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By Hill, Dickinson & Co., Auctioneers. Receiver's Sale of negroes.--In pursuance of an order of the District Court of the Confederate States for the Eastern District of Virginia, made on the 10th day of August, 1864, in the matter of L. J. Bowden, an alien enemy, dec'd, I shall sell at public auction, for cash, at the auction store of Messrs. Hill, Dickinson & Co., in the city of Richmond, on Wednesday, the 17th day of August, instant, at ten o'clock A. M., the following Slaves, to wit: Alice Johnson, a negro woman, aged twenty-two years. James, son of Alice, aged three years. Cloe Green, a negro woman, aged thirty-two years. Mary, child of Cloe, aged ten years. Levi, child of Cloc, aged eight years. Franklin, child of Cloe, aged six years. Ben, child of Cloe, aged four years. Nellie Redman, aged thirty-two years. Delphi, child of Nellie, aged nine years. Henry L. Brooke, Receiver, District No. 3. Hill, Dickinson & Co., Auctioneers. au 11--tds
By Hill, Dickinson & Co., Auctioneers. Receiver's Sale of Negroes.--In pursuance of an order of the District Court of the Confederate States for the Eastern District of Virginia, made on the 10th day of August, 1864, in the matter of L. J. Bowden, an alien enemy, dec'd, I shall sell at public auction, for cash, at the auction store of Messrs. Hill, Dickinson & Co., in the city of Richmond, on Wednesday, the 17th day of August, instant, at ten o'clock A. M., the following Slaves, to wit: Alice Johnson, a negro woman, aged twenty-two years: James, son of Alice, aged three years. Cloe Green, a negro woman, aged thirty-two years. Mary, child of Cloe, aged ten years. Levi, child of Cloe, aged eight years. Franklin, child of Cloe, aged six years. Ben, child of Cloe, aged four years. Nellie Redman, aged thirty-two years. Delphi, child of Nellie, aged nine years. Henry L. Brooke, Receiver, District No. 3. Hill, Dickinson & Co., Auctioneers
By Hill, Dickinson & Co., Auctioneers. Receiver's Sale of Negroes.--In pursuance of an order of the District Court of the Confederate States for the Eastern District of Virginia, made on the 10th day of August, 1864, in the matter of L. J. Bowden, an alien enemy, dec'd, I shall sell at public auction, for cash, at the auction store of Messrs. Hill, Dickinson & Co., in the city of Richmond, on Wednesday, the 17th day of August, instant, at ten o'clock A. M., the following Slaves, to wit: Alice Johnson, a negro woman, aged twenty-two years. James, son of Alice, aged three years. Cloe Green, a negro woman, aged thirty-two years. Mary, child of Cloe, aged ten years. Levi, child of Cloe, aged eight years. Franklin, child of Cloe, aged six years. Ben, child of Cloe, aged four years. Nellie Redman, aged thirty-two years. Delphi, child of Nellie, aged nine years. Henry L. Brooke, Receiver, District No. 3. Hill, Dickinson & Co., Auctioneers
The track has since been repaired, but trains are not allowed to run in consequence of the proximity of the enemy. Unusual quietude prevailed yesterday and to-day along the lines. The enemy's artillery is remarkably quick, which is generally attributed to a scarcity of ammunition, caused by the interruption of his communications. But few shells were thrown into the city last night. One set fire to a frame house in Peachtree street. Loss small. [Second Dispatch.] Atlanta, August 17. --The enemy's cavalry have retired from the vicinity of Fairburn, a portion crossing the river near Campbelton. Trains are running as usual. The enemy is busily engaged fortifying on the north side of the Chattahoochee, principally along Powder Springs and Campbelton roads, in the vicinity of Sweet Waters Everything is remarkably quiet along the front. The enemy opened fire upon the city from another gun, supposed to be a 64-pounder, planted on the Marietta road. A slow fire
The Daily Dispatch: August 18, 1864., [Electronic resource], Ran away from my farm, at the Half-way House (search)
From Petersburg. Petersburg, August 17. --Deserters and prisoners brought in to-day concur in the statement that Burnside's and Warren's corps are still in our front here, whilst Hancock's, (Second), and perhaps other infantry, are now operating on the north side of James river. Advices received at headquarters here confirm the defeat of the enemy in the fight yesterday, near White's Tavern, on the north side of James river. Our loss was not very large. Among our losses were Generals Girardey and Chambliss, killed. The fight is supposed to have been renewed, to some extent, to-day, firing being heard in that direction. Official advices from the Valley Department were received at these headquarters up to yesterday. Up to that time no general engagement had taken place. In front of this place nothing of interest is transpiring. Rain has fallen every day this week, which is most grateful to man and beast.
