ever shall, and not be carried to Cuba or Brazil first?--they, the mistakenly kidnapped citizens of the Commonwealth, shall have all the blessed privileges of a jury trial that the slaves of that paradise enjoy! We ask bread,--a freeman's jury trial (a matter of right, not of favor), by his peers in the neighborhood, with a witness-box open to all men, white or black, and the burden of proof on the claimant to show his title. Our statesmen (!) offer us a stone,--the slave's jury trial (not a matter of right, but granted when he finds som
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 7
.] Our welcome to George Thompson to-night is only the joy we have in grasping his hand, and seeing him with our own eyes. But we do not feel that, for the last fifteen years, he has been absent from us, much less from the battle to whose New England phalanx we welcome him to-night. Every blow struck for the right in England is felt wherever English is spoken. We may have declared political independence, but while we speak our mother-tongue, the sceptre of intellect can never depart froo superficial structure like the Capitol at Washington, which man put up and man can pull down again. It is an oak, striking its roots through the strata of a thousand customs; to uproot it would shake the continent. It is the granite of the New England formation, basing itself in the central depths, peering to heaven through the tops of our mountains, and bearing on its ample sides the laughing prosperity of the land. The wind of the blow that shall be aimed at free speech will strike the U
Cuba (Cuba) (search for this): chapter 7
weight of American bondage. [Cheers.] It is said that the earthquake of Lisbon tossed the sea in billows on the coast of Cuba; so no indignant heart is beating anywhere whose pulses are not felt on the walls of our American Bastile. [Cheers.] Whensaid in his speech at Faneuil Hall, If the philanthropist wishes to say anything about slavery, let him strike his blow in Cuba, let him strike it below the line, let him go where the stars and stripes do not wave over it. Is there not a story of onre be such a story, is not the advice of the eloquent gentleman flat plagiarism? Besides, George Thompson has come to his Cuba, come where his stars and stripes [The Union Jack] do not wave, and yet the Choates of the island do not seem to agree witrtunates reach Charleston or New Orleans,--and, by the way, what bond is taken that they ever shall, and not be carried to Cuba or Brazil first?--they, the mistakenly kidnapped citizens of the Commonwealth, shall have all the blessed privileges of a
West Indies (search for this): chapter 7
is spoken. We may have declared political independence, but while we speak our mother-tongue, the sceptre of intellect can never depart from Judah,--the mind of America must ever be, to a great extent, the vassal of England. Two stars keep not their motion in one sphere, and whoever hangs with rapture over Shakspeare, kindles with Sidney and Milton, or prays in the idiom of the English Bible, London legislates for him. [Cheers.] When, therefore, Great Britain abolished slavery in the West Indies, she settled the policy of every land which the Saxon race rules; for all such, the question is now only one of time. Every word, therefore, that our friend has spoken for the slave at home, instead of losing power has gained it from the position he occupied, since he was pouring the waters of life into the very fountainhead of our literature. Neither have his labors in behalf of other reforms been so much lost to the slave. The cause of tyrants is one the world over [cheers], and th
Lynn (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
Welcome to George Thompson (1840). A reception to George Thompson, in Faneuil Hall, November 15, 1850, was broken up by an angry mob. The meeting was therefore adjourned to Worcester, and supplemented by other meetings in several cities. At the reception in Lynn, November 26, 1850, Mr. Phillips delivered the following speech:-- This is certainly, fellow-citizens, a glad sight for my eloquent friend to look upon; these enthusiastic crowds, pressing to extend to him a welcome, and do their part in atonement for the scenes of 1835, and to convince him that even now, not as Boston speaks so speaks the State [cheers]; and yet, it is not in our power, my friends, with all our numbers or zeal, to tender to our guest so real, so impressive a compliment as that with which Faneuil Hall flattered him, the 15th day of this month. Indignation, it has been well said, is itself flavored with a season of compliment. How potent has a man a right to consider his voice, when a whole nation ri
cried out, True, I'll go right home and reform my brother Bill! and if there be such a story, is not the advice of the eloquent gentleman flat plagiarism? Besides, George Thompson has come to his Cuba, come where his stars and stripes [The Union Jack] do not wave, and yet the Choates of the island do not seem to agree with their Boston relative, that this is his appropriate sphere! Ah, the evil is not that he takes sides; it is that he takes the wrong side! [Cheers.] How much better Father Mathew played his cards! Mr. Thompson comes here for the benefit of his health. In Italy invalids are always recommended to secure the southerly side of the house. Mistaken man! how wild in him, an invalid, to take so Northerly a view of this great question! [Cheers.] But for this, like the pliant Irishman, he might have moved in the best society! Could he but have chanced to be born in Ireland, and have early contracted the habit of kissing the Blarney stone of every nation, instead of
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