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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 10, 1862., [Electronic resource].

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Albany (New York, United States) (search for this): article 6
y." In the General's opinion, "a smaller evil (than these intestine wars) would be to allow the fragments of the great Republic to form themselves into new Confederacies, probably four. " He then points out what ought to be the boundaries between the new Unions; and at the end of each, goes so far as even to indicate the cities which ought to be the capitals of the three first on this side of the Rocky Mountains to wit: "Columbia, South Carolina;" "Alton, or Quiney, III," and "Albany, New York," excluding Washington City altogether. This indication of capitals contained in the original, now in my possession, is curiously omitted in the version published in the National Intelligencer. He designates no capital for the fourth Union on the Pacific. The reader will judge what encouragement these views, proceeding from so distinguished a source, must have afforded to the Secessionists of the cotton States. I trust I have said enough, and more than enough, to convince every m
Columbia (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 6
, in comparison with ours, sink into mere child's play." In the General's opinion, "a smaller evil (than these intestine wars) would be to allow the fragments of the great Republic to form themselves into new Confederacies, probably four. " He then points out what ought to be the boundaries between the new Unions; and at the end of each, goes so far as even to indicate the cities which ought to be the capitals of the three first on this side of the Rocky Mountains to wit: "Columbia, South Carolina;" "Alton, or Quiney, III," and "Albany, New York," excluding Washington City altogether. This indication of capitals contained in the original, now in my possession, is curiously omitted in the version published in the National Intelligencer. He designates no capital for the fourth Union on the Pacific. The reader will judge what encouragement these views, proceeding from so distinguished a source, must have afforded to the Secessionists of the cotton States. I trust I have s
Fort Morgan (Alabama, United States) (search for this): article 6
s curiously omitted in the version published in the National Intelligencer. He designates no capital for the fourth Union on the Pacific. The reader will judge what encouragement these views, proceeding from so distinguished a source, must have afforded to the Secessionists of the cotton States. I trust I have said enough, and more than enough, to convince every mind why I did not, with a force of five companies, attempt to reinforce Forts Jackson and St. Philip, on the Mississippi, Fort Morgan, below Mobile; Forts Pickens and McRae, in Pensacola harbor; Fort Pulaski. below Savannah; Forts Moultrie and Sumter, Charleston harbor, and Fort Monroe, in Virginia. These "views," both original and supplementary, were published by Gen. Scott in the National Intelligencer, of January 18th, 1861, at the most important and critical period of the Administration.--Their publication at that time could do no possible good, and might do much harm. To have published them without the Presi
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 6
and McRae, in Pensacola harbor; Fort Pulaski. below Savannah; Forts Moultrie and Sumter, Charleston harbor, and Fort Monroe, in Virginia. These "views," both original and supplementary, were published by Gen. Scott in the National Intelligencerd military stores were dispatched by the Brooklyn to Fort Pickens without a moment's un- necessary delay. She left Fortress Monroe on the 24th of January. Well-founded apprehensions were, however, entertained at the time of her departure thatnication with Washington. The result was highly fortunate. The Brooklyn had a long passage. Although she left Fortress Monroe on the 24th of January, she did not arrive at Pensacola until the 5th of February. In the meantime Fort Pickens, wit they were in his possession. The Brooklyn, with troops, military stores, and provisions was to sail forthwith from Fortress Monroe to Fort Sumter. I am, therefore, utterly at a lose to imagine why the General, in his statement, should have assert
Washington (United States) (search for this): article 6
nion, "a smaller evil (than these intestine wars) would be to allow the fragments of the great Republic to form themselves into new Confederacies, probably four. " He then points out what ought to be the boundaries between the new Unions; and at the end of each, goes so far as even to indicate the cities which ought to be the capitals of the three first on this side of the Rocky Mountains to wit: "Columbia, South Carolina;" "Alton, or Quiney, III," and "Albany, New York," excluding Washington City altogether. This indication of capitals contained in the original, now in my possession, is curiously omitted in the version published in the National Intelligencer. He designates no capital for the fourth Union on the Pacific. The reader will judge what encouragement these views, proceeding from so distinguished a source, must have afforded to the Secessionists of the cotton States. I trust I have said enough, and more than enough, to convince every mind why I did not, with a fo