From Mississippi. Meridian, August 17. --Forrest still maintains his position near Abbeville. There has been no forward demonstration of the enemy reported. The Yankees are committing many outrages on the people, peaceable citizens being killed. Governor Clarke called every able-bodied man to assist in driving the enemy back.
From Mobile. Mobile, August 17. --Major-General Frank Gardner assumed command of the District of the Gailf to-day. The people are pleased with him. Yesterday evening the enemy landed at Montrose in five launches. Our cavalry fired on them and killed two and wounded several. The enemy retired last night. Major Carroll, agent of exchange, returned from the Federal fleet after sending off letters and packages to Dauphin Island prisoners. Hopes are entertained of their early exchange. A force of the enemy from Pensacola, estimated at two thousand, crossed the Perdido river yesterday, advancing towards Mobile bay. All quiet in the bay.
the above vessels were put on board the Sophia, the Tallahassee sunk four other schooners, one of which was the J. H. Aowen, of Gloucester. The smoke of the steamer was seen this morning in the direction of Seal island. Thomaston, Maine, August 17.--The rebel steamer Tallahassee on Thursday destroyed twenty-five vessels off Mattinicus Rock. She was manned mostly by Nova Scotia men. After sending the crews and passengers of the vessels destroyed into Friendship by a small craft, she steered in an easterly direction. Boston, August 17.--A dispatch from the American Consular Agent at Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, to this city, states that six more vessels were destroyed by the pirate Tallahassee on Monday, six miles from Cape Sable. Thirty men of the crews were landed at Yarmouth in a destitute condition. The pirate was in sight on Monday morning. A raid into Illinois--five steamers captured and Bonded. Cairo, August 15. --About five hundred rebel cavalry, under C
The Daily Dispatch: August 24, 1864., [Electronic resource], The late campaign on the North side of the James. (search)
ut with great slaughter, the poor deluded black being the chief sufferer. In our front the fighting amounted to nothing more than very heavy skirmishing and an extremely unpleasant shelling from land batteries, gunboats, &c. At one time during the day it became necessary to move one of our guns some distance "by hand" and in the very teeth of the enemy; This was done under a terrible musketry fire, during which privates M. H. Gardner and William M. Mann fell, both painfully wounded. August 17th--All quiet to-day. August 18th--Our troops on the left made a reconnaissance in force, the which amounted to finding the enemy still in force and strongly entrenched. --Shelling and skirmishing passed up and down the lines, but none of our company were hurt. August 19th and 20th.--Our skirmishers have become quite amicable with the enemy's sharpshooters, and everything is quiet. Sunday, August 21st.--The enemy have all returned to the south side after having accomplished —
Mayor's Court. --The Mayor resumed his seat, yesterday morning, after an absence from the city of several weeks on a health-recruiting tour to the Virginia springs. The following business was disposed of: Nicholas Carroll was charged with cheating and defrauding Mrs. Julia A. Farris out of one hundred and seventy dollars and fifty cents. From the statement made by Mrs. Farris, it appears that lady broke up housekeeping about the 17th of August, and went to Carroll's restaurant, on Main street, where she was to receive two hundred dollars per month and board for the services of herself, son and servants. After she had been there a few days the prisoner borrowed two hundred and thirty dollars from her, upon the promise to return it next day; falling to do so, she called on him for it, but could not get it, and after urgent protestations on her part that she needed the money, and did not care about any other acknowledgment of the debt, she finally consented to indulge him ti
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