Alton (Illinois, United States) (search for this): article 6
h ours, sink into mere child's play." In the General's opinion, "a smaller evil (than these intestine wars) would be to allow the fragments of the great Republic to form themselves into new Confederacies, probably four. " He then points out what ought to be the boundaries between the new Unions; and at the end of each, goes so far as even to indicate the cities which ought to be the capitals of the three first on this side of the Rocky Mountains to wit: "Columbia, South Carolina;" "Alton, or Quiney, III," and "Albany, New York," excluding Washington City altogether. This indication of capitals contained in the original, now in my possession, is curiously omitted in the version published in the National Intelligencer. He designates no capital for the fourth Union on the Pacific. The reader will judge what encouragement these views, proceeding from so distinguished a source, must have afforded to the Secessionists of the cotton States. I trust I have said enough, and mo
Buras (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 6
original, now in my possession, is curiously omitted in the version published in the National Intelligencer. He designates no capital for the fourth Union on the Pacific. The reader will judge what encouragement these views, proceeding from so distinguished a source, must have afforded to the Secessionists of the cotton States. I trust I have said enough, and more than enough, to convince every mind why I did not, with a force of five companies, attempt to reinforce Forts Jackson and St. Philip, on the Mississippi, Fort Morgan, below Mobile; Forts Pickens and McRae, in Pensacola harbor; Fort Pulaski. below Savannah; Forts Moultrie and Sumter, Charleston harbor, and Fort Monroe, in Virginia. These "views," both original and supplementary, were published by Gen. Scott in the National Intelligencer, of January 18th, 1861, at the most important and critical period of the Administration.--Their publication at that time could do no possible good, and might do much harm. To have
Fort Pickens (Florida, United States) (search for this): article 6
and St. Philip, on the Mississippi, Fort Morgan, below Mobile; Forts Pickens and McRae, in Pensacola harbor; Fort Pulaski. below Savannah; klyn, with Capt. Vodges's company alone, left the Chesapeake for Fort Pickens about January 22d, and on the 29th President Buchanan, having enwith his brave little command, had been forced to take refuge in Fort Pickens, where he was in imminent danger every moment of being captured ovisions, and military stores were dispatched by the Brooklyn to Fort Pickens without a moment's un- necessary delay. She left Fortress Monreinforcements, with the vessels of war at no great distance from Fort Pickens, could not arrive in time to defend it against the impending attl as the most positive assurance that no attack would be made on Fort Pickens if the present status should be preserved. This proposal wat arrive at Pensacola until the 5th of February. In the meantime Fort Pickens, with Lieutenant Slemmer (whose conduct deserves high commendati
Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 6
d not, with a force of five companies, attempt to reinforce Forts Jackson and St. Philip, on the Mississippi, Fort Morgan, below Mobile; Forts Pickens and McRae, in Pensacola harbor; Fort Pulaski. below Savannah; Forts Moultrie and Sumter, Charleston harbor, and Fort Monroe, in Virginia. These "views," both original and supplementary, were published by Gen. Scott in the National Intelligencer, of January 18th, 1861, at the most important and critical period of the Administration.--Their pect, that he regarded himself secure in his position; and yet more from intelligence which late on Saturday evening, (5th January, 1861,) reached the Department that a heavy battery had been erected among the sand hills, at the entrance to Charleston harbor, which would probably destroy any unarmed vessel (and such was the Star of the West,) which might attempt to make its way to Fort Sumter. This important information satisfied the Government that there was no present necessity for sending r
Fort Jefferson (Florida, United States) (search for this): article 6
telegraph to New York; but the vessel had sailed a short time before it reached the officer (Col. Scott) to whom it was addressed." A statement of these facts, established by dates, proves conclusively that the President was not only willing but anxious in the briefest period to reinforce Fort Sumter. On the 4th of January, the day before the departure of the Star of the West from New York, as Gen. Scott in his statement admits, succor was sent to Fort Taylor, Key West, and to Fort Jefferson, Tortugas Island, which reached these points in time for their security. He nevertheless speculates on the consequences which might have followed had the reinforcements not reached their destination in due time, and even expresses the extraordinary opinion that, with the possession of these forts, "the rebels might have purchased an early recognition." I shall next advert to the statement that the expedition under Captain Ward, "of three or four small steamers belonging to the coas
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